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Fwd: Western Equine Encephalitis Found in Washoe County - Press Release

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  • DIANNE KARP
    Reno not being that far from the rest of you........... Siobhan FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Tracie Douglas, PIO August 13, 2010 328-6140
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 17 10:23 PM
    Reno not being that far from the rest of you...........

    Siobhan


    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Tracie Douglas, PIO
    August 13, 2010
    328-6140
    846-0066 Cell

    FIRST WESTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS POSITIVES FOUND IN WASHOE COUNTY
    SENTENAL CHICKEN FLOCK

    Western Equine Encephalitis (WEE) has been detected in the
    Lemmon Valley sentinel chicken flocks kept by the Washoe
    County Health District. It is one of several mosquito-borne
    virus diseases that can affect the central nervous system,
    causing severe complications, including death. Just as with
    West Nile activity, the Health District will continue to trap
    and test mosquitoes and apply control measures for human
    disease intervention. Western Equine Encephalitis is found
    mainly in the plains regions of the western and central
    United States. While there is no specific treatment for
    western equine encephalitis, prevention centers on
    controlling mosquitoes and avoiding mosquito bites.
    “We’ve kept flocks of chickens throughout Washoe County
    as a means to warn us of any arbo-virus activity, such as
    WEE, because the chickens are a good early warning
    sentinel,” explained Scott Monsen, program manager for the
    Vector Borne Disease and Prevention Program.
    “Practicing preventive measures to reduce the chance of being bitten by
    mosquitoes is the best way to prevent humans from contracting the virus,
    stated Mary Anderson, MD, MPH, District Health Officer. “Remember to
    use mosquito repellent containing DEET, Picaridin or Oil of Lemon
    Eucalyptus. Be aware that mosquitoes are most active during dusk and
    dawn. When sending children out to play during early morning or evening
    hours, parents should have them wear long sleeves and long pants, as well
    as repellent. Also check to make sure the screens on your windows and
    doors fit properly.”
    Western equine encephalitis is a disease that is spread to horses and
    humans by infected mosquitoes. It is one of a group of mosquito-borne
    virus diseases that can –more-

    WEE IN WASHOE COUNTY
    2-2-2-2
    affect the central nervous system and cause severe complications and even
    death. People with mild illness often have only a headache and sometimes
    fever. Other similar diseases are Eastern Equine Encephalitis and St.
    Louis Encephalitis. After infection, the virus invades the central
    nervous system, including the spinal cord and brain. People with more
    severe disease can have sudden high fever, headache, drowsiness,
    irritability, nausea, and vomiting, followed by confusion, weakness, and
    coma. Young infants often suffer seizures. Symptoms usually appear in
    five to ten days after the bite of an infected mosquito and diagnosis is
    based on tests of blood or spinal fluid.
    Anyone can get western equine encephalitis, but some people are at
    increased risk:

    People living in or visiting areas where the disease is common
    People who work outside or participate in outdoor recreational activities
    in areas where the disease is common

    Western equine encephalitis occurs in all age groups. Major
    complications, including brain damage, are reported in about 13 percent
    of infected persons overall and in about a third of infants. The disease
    is fatal to about 3 percent of persons who develop severe symptoms.
    There is no specific treatment for WEE. Antibiotics are not effective
    against viruses, and no effective anti-viral drugs have been discovered.
    Care of patients centers on treatment of symptoms and complications.
    Western Equine Encephalitis is a relatively rare disease in humans. Since
    1964, 639 human cases have been confirmed in the United States. Fewer
    than five cases
    -more-

    WEE in Washoe County
    3-3-3-3-3
    are reported each year. In the United States, cases in humans are usually
    first seen in June or July. A vaccine is available for horses but not
    for humans. Prevention truly centers on public health action to control
    mosquitoes and on individual action to avoid mosquito bites. WEE is NOT
    spread through casual contact such as touching or kissing a person with
    the virus.
    Anderson also reminds local horse owners to get their animals vaccinated
    against West Nile Virus, Saint Louis Encephalitis and WEE if they
    haven’t done so as of yet. Do not use repellents meant for humans on
    pets. Check with your veterinarian for products that are pet specific.
    For more information, please call 328-2434 or go to our web site at
    www.washoecounty.us/health or to the Centers for Disease Control and
    Prevention at CDC.gov.

