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Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC

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  • Lou Muscarella
    Do you mean project as a plan for an entity or program to manage until it is complete? Or do you mean project as in a housing projects, where it gets
    Message 1 of 12 , May 9 8:41 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Do you mean "project" as a plan for an entity or program to manage until it is complete?

      Or do you mean "project" as in a housing projects, where it gets turned into a continuous crime scene?

       Lou


      -----Original Message-----
      From: William Jordan <whj@...>
      To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Fri, 9 May 2008 7:38 am
      Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC


      I will not argue against that point, but I meant treat it something like a nuisance property and have another team restructure and develop it as a workforce/market  housing project.   I would have no interest in seeing it fail, if there was in opportunity to make it a better quality product for tenants and the community.

      Williaam

      nathan boggs wrote:
      Are you serious?  What makes you think that DC gov't with all its incompetence could manage a project as well as a developer?  There is not one DC agency that is well run, except parking.  Hre is one thing that rangs true.  If Allegro is such a badly run project, it will fail.  The market will make sure of that.  The government should focus on getting its house in order. 

      --- On Thu, 5/8/08, William Jordan <whj@...> wrote:
      From: William Jordan <whj@...>
      Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
      To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, May 8, 2008, 10:29 AM


      If you notice things are moving on projects that approach Transit
      Oriented Development and projects that have been in the works for the
      last 10 years or so finally coming out of the ground. Most the the
      projects were not based in the go-go subprime condo boom, but from hard
      community work. The Allegro project is really to only go-go project and
      it pushed out what was supposed to be a more community oriented mix use
      project (And has not made good on its community benefits packaage). In
      fact Canyon-Johnson in another forum was supposed to be a partner in the
      DC USA project, but backed out.

      My point is that projects that had high levels of community involvement
      continue to march on. The go-go greed project designed to exploit these
      community for quick flip bucks are the ones that are drying up, that's a
      good thing. I only wish there was a way for the city to buy out Allegro
      and turn it into a qualiy project.

      William

      dominicsale@ yahoo.com wrote:

      >
      >----- Original Message -----
      >Subject:Developmen t booming in NW DC
      >Date:Thu, 8 May 2008 13:45:09
      >From:Sale, Dominic K. <Dominic_K._Sale@ omb.eop.gov>
      >To: <dominicsale@ yahoo.com>
      >
      > Interest shines on NW area of city
      >
      >May 8, 2008
      >
      >By Tom Ramstack - Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development announced
      >plans last week for a new residential development in the Columbia
      >Heights/Petworth neighborhood.
      >
      >The team is one of several developers trying to grab some of the last sites
      >available in the neighborhood at a reasonable cost.
      >
      >Many sites in the downtown area have been lost to redevelopment in recent
      >years, until the housing market collapse dried up developers' interest in
      >building neighborhood projects.
      >
      >Columbia Heights/Petworth is one of the exceptions.
      >
      >While developers refuse to even consider new residential projects in most of
      >the region, Columbia Heights/Petworth is home to the Privado condominiums, the
      >Allegro apartments, Kenyon Square
      >condominiums and now the future Park
      > Place mixed-use project. All of them are either
      >recently completed, being built or just announced.
      >
      >"It's a fast moving neighborhood, " said Bob Moore, president of the
      >Development Corporation of Columbia
      > Heights , a nonprofit business development
      >organization. "It's one of the few neighborhoods where there's still a lot
      >of housing investment going on."
      >
      >Among its attractions for developers are two Metro stops, the
      >546,000-square- foot DC USA shopping and entertainment complex at
      > 14th Street and
      > Park Road Northwest
      >that opened in March, a downtown location and a sprinkling of vacant lots or
      >parking lots that are ripe for new buildings.
      >
      >"They haven't had to tear down much of anything to build on it," Mr.
      >Moore said.
      >
      >For the Park Place ,
      >Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development obtained a $53 million
      >construction loan. The complex would include 161 condominiums and apartments
      >and 16,000 square feet of retail.
      >
      >The seven-story building is expected to be finished by July 2009 over the
      >Georgia Avenue/Petworth Metro station, only one block from DC USA.
      >
      >"We are true believers in Washington ,
      > D.C. , and this vibrant Columbia
      >Heights/Petworth neighborhood, " basketball player turned business magnate
      >Magic Johnson said in a statement.
      >
      >The Privado, a separate project due for completion at the end of this year at
      > 1443 Chapin St. NW ,
      >consists of 16 condominiums a half-block from
      > Meridian Hill
      > Park . It is being built
      >by Drummond Development, which has specialized in revitalizing
      > Washington
      >neighborhoods.
      >
      >The Allegro apartments and retail space are going up at
      > 3460 14th St. NW with a completion date
      >scheduled for 2009.
      >
      > Kenyon Square
      >condominiums at 14th and Kenyon streets Northwest opened in 2007.
      >
      >In other news ...
      >
      >c Federal Realty Investment Trust yesterday said it is opening the ninth phase
      >of Bethesda Row, a seven-block redevelopment of downtown
      > Bethesda with retail, residences and office
      >space.
      >
      >The most recent segment includes 43,000 square feet of boutique stores and
      >restaurants, 180 apartments and 244 parking spaces. They were built on the
      >1.7-acre site of a former Giant Food store.
      >
      >The latest development adds to the existing 477,000 square feet of redeveloped
      >space in Bethesda Row that includes retailers such as a Barnes & Noble
      >outlet, an Apple Store and Discovery Galleries.
      >
      >• Property Lines runs on Thursdays.
      >Call Tom Ramstack at 202/636-3180 or e-mail tramstack @ washington times.com.
      >
      >
      >
      >----------- --------- --------- -------
      >
      >To unsubscribe, email WardOneDC-unsubscri be@yahoogroups. com
      >
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >



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    • nathan boggs
      I may be missing something. What is so wrong with the Allegro project? --- On Fri, 5/9/08, Lou Muscarella wrote: From: Lou Muscarella
      Message 2 of 12 , May 9 8:44 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        I may be missing something.  What is so wrong with the Allegro project?

        --- On Fri, 5/9/08, Lou Muscarella <looie2@...> wrote:
        From: Lou Muscarella <looie2@...>
        Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
        To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, May 9, 2008, 11:41 AM

        Do you mean "project" as a plan for an entity or program to manage until it is complete?

        Or do you mean "project" as in a housing projects, where it gets turned into a continuous crime scene?

