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Re: [WestKingdomEQ] Equestrian vs. virtues

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  • Nancy Reimers
    I only get five? 1. Prowess - If we define prowess as a skill set (not just skill in fighting), I believe this applies to riding under the idea of basic
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 15, 2011
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      I only get five?

      1. Prowess - If we define prowess as a skill set (not just skill in fighting), I believe this applies to riding under the idea of basic equation and horsemanship skills. Good seat, appropriate and knowledgeable application of the aids, having more than one answer to a given challenge.

      2. Franchise - While in an SCA sense many of us think of franchise as Knightly Bearing, I find that for riders there is both a period and a modern application. I can't think of a period horsemanship text that does not address a rider's bearing in terms of equitation and overall appearance.  In a modern sense, it is helpful to project an image as a horseman that is recognizable by other horseman whether you are mounted or not. Finally you need to project the bearing of a horseman to the horse. One of my vet school classmates (who went on to become a dairy vet) once stated: "Cows don't care if you know anything about them. If they want to kick you they do. Horses care whether or not you are a horse person" 

      3. Temperance/Prudence-  you have to pick your battles. You need to not start fights that you can't win.  You need to recognize the risks of both injury and failure and make reasonable preparations to avoid both.

      4. Justice/Mercy - you need to know when it is reasonable to enforce your will (and then do so) .  You need to know when failure is your fault (through lack of preparation or poor communication).  You need to respond appropriately and consistently to each situation.

      5. Faith -  You need to believe in your and your horses ability to accomplish the tasks at hand. You need to not be ruled by unreasonable doubts.  You need to set goals, and then push yourself to accomplish them.

      Else

    • haley boehme
      I like what you have here. I am very interested in what everyone says. Thank you. Haley ________________________________ From: Nancy Reimers
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 15, 2011
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        I like what you have here. I am very interested in what everyone says. Thank you.
        Haley


        From: Nancy Reimers <nancyreimers@...>
        To: scagreenee <scagreenee@...>
        Cc: WestKingdomEQ@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, February 15, 2011 2:20:12 PM
        Subject: Re: [WestKingdomEQ] Equestrian vs. virtues

        I only get five?

        1. Prowess - If we define prowess as a skill set (not just skill in fighting), I believe this applies to riding under the idea of basic equation and horsemanship skills. Good seat, appropriate and knowledgeable application of the aids, having more than one answer to a given challenge.

        2. Franchise - While in an SCA sense many of us think of franchise as Knightly Bearing, I find that for riders there is both a period and a modern application. I can't think of a period horsemanship text that does not address a rider's bearing in terms of equitation and overall appearance.  In a modern sense, it is helpful to project an image as a horseman that is recognizable by other horseman whether you are mounted or not. Finally you need to project the bearing of a horseman to the horse. One of my vet school classmates (who went on to become a dairy vet) once stated: "Cows don't care if you know anything about them. If they want to kick you they do. Horses care whether or not you are a horse person" 

        3. Temperance/Prudence-  you have to pick your battles. You need to not start fights that you can't win.  You need to recognize the risks of both injury and failure and make reasonable preparations to avoid both.

        4. Justice/Mercy - you need to know when it is reasonable to enforce your will (and then do so) .  You need to know when failure is your fault (through lack of preparation or poor communication).  You need to respond appropriately and consistently to each situation.

        5. Faith -  You need to believe in your and your horses ability to accomplish the tasks at hand. You need to not be ruled by unreasonable doubts.  You need to set goals, and then push yourself to accomplish them.

        Else


      • Toni
        ... -How would you relate the knightly virtues to riding? It just so happens that I always wear one of the Acanthus Leaf Designs vitue rings (a token from my
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 16, 2011
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          --- In WestKingdomEQ@yahoogroups.com, "scagreenee" <scagreenee@...> wrote: <snip>
          -How would you relate the knightly virtues to riding?
          It just so happens that I always wear one of the Acanthus Leaf Designs vitue rings (a token from my sweetie :-) ). Using the virtues on the ring as my list, here's how I'd opine they relate to me and my riding (YMMV, obviously ;-) ):

          Courtesy: I do my best to be courteous to Brandee and other riders. Since my riding is predominantly arena riding I follow arena edicate. I ask before lounging in the arena. I pass left shoulder to left shoulder, call my direction is unclear, and basically cooperate with other riders so that the traffic patterns remain clear. I pick up poop in the arena, also.

          For my lessons I -- barring unforseen events -- show up for my lessons early so that I can be all ready to go when my instructor arrives.

          Regarding Brandee, I take her needs into consideration. How is she feeling? How long has it been since she's had a work break? Is she healthy. She's a living being and deserves respect and care (although we do make her work... ;-) ).

          Honor: Hmm, I suppose personal integrity suffuses all we do in life, but I don't think of "honor" right off the bat when I think of riding and Brandee. I suppose it might translate into walking the talk. In making sure Brandee gets what she needs even when it's inconvient or hard (like going out to the barn every day, despite the weather to make sure she gets the exercise she needs.) Doing what I say I'm going to do with regards to riding and horses, I suppose.

          Valor: I'm as risk adverse as anyone you are likily to meet. Getting on and riding, facing my fears and stretching my comfort zone. This has gotten *way* better these last few years. It helps that I have a *very* trustworthy pony and we know each other super well.

          Faith: My number one fav. I have "Faith" turned up on my ring so I can look at it when I need to. Faith that the riding and skill will get better. Riding (especially my dressage skills) takes time to learn, and I have faith that despite some very bad patches I can become the rider I want to be.

          Prowess: The skill of riding. The nuances of "skill" vary, I suppose, on the particular riding discipline one chooses.

          Franchise: A Virtue that is sometimes considered the totallity of Virtues. Here I think I'll focus on the Ease in the saddle that one displays ("spetzzatura" (sp?), for lack of a better term.) I also think it means sharing what you can, be it knowlege or your horse (when appropriate) or whatever. Helping out.

          Humility: There is no One True Way. Knowing that however good you are at riding and horses, there are others who are always going to be better. Not being a braggart, but letting your skill speak for itself.

          > -What would you say are the top 5 virtues in accordance with riding/horse related ideals?

          Again, for me personally, I'd emphasis the following 5:
          - Faith
          - Courtesy
          - Valor
          - Humility
          - Franchise (which is cheating, really, because to be at ease in the saddle you have to have prowess in riding. ;-) .

          Genevieve
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