    -30-


    SPECIAL NOTE TO THE MEDIA:
    Telephone numbers:
    Washoe County: 775-328-2434
    Department of Agriculture: 775-353-3600
    Clark County – West Nile Hotline: 702-759-1220
    Carson City: 775-887-2190








    -----Original Message-----
    From: Deborah Casaubon (dcasaubo) <dcasaubo@...>
    To: Nancy Karns-Johnson <nkarnsjohnson@...>
    Sent: Tue, Aug 17, 2010 9:12 am
    Subject: Western Equine Encephalitis Found in Washoe County - Press Release






    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Tracie Douglas, PIO
    August 13, 2010
    328-6140
    846-0066 Cell

    FIRST WESTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS POSITIVES FOUND IN WASHOE COUNTY
    SENTENAL CHICKEN FLOCK

    Western Equine Encephalitis (WEE) has been detected in the
    Lemmon Valley sentinel chicken flocks kept by the Washoe
    County Health District. It is one of several mosquito-borne
    virus diseases that can affect the central nervous system,
    causing severe complications, including death. Just as with
    West Nile activity, the Health District will continue to trap
    and test mosquitoes and apply control measures for human
    disease intervention. Western Equine Encephalitis is found
    mainly in the plains regions of the western and central
    United States. While there is no specific treatment for
    western equine encephalitis, prevention centers on
    controlling mosquitoes and avoiding mosquito bites.
    “We’ve kept flocks of chickens throughout Washoe County
    as a means to warn us of any arbo-virus activity, such as
    WEE, because the chickens are a good early warning
    sentinel,” explained Scott Monsen, program manager for the
    Vector Borne Disease and Prevention Program.
    “Practicing preventive measures to reduce the chance of being bitten by
    mosquitoes is the best way to prevent humans from contracting the virus,
    stated Mary Anderson, MD, MPH, District Health Officer. “Remember to
    use mosquito repellent containing DEET, Picaridin or Oil of Lemon
    Eucalyptus. Be aware that mosquitoes are most active during dusk and
    dawn. When sending children out to play during early morning or evening
    hours, parents should have them wear long sleeves and long pants, as well
    as repellent. Also check to make sure the screens on your windows and
    doors fit properly.”
    Western equine encephalitis is a disease that is spread to horses and
    humans by infected mosquitoes. It is one of a group of mosquito-borne
    virus diseases that can –more-

    WEE IN WASHOE COUNTY
    2-2-2-2
    affect the central nervous system and cause severe complications and even
    death. People with mild illness often have only a headache and sometimes
    fever. Other similar diseases are Eastern Equine Encephalitis and St.
    Louis Encephalitis. After infection, the virus invades the central
    nervous system, including the spinal cord and brain. People with more
    severe disease can have sudden high fever, headache, drowsiness,
    irritability, nausea, and vomiting, followed by confusion, weakness, and
    coma. Young infants often suffer seizures. Symptoms usually appear in
    five to ten days after the bite of an infected mosquito and diagnosis is
    based on tests of blood or spinal fluid.
    Anyone can get western equine encephalitis, but some people are at
    increased risk:

    People living in or visiting areas where the disease is common
    People who work outside or participate in outdoor recreational activities
    in areas where the disease is common

    Western equine encephalitis occurs in all age groups. Major
    complications, including brain damage, are reported in about 13 percent
    of infected persons overall and in about a third of infants. The disease
    is fatal to about 3 percent of persons who develop severe symptoms.
    There is no specific treatment for WEE. Antibiotics are not effective
    against viruses, and no effective anti-viral drugs have been discovered.
    Care of patients centers on treatment of symptoms and complications.
    Western Equine Encephalitis is a relatively rare disease in humans. Since
    1964, 639 human cases have been confirmed in the United States. Fewer
    than five cases
    -more-

    WEE in Washoe County
    3-3-3-3-3
    are reported each year. In the United States, cases in humans are usually
    first seen in June or July. A vaccine is available for horses but not
    for humans. Prevention truly centers on public health action to control
    mosquitoes and on individual action to avoid mosquito bites. WEE is NOT
    spread through casual contact such as touching or kissing a person with
    the virus.
    Anderson also reminds local horse owners to get their animals vaccinated
    against West Nile Virus, Saint Louis Encephalitis and WEE if they
    haven’t done so as of yet. Do not use repellents meant for humans on
    pets. Check with your veterinarian for products that are pet specific.
    For more information, please call 328-2434 or go to our web site at
    www.washoecounty.us/health or to the Centers for Disease Control and
    Prevention at CDC.gov.

    -30-


    SPECIAL NOTE TO THE MEDIA:
    Telephone numbers:
    Washoe County: 775-328-2434
    Department of Agriculture: 775-353-3600
    Clark County – West Nile Hotline: 702-759-1220
    Carson City: 775-887-2190
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