         Lou


        -----Original Message-----
        From: William Jordan <whj@melanet. com>
        To: WardOneDC@yahoogrou ps.com
        Sent: Fri, 9 May 2008 7:38 am
        Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC


        I will not argue against that point, but I meant treat it something like a nuisance property and have another team restructure and develop it as a workforce/market  housing project.   I would have no interest in seeing it fail, if there was in opportunity to make it a better quality product for tenants and the community.

        Williaam

        nathan boggs wrote:
        Are you serious?  What makes you think that DC gov't with all its incompetence could manage a project as well as a developer?  There is not one DC agency that is well run, except parking.  Hre is one thing that rangs true.  If Allegro is such a badly run project, it will fail.  The market will make sure of that.  The government should focus on getting its house in order. 

        --- On Thu, 5/8/08, William Jordan <whj@melanet. com> wrote:
        From: William Jordan <whj@melanet. com>
        Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
        To: WardOneDC@yahoogrou ps.com
        Date: Thursday, May 8, 2008, 10:29 AM


        If you notice things are moving on projects that approach Transit
        Oriented Development and projects that have been in the works for the
        last 10 years or so finally coming out of the ground. Most the the
        projects were not based in the go-go subprime condo boom, but from hard
        community work. The Allegro project is really to only go-go project and
        it pushed out what was supposed to be a more community oriented mix use
        project (And has not made good on its community benefits packaage). In
        fact Canyon-Johnson in another forum was supposed to be a partner in the
        DC USA project, but backed out.

        My point is that projects that had high levels of community involvement
        continue to march on. The go-go greed project designed to exploit these
        community for quick flip bucks are the ones that are drying up, that's a
        good thing. I only wish there was a way for the city to buy out Allegro
        and turn it into a qualiy project.

        William

        dominicsale@ yahoo.com wrote:

        >
        >----- Original Message -----
        >Subject:Developmen t booming in NW DC
        >Date:Thu, 8 May 2008 13:45:09
        >From:Sale, Dominic K. <Dominic_K._Sale@ omb.eop.gov>
        >To: <dominicsale@ yahoo.com>
        >
        > Interest shines on NW area of city
        >
        >May 8, 2008
        >
        >By Tom Ramstack - Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development announced
        >plans last week for a new residential development in the Columbia
        >Heights/Petworth neighborhood.
        >
        >The team is one of several developers trying to grab some of the last sites
        >available in the neighborhood at a reasonable cost.
        >
        >Many sites in the downtown area have been lost to redevelopment in recent
        >years, until the housing market collapse dried up developers' interest in
        >building neighborhood projects.
        >
        >Columbia Heights/Petworth is one of the exceptions.
        >
        >While developers refuse to even consider new residential projects in most of
        >the region, Columbia Heights/Petworth is home to the Privado condominiums, the
        >Allegro apartments, Kenyon Square
        >condominiums and now the future Park
        > Place mixed-use project. All of them are either
        >recently completed, being built or just announced.
        >
        >"It's a fast moving neighborhood, " said Bob Moore, president of the
        >Development Corporation of Columbia
        > Heights , a nonprofit business development
        >organization. "It's one of the few neighborhoods where there's still a lot
        >of housing investment going on."
        >
        >Among its attractions for developers are two Metro stops, the
        >546,000-square- foot DC USA shopping and entertainment complex at
        > 14th Street and
        > Park Road Northwest
        >that opened in March, a downtown location and a sprinkling of vacant lots or
        >parking lots that are ripe for new buildings.
        >
        >"They haven't had to tear down much of anything to build on it," Mr.
        >Moore said.
        >
        >For the Park Place ,
        >Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development obtained a $53 million
        >construction loan. The complex would include 161 condominiums and apartments
        >and 16,000 square feet of retail.
        >
        >The seven-story building is expected to be finished by July 2009 over the
        >Georgia Avenue/Petworth Metro station, only one block from DC USA.
        >
        >"We are true believers in Washington ,
        > D.C. , and this vibrant Columbia
        >Heights/Petworth neighborhood, " basketball player turned business magnate
        >Magic Johnson said in a statement.
        >
        >The Privado, a separate project due for completion at the end of this year at
        > 1443 Chapin St. NW ,
        >consists of 16 condominiums a half-block from
        > Meridian Hill
        > Park . It is being built
        >by Drummond Development, which has specialized in revitalizing
        > Washington
        >neighborhoods.
        >
        >The Allegro apartments and retail space are going up at
        > 3460 14th St. NW with a completion date
        >scheduled for 2009.
        >
        > Kenyon Square
        >condominiums at 14th and Kenyon streets Northwest opened in 2007.
        >
        >In other news ...
        >
        >c Federal Realty Investment Trust yesterday said it is opening the ninth phase
        >of Bethesda Row, a seven-block redevelopment of downtown
        > Bethesda with retail, residences and office
        >space.
        >
        >The most recent segment includes 43,000 square feet of boutique stores and
        >restaurants, 180 apartments and 244 parking spaces. They were built on the
        >1.7-acre site of a former Giant Food store.
        >
        >The latest development adds to the existing 477,000 square feet of redeveloped
        >space in Bethesda Row that includes retailers such as a Barnes & Noble
        >outlet, an Apple Store and Discovery Galleries.
        >
        >• Property Lines runs on Thursdays.
        >Call Tom Ramstack at 202/636-3180 or e-mail tramstack @ washington times.com.
        >
        >
        >
        >----------- --------- --------- -------
        >
        >To unsubscribe, email WardOneDC-unsubscri be@yahoogroups. com
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >



        Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.



        Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
      • William Jordan
        The Allegro project was designed as a quick flip financial transaction in a hot housing market feuled by cheap money. It was never designed primarily as a
        Message 3 of 12 , May 9 9:42 AM
        • 0 Attachment

          The Allegro project was designed as a quick flip financial transaction in a hot housing market feuled by cheap money.  It was never designed primarily as a quality  sustainable residential development  as a project nor for the neighborhood it is being integrated into.  The project was designed to squeeze  as many units into the space using the cheapest construction techniques possible.  Padding profits by selling over prices parking spaces.  I don't blame the developer, its his job to make money. The project as all the hall marks of a 60s/70s low income housing project with folk pay luxury prices.  The untils are small and the common spaces poorly designed and the overall architecture crap.  With the change in the market and it becoming rental it will become like a college dorm project. Some units are no more than 15ft or so from the fire station with no buffer.

