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9079Re: talk about bad articles!!!!!!

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  • Ellen Johnson
    Jul 2, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Gee, does that mean the Fjords just don't realize they can stand up now???

      Ellen
      --- In WestKingdomEQ@yahoogroups.com, Rachael Keish <rachaelo@...> wrote:
      >
      > Heheh, thanks, I needed a good laugh today Your Grace!
      > :-), Marguerite
      > (home sick...gotta love preschoolers sharing their germs)
      >
      > On Wed, Jul 1, 2009 at 11:48 AM, Henrik Olsgaard <henriksd5@...>wrote:
      >
      > > Now see, this is really confusing. I thought draft horses were bred by the
      > > ansestors of the Incas in the high Andes mountains, because they didn't have
      > > wheels, to carry heavy loads. Then the ice age set in - starting at the tops
      > > of the highest mountains and working down to the lowlands. The ice age then
      > > drove the drafts up into Montana where the Tyranosaurs ate most of them.
      > > Recent discovery of a fosilised tyranosaur mummy has allowed scientists to
      > > do radiographic studies of this tyranosaur, including it's internal organs
      > > and they've found it's stomach and the food it ate. There seem to be
      > > distinct evidence it included a draft horse, according to the national
      > > inquirer magazine! And bat boy was riding it!
      > >
      > > From there the remaining few draft horses were driven by the advancing ice,
      > > north westerly to the Bearing Strait where they encountered the first wave
      > > of the most recent humans migrating from Asia, who were hungry and ate them.
      > > A very few of the draft horses managed to hide in the snow there by
      > > pretending to be "drifts" ( clearly a corruption of the word "draft") and
      > > were passed by. They then, continued into Siberia where they were able to
      > > find a place to live on the steppes. Over time the remaining draft horses
      > > got used to the windy drafts ( again a clear connection with that breed) on
      > > the steppes by hunching down when the wind blew, and became shorter. Then
      > > the local humans caught them and domesticated them . Some of those horses
      > > were then taken to warmer climates where the wind didn't blow and they
      > > stopped hunching down and so stood taller and became the big draft horses we
      > > know today.
      > >
      > > That's how I understood the origins of draft horses. Is that really wrong?
      > >
      > > Henrik
      > >
      > >
      > > ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In WestKingdomEQ@yahoogroups.com, "DIANNE KARP" <diannekarp@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Did you know that the draft horse began during the ice age!!!!! oh my oh
      > > > my read on.........
      > > >
      > > > Siobhan
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > http://www.equestrianmag.com/article.php?story=power_behind_the_draft
      > > >
      > > > Power Behind the Draft
      > > > An EquestrianMag Exclusive Article
      > > >
      > > > It is quite possible that the United States of America would not have
      > > > been able to build the strong industry is has today without the help of
      > > > the draft horse. These horses have aided this country through the
      > > > Industrial Revolution, World War I, and even play a vital role today.
      > > > Known as an icon of strength and power, draft horses are the "gentle
      > > > giants" of the equine species.
      > > >
      > > > A "draft" horse is any horse capable of pulling heavy loads, and that is
      > > > exactly what these horses do best. The draft horse can vary in size and
      > > > weight. The height of a draft horse ranges from sixteen to eighteen hands
      > > > high, and weighs between sixteen hundred and two thousand pounds.
      > > > Considering other horses typically do not stand higher than fifteen or
      > > > sixteen hands high, the draft horse seems to tower over other horses when
      > > > standing side by side.
      > > >
      > > > The massive size of a draft horse may be considered intimidating to those
      > > > unfamiliar with this type of horse, or to those who are accustomed to
      > > > smaller horses, but the draft horse has a calm, friendly and willing
      > > > temperament. Once the initial shock of the draft horse's size wears off,
      > > > however, most horse lovers find this animal to be a very gentle family
      > > > horse. These excellent qualities coupled with a strong muscular build
      > > > make the draft a welcomed companion in the field.
      > > >
      > > > The draft horse has a history heavy in war, agriculture and
      > > > industrialism. It is believed that the Ice Age forced groups of horses
      > > > into sections that were divided by glaciers. Each section developed
      > > > traits necessary for their survival. It was at this time that the draft
      > > > horse began to develop.
      > > >
      > > > Hundreds of years later the draft horse was domesticated by man. These
      > > > horses were heavily relied up on during the Medieval period (500-1000
      > > > A.D.) for their strength and endurance. Medieval knights rode these
      > > > horses though tough terrain during times of war. Their size, speed and
      > > > good temperament made then faithful companions on the battlefield. It was
      > > > also during the Medieval period that the infamous "Black Horse of
      > > > Flanders" appeared in Europe . This horse is believed to be the "father"
      > > > of all modern draft horses.
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
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