          The CM, DDOT, DCRA, Zoning and etc. turned there backs on helping the developer and community to integrate this a quality project.  Typical any development is good development.  The government should invest in aquiring the project with a private developer so that it can be retro-fitted as a workforce/market rate housing mixed income project.  Which would mean increasing the size of units and reducing the  overall number of units as well revisting the common spaces.  

          Just my view.  

          William

          Lou Muscarella wrote:
          Do you mean "project" as a plan for an entity or program to manage until it is complete?

          Or do you mean "project" as in a housing projects, where it gets turned into a continuous crime scene?

           Lou


          -----Original Message-----
          From: William Jordan <whj@...>
          To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Fri, 9 May 2008 7:38 am
          Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC


          I will not argue against that point, but I meant treat it something like a nuisance property and have another team restructure and develop it as a workforce/market  housing project.   I would have no interest in seeing it fail, if there was in opportunity to make it a better quality product for tenants and the community.

          Williaam

          nathan boggs wrote:
          Are you serious?  What makes you think that DC gov't with all its incompetence could manage a project as well as a developer?  There is not one DC agency that is well run, except parking.  Hre is one thing that rangs true.  If Allegro is such a badly run project, it will fail.  The market will make sure of that.  The government should focus on getting its house in order. 

          --- On Thu, 5/8/08, William Jordan <whj@...> wrote:
          From: William Jordan <whj@...>
          Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
          To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, May 8, 2008, 10:29 AM


          If you notice things are moving on projects that approach Transit
          Oriented Development and projects that have been in the works for the
          last 10 years or so finally coming out of the ground. Most the the
          projects were not based in the go-go subprime condo boom, but from hard
          community work. The Allegro project is really to only go-go project and
          it pushed out what was supposed to be a more community oriented mix use
          project (And has not made good on its community benefits packaage). In
          fact Canyon-Johnson in another forum was supposed to be a partner in the
          DC USA project, but backed out.

          My point is that projects that had high levels of community involvement
          continue to march on. The go-go greed project designed to exploit these
          community for quick flip bucks are the ones that are drying up, that's a
          good thing. I only wish there was a way for the city to buy out Allegro
          and turn it into a qualiy project.

          William

          dominicsale@ yahoo.com wrote:

          >
          >----- Original Message -----
          >Subject:Developmen t booming in NW DC
          >Date:Thu, 8 May 2008 13:45:09
          >From:Sale, Dominic K. <Dominic_K._Sale@ omb.eop.gov>
          >To: <dominicsale@ yahoo.com>
          >
          > Interest shines on NW area of city
          >
          >May 8, 2008
          >
          >By Tom Ramstack - Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development announced
          >plans last week for a new residential development in the Columbia
          >Heights/Petworth neighborhood.
          >
          >The team is one of several developers trying to grab some of the last sites
          >available in the neighborhood at a reasonable cost.
          >
          >Many sites in the downtown area have been lost to redevelopment in recent
          >years, until the housing market collapse dried up developers' interest in
          >building neighborhood projects.
          >
          >Columbia Heights/Petworth is one of the exceptions.
          >
          >While developers refuse to even consider new residential projects in most of
          >the region, Columbia Heights/Petworth is home to the Privado condominiums, the
          >Allegro apartments, Kenyon Square
          >condominiums and now the future Park
          > Place mixed-use project. All of them are either
          >recently completed, being built or just announced.
          >
          >"It's a fast moving neighborhood, " said Bob Moore, president of the
          >Development Corporation of Columbia
          > Heights , a nonprofit business development
          >organization. "It's one of the few neighborhoods where there's still a lot
          >of housing investment going on."
          >
          >Among its attractions for developers are two Metro stops, the
          >546,000-square- foot DC USA shopping and entertainment complex at
          > 14th Street and
          > Park Road Northwest
          >that opened in March, a downtown location and a sprinkling of vacant lots or
          >parking lots that are ripe for new buildings.
          >
          >"They haven't had to tear down much of anything to build on it," Mr.
          >Moore said.
          >
          >For the Park Place ,
          >Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development obtained a $53 million
          >construction loan. The complex would include 161 condominiums and apartments
          >and 16,000 square feet of retail.
          >
          >The seven-story building is expected to be finished by July 2009 over the
          >Georgia Avenue/Petworth Metro station, only one block from DC USA.
          >
          >"We are true believers in Washington ,
          > D.C. , and this vibrant Columbia
          >Heights/Petworth neighborhood, " basketball player turned business magnate
          >Magic Johnson said in a statement.
          >
          >The Privado, a separate project due for completion at the end of this year at
          > 1443 Chapin St. NW ,
          >consists of 16 condominiums a half-block from
          > Meridian Hill
          > Park . It is being built
          >by Drummond Development, which has specialized in revitalizing
          > Washington
          >neighborhoods.
          >
          >The Allegro apartments and retail space are going up at
          > 3460 14th St. NW with a completion date
          >scheduled for 2009.
          >
          > Kenyon Square
          >condominiums at 14th and Kenyon streets Northwest opened in 2007.
          >
          >In other news ...
          >
          >c Federal Realty Investment Trust yesterday said it is opening the ninth phase
          >of Bethesda Row, a seven-block redevelopment of downtown
          > Bethesda with retail, residences and office
          >space.
          >
          >The most recent segment includes 43,000 square feet of boutique stores and
          >restaurants, 180 apartments and 244 parking spaces. They were built on the
          >1.7-acre site of a former Giant Food store.
          >
          >The latest development adds to the existing 477,000 square feet of redeveloped
          >space in Bethesda Row that includes retailers such as a Barnes & Noble
          >outlet, an Apple Store and Discovery Galleries.
          >
          >• Property Lines runs on Thursdays.
          >Call Tom Ramstack at 202/636-3180 or e-mail tramstack @ washington times.com.
          >
          >
          >
          >----------- --------- --------- -------
          >
          >To unsubscribe, email WardOneDC-unsubscri be@yahoogroups. com
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >



          Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.


        • nathan boggs
          But if the Allegro project is as bad as you say, won t it ultimately end up being affordable for the working class? With all the condos coming online, a poorly
          Message 4 of 12 , May 9 9:53 AM
          • 0 Attachment

            But if the Allegro project is as bad as you say, won't it ultimately end up being affordable for the working class?  With all the condos coming online, a poorly designed project will likely have a hard time selling.  Or at the least it will have a difficult time selling for top dollar.  In my opinion, the city doesn't need more affordable housing.  I see houses on the market everyday in SE for under 250K.  Why do people feel entitled to affordable housing in expensive neighborhoods? 

            Nathan

            --- On Fri, 5/9/08, William Jordan <whj@...> wrote:

            From: William Jordan <whj@...>
            Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
            To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Friday, May 9, 2008, 12:42 PM


            The Allegro project was designed as a quick flip financial transaction in a hot housing market feuled by cheap money.  It was never designed primarily as a quality  sustainable residential development  as a project nor for the neighborhood it is being integrated into.  The project was designed to squeeze  as many units into the space using the cheapest construction techniques possible.  Padding profits by selling over prices parking spaces.  I don't blame the developer, its his job to make money. The project as all the hall marks of a 60s/70s low income housing project with folk pay luxury prices.  The untils are small and the common spaces poorly designed and the overall architecture crap.  With the change in the market and it becoming rental it will become like a college dorm project. Some units are no more than 15ft or so from the fire station with no buffer.

            The CM, DDOT, DCRA, Zoning and etc. turned there backs on helping the developer and community to integrate this a quality project.  Typical any development is good development.  The government should invest in aquiring the project with a private developer so that it can be retro-fitted as a workforce/market rate housing mixed income project.  Which would mean increasing the size of units and reducing the  overall number of units as well revisting the common spaces.  

            Just my view.  

            William

            Lou Muscarella wrote:
            Do you mean "project" as a plan for an entity or program to manage until it is complete?

            Or do you mean "project" as in a housing projects, where it gets turned into a continuous crime scene?

             Lou


            -----Original Message-----
            From: William Jordan <whj@...>
            To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Fri, 9 May 2008 7:38 am
            Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC


            I will not argue against that point, but I meant treat it something like a nuisance property and have another team restructure and develop it as a workforce/market  housing project.   I would have no interest in seeing it fail, if there was in opportunity to make it a better quality product for tenants and the community.

            Williaam

            nathan boggs wrote:
            Are you serious?  What makes you think that DC gov't with all its incompetence could manage a project as well as a developer?  There is not one DC agency that is well run, except parking.  Hre is one thing that rangs true.  If Allegro is such a badly run project, it will fail.  The market will make sure of that.  The government should focus on getting its house in order. 

            --- On Thu, 5/8/08, William Jordan <whj@...> wrote:
            From: William Jordan <whj@...>
            Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
            To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, May 8, 2008, 10:29 AM


            If you notice things are moving on projects that approach Transit
            Oriented Development and projects that have been in the works for the
            last 10 years or so finally coming out of the ground. Most the the
            projects were not based in the go-go subprime condo boom, but from hard
            community work. The Allegro project is really to only go-go project and
            it pushed out what was supposed to be a more community oriented mix use
            project (And has not made good on its community benefits packaage). In
            fact Canyon-Johnson in another forum was supposed to be a partner in the
            DC USA project, but backed out.

            My point is that projects that had high levels of community involvement
            continue to march on. The go-go greed project designed to exploit these
            community for quick flip bucks are the ones that are drying up, that's a
            good thing. I only wish there was a way for the city to buy out Allegro
            and turn it into a qualiy project.

            William

            dominicsale@ yahoo.com wrote:

            >
            >----- Original Message -----
            >Subject:Developmen t booming in NW DC
            >Date:Thu, 8 May 2008 13:45:09
            >From:Sale, Dominic K. <Dominic_K._Sale@ omb.eop.gov>
            >To: <dominicsale@ yahoo.com>
            >
            > Interest shines on NW area of city
            >
            >May 8, 2008
            >
            >By Tom Ramstack - Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development announced
            >plans last week for a new residential development in the Columbia
            >Heights/Petworth neighborhood.
            >
            >The team is one of several developers trying to grab some of the last sites
            >available in the neighborhood at a reasonable cost.
            >
            >Many sites in the downtown area have been lost to redevelopment in recent
            >years, until the housing market collapse dried up developers' interest in
            >building neighborhood projects.
            >
            >Columbia Heights/Petworth is one of the exceptions.
            >
            >While developers refuse to even consider new residential projects in most of
            >the region, Columbia Heights/Petworth is home to the Privado condominiums, the
            >Allegro apartments, Kenyon Square
            >condominiums and now the future Park
            > Place mixed-use project. All of them are either
            >recently completed, being built or just announced.
            >
            >"It's a fast moving neighborhood, " said Bob Moore, president of the
            >Development Corporation of Columbia
            > Heights , a nonprofit business development
            >organization. "It's one of the few neighborhoods where there's still a lot
            >of housing investment going on."
            >
            >Among its attractions for developers are two Metro stops, the
            >546,000-square- foot DC USA shopping and entertainment complex at
            > 14th Street and
            > Park Road Northwest
            >that opened in March, a downtown location and a sprinkling of vacant lots or
            >parking lots that are ripe for new buildings.
            >
            >"They haven't had to tear down much of anything to build on it," Mr.
            >Moore said.
            >
            >For the Park Place ,
            >Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development obtained a $53 million
            >construction loan. The complex would include 161 condominiums and apartments
            >and 16,000 square feet of retail.
            >
            >The seven-story building is expected to be finished by July 2009 over the
            >Georgia Avenue/Petworth Metro station, only one block from DC USA.
            >
            >"We are true believers in Washington ,
            > D.C. , and this vibrant Columbia
            >Heights/Petworth neighborhood, " basketball player turned business magnate
            >Magic Johnson said in a statement.
            >
            >The Privado, a separate project due for completion at the end of this year at
            > 1443 Chapin St. NW ,
            >consists of 16 condominiums a half-block from
            > Meridian Hill
            > Park . It is being built
            >by Drummond Development, which has specialized in revitalizing
            > Washington
            >neighborhoods.
            >
            >The Allegro apartments and retail space are going up at
            > 3460 14th St. NW with a completion date
            >scheduled for 2009.
            >
            > Kenyon Square
            >condominiums at 14th and Kenyon streets Northwest opened in 2007.
            >
            >In other news ...
            >
            >c Federal Realty Investment Trust yesterday said it is opening the ninth phase
            >of Bethesda Row, a seven-block redevelopment of downtown
            > Bethesda with retail, residences and office
            >space.
            >
            >The most recent segment includes 43,000 square feet of boutique stores and
            >restaurants, 180 apartments and 244 parking spaces. They were built on the
            >1.7-acre site of a former Giant Food store.
            >
            >The latest development adds to the existing 477,000 square feet of redeveloped
            >space in Bethesda Row that includes retailers such as a Barnes & Noble
            >outlet, an Apple Store and Discovery Galleries.
            >
            >• Property Lines runs on Thursdays.
            >Call Tom Ramstack at 202/636-3180 or e-mail tramstack @ washington times.com.
            >
            >
            >
            >----------- --------- --------- -------
            >
            >To unsubscribe, email WardOneDC-unsubscri be@yahoogroups. com
            >
            >Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >



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          • Lou Muscarella
            When I search MLS (multiple listing service) for all of DC (NE, NW, SE,SW) and use the criteria of less than $250,000, this is what I come up with: Total
            Message 5 of 12 , May 9 11:02 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              When I search MLS (multiple listing service) for all of DC (NE, NW, SE,SW) and use the criteria of less than $250,000, this is what I come up with:

              Total available housing units under $250,000 in price for sale = 685

              Break down per property type:
              399 condominiums
              228 row homes, single family, detached, etc
              58  co-op's

              Granted some are shells and uninhabitable. Even if you took out 50% of them, that still leaves well over 300 available "affordable" housing units.

              Other info, if you are interested..

              Total active properties for sale = 3336 properties for sale in DC.

              Break down is:
              1358 condo's
              1792 row homes, single families, detached, etc.
              186  coop's

              Total Settled Sales for the period April 1-April 30th = 410
              Break down is:
              188 condo's
              192 row homes, single families, detached, etc.
              30  coop's

              Total properties under contract, waiting to go to settlement = 1032
              463 condo's
              517 row homes, single families, detached, etc.
              52  coop's

              This is raw data from MLS and is as accurate as the last updates.

              It also does not include all the developer inventory. They may only list the lowest priced 1 bedroom, or lowest priced 2 bedroom in the building as a draw to bring purchasers in.

              Lou Muscarella
              703-405-3019


              -----Original Message-----
              From: nathan boggs <nathanmboggs@...>
              To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Fri, 9 May 2008 12:53 pm
              Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC

              But if the Allegro project is as bad as you say, won't it ultimately end up being affordable for the working class?  With all the condos coming online, a poorly designed project will likely have a hard time selling.  Or at the least it will have a difficult time selling for top dollar.  In my opinion, the city doesn't need more affordable housing.  I see houses on the market everyday in SE for under 250K.  Why do people feel entitled to affordable housing in expensive neighborhoods? 
              Nathan

              --- On Fri, 5/9/08, William Jordan <whj@melanet. com> wrote:
              From: William Jordan <whj@melanet. com>
              Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
              To: WardOneDC@yahoogrou ps.com
              Date: Friday, May 9, 2008, 12:42 PM


              The Allegro project was designed as a quick flip financial transaction in a hot housing market feuled by cheap money.  It was never designed primarily as a quality  sustainable residential development  as a project nor for the neighborhood it is being integrated into.  The project was designed to squeeze  as many units into the space using the cheapest construction techniques possible.  Padding profits by selling over prices parking spaces.  I don't blame the developer, its his job to make money. The project as all the hall marks of a 60s/70s low income housing project with folk pay luxury prices.  The untils are small and the common spaces poorly designed and the overall architecture crap.  With the change in the market and it becoming rental it will become like a college dorm project. Some units are no more than 15ft or so from the fire station with no buffer.

              The CM, DDOT, DCRA, Zoning and etc. turned there backs on helping the developer and community to integrate this a quality project.  Typical any development is good development.  The government should invest in aquiring the project with a private developer so that it can be retro-fitted as a workforce/market rate housing mixed income project.  Which would mean increasing the size of units and reducing the  overall number of units as well revisting the common spaces.  

              Just my view.  

              William

              Lou Muscarella wrote:
              Do you mean "project" as a plan for an entity or program to manage until it is complete?

              Or do you mean "project" as in a housing projects, where it gets turned into a continuous crime scene?

               Lou


              -----Original Message-----
              From: William Jordan <whj@melanet. com>
              To: WardOneDC@yahoogrou ps.com
              Sent: Fri, 9 May 2008 7:38 am
              Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC


              I will not argue against that point, but I meant treat it something like a nuisance property and have another team restructure and develop it as a workforce/market  housing project.   I would have no interest in seeing it fail, if there was in opportunity to make it a better quality product for tenants and the community.

              Williaam

              nathan boggs wrote:
              Are you serious?  What makes you think that DC gov't with all its incompetence could manage a project as well as a developer?  There is not one DC agency that is well run, except parking.  Hre is one thing that rangs true.  If Allegro is such a badly run project, it will fail.  The market will make sure of that.  The government should focus on getting its house in order. 

              --- On Thu, 5/8/08, William Jordan <whj@melanet. com> wrote:
              From: William Jordan <whj@melanet. com>
              Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
              To: WardOneDC@yahoogrou ps.com
              Date: Thursday, May 8, 2008, 10:29 AM


              If you notice things are moving on projects that approach Transit
              Oriented Development and projects that have been in the works for the
              last 10 years or so finally coming out of the ground. Most the the
              projects were not based in the go-go subprime condo boom, but from hard
              community work. The Allegro project is really to only go-go project and
              it pushed out what was supposed to be a more community oriented mix use
              project (And has not made good on its community benefits packaage). In
              fact Canyon-Johnson in another forum was supposed to be a partner in the
              DC USA project, but backed out.

              My point is that projects that had high levels of community involvement
              continue to march on. The go-go greed project designed to exploit these
              community for quick flip bucks are the ones that are drying up, that's a
              good thing. I only wish there was a way for the city to buy out Allegro
              and turn it into a qualiy project.

              William

              dominicsale@ yahoo.com wrote:

              >
              >----- Original Message -----
              >Subject:Developmen t booming in NW DC
              >Date:Thu, 8 May 2008 13:45:09
              >From:Sale, Dominic K. <Dominic_K._Sale@ omb.eop.gov>
              >To: <dominicsale@ yahoo.com>
              >
              > Interest shines on NW area of city
              >
              >May 8, 2008
              >
              >By Tom Ramstack - Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development announced
              >plans last week for a new residential development in the Columbia
              >Heights/Petworth neighborhood.
              >
              >The team is one of several developers trying to grab some of the last sites
              >available in the neighborhood at a reasonable cost.
              >
              >Many sites in the downtown area have been lost to redevelopment in recent
              >years, until the housing market collapse dried up developers' interest in
              >building neighborhood projects.
              >
              >Columbia Heights/Petworth is one of the exceptions.
              >
              >While developers refuse to even consider new residential projects in most of
              >the region, Columbia Heights/Petworth is home to the Privado condominiums, the
              >Allegro apartments, Kenyon Square
              >condominiums and now the future Park
              > Place mixed-use project. All of them are either
              >recently completed, being built or just announced.
              >
              >"It's a fast moving neighborhood, " said Bob Moore, president of the
              >Development Corporation of Columbia
              > Heights , a nonprofit business development
              >organization. "It's one of the few neighborhoods where there's still a lot
              >of housing investment going on."
              >
              >Among its attractions for developers are two Metro stops, the
              >546,000-square- foot DC USA shopping and entertainment complex at
              > 14th Street and
              > Park Road Northwest
              >that opened in March, a downtown location and a sprinkling of vacant lots or
              >parking lots that are ripe for new buildings.
              >
              >"They haven't had to tear down much of anything to build on it," Mr.
              >Moore said.
              >
              >For the Park Place ,
              >Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development obtained a $53 million
              >construction loan. The complex would include 161 condominiums and apartments
              >and 16,000 square feet of retail.
              >
              >The seven-story building is expected to be finished by July 2009 over the
              >Georgia Avenue/Petworth Metro station, only one block from DC USA.
              >
              >"We are true believers in Washington ,
              > D.C. , and this vibrant Columbia
              >Heights/Petworth neighborhood, " basketball player turned business magnate
              >Magic Johnson said in a statement.
              >
              >The Privado, a separate project due for completion at the end of this year at
              > 1443 Chapin St. NW ,
              >consists of 16 condominiums a half-block from
              > Meridian Hill
              > Park . It is being built
              >by Drummond Development, which has specialized in revitalizing
              > Washington
              >neighborhoods.
              >
              >The Allegro apartments and retail space are going up at
              > 3460 14th St. NW with a completion date
              >scheduled for 2009.
              >
              > Kenyon Square
              >condominiums at 14th and Kenyon streets Northwest opened in 2007.
              >
              >In other news ...
              >
              >c Federal Realty Investment Trust yesterday said it is opening the ninth phase
              >of Bethesda Row, a seven-block redevelopment of downtown
              > Bethesda with retail, residences and office
              >space.
              >
              >The most recent segment includes 43,000 square feet of boutique stores and
              >restaurants, 180 apartments and 244 parking spaces. They were built on the
              >1.7-acre site of a former Giant Food store.
              >
              >The latest development adds to the existing 477,000 square feet of redeveloped
              >space in Bethesda Row that includes retailers such as a Barnes & Noble
              >outlet, an Apple Store and Discovery Galleries.
              >
              >• Property Lines runs on Thursdays.
              >Call Tom Ramstack at 202/636-3180 or e-mail tramstack @ washington times.com.
              >
              >
              >
              >----------- --------- --------- -------
              >
              >To unsubscribe, email WardOneDC-unsubscri be@yahoogroups. com
              >
              >Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >



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            • William Jordan
              I think the issue is to have quality and affordable. As well we are dealing in an inflated market. Columbia Heights for the last 60 or so years as
              Message 6 of 12 , May 9 11:18 AM
              • 0 Attachment

                I think the issue is to have quality and affordable.  As well we are dealing in an inflated market.   Columbia Heights for the last 60 or so years as traditoinally been affordable to middle, upper middle and working class  families.  Equating workforce level housing as "less than"  was marketing used to justify poor stewardship of development in this city.  

                The fact is that the market has corrected and driven out many of the short term speculators for now or at least minimized there impact on the market.  Again areas median income is about $90K so average median family housing should be about  $270K  if  we are at around $400K the market is over priced.   Having housing prices adjust downward is not the same as lowering the quality of neighborhoods, but actually probably improves the quality as less income and wealth  is going into housing and then oversees and etc.  

                In fact its the sucking of wealth out of communities that leads to increasing crime whether the sucking is from the low or high-end.

                William



                nathan boggs wrote:

                But if the Allegro project is as bad as you say, won't it ultimately end up being affordable for the working class?  With all the condos coming online, a poorly designed project will likely have a hard time selling.  Or at the least it will have a difficult time selling for top dollar.  In my opinion, the city doesn't need more affordable housing.  I see houses on the market everyday in SE for under 250K.  Why do people feel entitled to affordable housing in expensive neighborhoods? 

                Nathan

                --- On Fri, 5/9/08, William Jordan <whj@...> wrote:

                From: William Jordan <whj@...>
                Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
                To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Friday, May 9, 2008, 12:42 PM


                The Allegro project was designed as a quick flip financial transaction in a hot housing market feuled by cheap money.  It was never designed primarily as a quality  sustainable residential development  as a project nor for the neighborhood it is being integrated into.  The project was designed to squeeze  as many units into the space using the cheapest construction techniques possible.  Padding profits by selling over prices parking spaces.  I don't blame the developer, its his job to make money. The project as all the hall marks of a 60s/70s low income housing project with folk pay luxury prices.  The untils are small and the common spaces poorly designed and the overall architecture crap.  With the change in the market and it becoming rental it will become like a college dorm project. Some units are no more than 15ft or so from the fire station with no buffer.

                The CM, DDOT, DCRA, Zoning and etc. turned there backs on helping the developer and community to integrate this a quality project.  Typical any development is good development.  The government should invest in aquiring the project with a private developer so that it can be retro-fitted as a workforce/market rate housing mixed income project.  Which would mean increasing the size of units and reducing the  overall number of units as well revisting the common spaces.  

                Just my view.  

                William

                Lou Muscarella wrote:
                Do you mean "project" as a plan for an entity or program to manage until it is complete?

                Or do you mean "project" as in a housing projects, where it gets turned into a continuous crime scene?

                 Lou


                -----Original Message-----
                From: William Jordan <whj@...>
                To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Fri, 9 May 2008 7:38 am
                Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC


                I will not argue against that point, but I meant treat it something like a nuisance property and have another team restructure and develop it as a workforce/market  housing project.   I would have no interest in seeing it fail, if there was in opportunity to make it a better quality product for tenants and the community.

                Williaam

                nathan boggs wrote:
                Are you serious?  What makes you think that DC gov't with all its incompetence could manage a project as well as a developer?  There is not one DC agency that is well run, except parking.  Hre is one thing that rangs true.  If Allegro is such a badly run project, it will fail.  The market will make sure of that.  The government should focus on getting its house in order. 

                --- On Thu, 5/8/08, William Jordan <whj@...> wrote:
                From: William Jordan <whj@...>
                Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
                To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Thursday, May 8, 2008, 10:29 AM


                If you notice things are moving on projects that approach Transit
                Oriented Development and projects that have been in the works for the
                last 10 years or so finally coming out of the ground. Most the the
                projects were not based in the go-go subprime condo boom, but from hard
                community work. The Allegro project is really to only go-go project and
                it pushed out what was supposed to be a more community oriented mix use
                project (And has not made good on its community benefits packaage). In
                fact Canyon-Johnson in another forum was supposed to be a partner in the
                DC USA project, but backed out.

                My point is that projects that had high levels of community involvement
                continue to march on. The go-go greed project designed to exploit these
                community for quick flip bucks are the ones that are drying up, that's a
                good thing. I only wish there was a way for the city to buy out Allegro
                and turn it into a qualiy project.

                William

                dominicsale@ yahoo.com wrote:

                >
                >----- Original Message -----
                >Subject:Developmen t booming in NW DC
                >Date:Thu, 8 May 2008 13:45:09
                >From:Sale, Dominic K. <Dominic_K._Sale@ omb.eop.gov>
                >To: <dominicsale@ yahoo.com>
                >
                > Interest shines on NW area of city
                >
                >May 8, 2008
                >
                >By Tom Ramstack - Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development announced
                >plans last week for a new residential development in the Columbia
                >Heights/Petworth neighborhood.
                >
                >The team is one of several developers trying to grab some of the last sites
                >available in the neighborhood at a reasonable cost.
                >
                >Many sites in the downtown area have been lost to redevelopment in recent
                >years, until the housing market collapse dried up developers' interest in
                >building neighborhood projects.
                >
                >Columbia Heights/Petworth is one of the exceptions.
                >
                >While developers refuse to even consider new residential projects in most of
                >the region, Columbia Heights/Petworth is home to the Privado condominiums, the
                >Allegro apartments, Kenyon Square
                >condominiums and now the future Park
                > Place mixed-use project. All of them are either
                >recently completed, being built or just announced.
                >
                >"It's a fast moving neighborhood, " said Bob Moore, president of the
                >Development Corporation of Columbia
                > Heights , a nonprofit business development
                >organization. "It's one of the few neighborhoods where there's still a lot
                >of housing investment going on."
                >
                >Among its attractions for developers are two Metro stops, the
                >546,000-square- foot DC USA shopping and entertainment complex at
                > 14th Street and
                > Park Road Northwest
                >that opened in March, a downtown location and a sprinkling of vacant lots or
                >parking lots that are ripe for new buildings.
                >
                >"They haven't had to tear down much of anything to build on it," Mr.
                >Moore said.
                >
                >For the Park Place ,
                >Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development obtained a $53 million
                >construction loan. The complex would include 161 condominiums and apartments
                >and 16,000 square feet of retail.
                >
                >The seven-story building is expected to be finished by July 2009 over the
                >Georgia Avenue/Petworth Metro station, only one block from DC USA.
                >
                >"We are true believers in Washington ,
                > D.C. , and this vibrant Columbia
                >Heights/Petworth neighborhood, " basketball player turned business magnate
                >Magic Johnson said in a statement.
                >
                >The Privado, a separate project due for completion at the end of this year at
                > 1443 Chapin St. NW ,
                >consists of 16 condominiums a half-block from
                > Meridian Hill
                > Park . It is being built
                >by Drummond Development, which has specialized in revitalizing
                > Washington
                >neighborhoods.
                >
                >The Allegro apartments and retail space are going up at
                > 3460 14th St. NW with a completion date
                >scheduled for 2009.
                >
                > Kenyon Square
                >condominiums at 14th and Kenyon streets Northwest opened in 2007.
                >
                >In other news ...
                >
                >c Federal Realty Investment Trust yesterday said it is opening the ninth phase
                >of Bethesda Row, a seven-block redevelopment of downtown
                > Bethesda with retail, residences and office
                >space.
                >
                >The most recent segment includes 43,000 square feet of boutique stores and
                >restaurants, 180 apartments and 244 parking spaces. They were built on the
                >1.7-acre site of a former Giant Food store.
                >
                >The latest development adds to the existing 477,000 square feet of redeveloped
                >space in Bethesda Row that includes retailers such as a Barnes & Noble
                >outlet, an Apple Store and Discovery Galleries.
                >
                >• Property Lines runs on Thursdays.
                >Call Tom Ramstack at 202/636-3180 or e-mail tramstack @ washington times.com.
                >
                >
                >
                >----------- --------- --------- -------
                >
                >To unsubscribe, email WardOneDC-unsubscri be@yahoogroups. com
                >
                >Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >



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              • Lou Muscarella
                Check out:   www.housingmarketfacts.com  Lou ... From: William Jordan To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com Sent: Fri, 9 May 2008 2:18 pm Subject:
                Message 7 of 12 , May 9 11:21 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Check out:
                   
                  www.housingmarketfacts.com


                   Lou


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: William Jordan <whj@...>
                  To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Fri, 9 May 2008 2:18 pm
                  Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC


                  I think the issue is to have quality and affordable.  As well we are dealing in an inflated market.   Columbia Heights for the last 60 or so years as traditoinally been affordable to middle, upper middle and working class  families.  Equating workforce level housing as "less than"  was marketing used to justify poor stewardship of development in this city.  

                  The fact is that the market has corrected and driven out many of the short term speculators for now or at least minimized there impact on the market.  Again areas median income is about $90K so average median family housing should be about  $270K  if  we are at around $400K the market is over priced.   Having housing prices adjust downward is not the same as lowering the quality of neighborhoods, but actually probably improves the quality as less income and wealth  is going into housing and then oversees and etc.  

                  In fact its the sucking of wealth out of communities that leads to increasing crime whether the sucking is from the low or high-end.

                  William



                  nathan boggs wrote:
                  But if the Allegro project is as bad as you say, won't it ultimately end up being affordable for the working class?  With all the condos coming online, a poorly designed project will likely have a hard time selling.  Or at the least it will have a difficult time selling for top dollar.  In my opinion, the city doesn't need more affordable housing.  I see houses on the market everyday in SE for under 250K.  Why do people feel entitled to affordable housing in expensive neighborhoods? 
                  Nathan

                  --- On Fri, 5/9/08, William Jordan <whj@...> wrote:
                  From: William Jordan <whj@...>
                  Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
                  To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Friday, May 9, 2008, 12:42 PM


                  The Allegro project was designed as a quick flip financial transaction in a hot housing market feuled by cheap money.  It was never designed primarily as a quality  sustainable residential development  as a project nor for the neighborhood it is being integrated into.  The project was designed to squeeze  as many units into the space using the cheapest construction techniques possible.  Padding profits by selling over prices parking spaces.  I don't blame the developer, its his job to make money. The project as all the hall marks of a 60s/70s low income housing project with folk pay luxury prices.  The untils are small and the common spaces poorly designed and the overall architecture crap.  With the change in the market and it becoming rental it will become like a college dorm project. Some units are no more than 15ft or so from the fire station with no buffer.

                  The CM, DDOT, DCRA, Zoning and etc. turned there backs on helping the developer and community to integrate this a quality project.  Typical any development is good development.  The government should invest in aquiring the project with a private developer so that it can be retro-fitted as a workforce/market rate housing mixed income project.  Which would mean increasing the size of units and reducing the  overall number of units as well revisting the common spaces.  

                  Just my view.  

                  William

                  Lou Muscarella wrote:
                  Do you mean "project" as a plan for an entity or program to manage until it is complete?

                  Or do you mean "project" as in a housing projects, where it gets turned into a continuous crime scene?

                   Lou


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: William Jordan <whj@...>
                  To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Fri, 9 May 2008 7:38 am
                  Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC


                  I will not argue against that point, but I meant treat it something like a nuisance property and have another team restructure and develop it as a workforce/market  housing project.   I would have no interest in seeing it fail, if there was in opportunity to make it a better quality product for tenants and the community.

                  Williaam

                  nathan boggs wrote:
                  Are you serious?  What makes you think that DC gov't with all its incompetence could manage a project as well as a developer?  There is not one DC agency that is well run, except parking.  Hre is one thing that rangs true.  If Allegro is such a badly run project, it will fail.  The market will make sure of that.  The government should focus on getting its house in order. 

                  --- On Thu, 5/8/08, William Jordan <whj@...> wrote:
                  From: William Jordan <whj@...>
                  Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
                  To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Thursday, May 8, 2008, 10:29 AM


                  If you notice things are moving on projects that approach Transit
                  Oriented Development and projects that have been in the works for the
                  last 10 years or so finally coming out of the ground. Most the the
                  projects were not based in the go-go subprime condo boom, but from hard
                  community work. The Allegro project is really to only go-go project and
                  it pushed out what was supposed to be a more community oriented mix use
                  project (And has not made good on its community benefits packaage). In
                  fact Canyon-Johnson in another forum was supposed to be a partner in the
                  DC USA project, but backed out.

                  My point is that projects that had high levels of community involvement
                  continue to march on. The go-go greed project designed to exploit these
                  community for quick flip bucks are the ones that are drying up, that's a
                  good thing. I only wish there was a way for the city to buy out Allegro
                  and turn it into a qualiy project.

                  William

                  dominicsale@ yahoo.com wrote:

                  >
                  >----- Original Message -----
                  >Subject:Developmen t booming in NW DC
                  >Date:Thu, 8 May 2008 13:45:09
                  >From:Sale, Dominic K. <Dominic_K._Sale@ omb.eop.gov>
                  >To: <dominicsale@ yahoo.com>
                  >
                  > Interest shines on NW area of city
                  >
                  >May 8, 2008
                  >
                  >By Tom Ramstack - Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development announced
                  >plans last week for a new residential development in the Columbia
                  >Heights/Petworth neighborhood.
                  >
                  >The team is one of several developers trying to grab some of the last sites
                  >available in the neighborhood at a reasonable cost.
                  >
                  >Many sites in the downtown area have been lost to redevelopment in recent
                  >years, until the housing market collapse dried up developers' interest in
                  >building neighborhood projects.
                  >
                  >Columbia Heights/Petworth is one of the exceptions.
                  >
                  >While developers refuse to even consider new residential projects in most of
                  >the region, Columbia Heights/Petworth is home to the Privado condominiums, the
                  >Allegro apartments, Kenyon Square
                  >condominiums and now the future Park
                  > Place mixed-use project. All of them are either
                  >recently completed, being built or just announced.
                  >
                  >"It's a fast moving neighborhood, " said Bob Moore, president of the
                  >Development Corporation of Columbia
                  > Heights , a nonprofit business development
                  >organization. "It's one of the few neighborhoods where there's still a lot
                  >of housing investment going on."
                  >
                  >Among its attractions for developers are two Metro stops, the
                  >546,000-square- foot DC USA shopping and entertainment complex at
                  > 14th Street and
                  > Park Road Northwest
                  >that opened in March, a downtown location and a sprinkling of vacant lots or
                  >parking lots that are ripe for new buildings.
                  >
                  >"They haven't had to tear down much of anything to build on it," Mr.
                  >Moore said.
                  >
                  >For the Park Place ,
                  >Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development obtained a $53 million
                  >construction loan. The complex would include 161 condominiums and apartments
                  >and 16,000 square feet of retail.
                  >
                  >The seven-story building is expected to be finished by July 2009 over the
                  >Georgia Avenue/Petworth Metro station, only one block from DC USA.
                  >
                  >"We are true believers in Washington ,
                  > D.C. , and this vibrant Columbia
                  >Heights/Petworth neighborhood, " basketball player turned business magnate
                  >Magic Johnson said in a statement.
                  >
                  >The Privado, a separate project due for completion at the end of this year at
                  > 1443 Chapin St. NW ,
                  >consists of 16 condominiums a half-block from
                  > Meridian Hill
                  > Park . It is being built
                  >by Drummond Development, which has specialized in revitalizing
                  > Washington
                  >neighborhoods.
                  >
                  >The Allegro apartments and retail space are going up at
                  > 3460 14th St. NW with a completion date
                  >scheduled for 2009.
                  >
                  > Kenyon Square
                  >condominiums at 14th and Kenyon streets Northwest opened in 2007.
                  >
                  >In other news ...
                  >
                  >c Federal Realty Investment Trust yesterday said it is opening the ninth phase
                  >of Bethesda Row, a seven-block redevelopment of downtown
                  > Bethesda with retail, residences and office
                  >space.
                  >
                  >The most recent segment includes 43,000 square feet of boutique stores and
                  >restaurants, 180 apartments and 244 parking spaces. They were built on the
                  >1.7-acre site of a former Giant Food store.
                  >
                  >The latest development adds to the existing 477,000 square feet of redeveloped
                  >space in Bethesda Row that includes retailers such as a Barnes & Noble
                  >outlet, an Apple Store and Discovery Galleries.
                  >
                  >• Property Lines runs on Thursdays.
                  >Call Tom Ramstack at 202/636-3180 or e-mail tramstack @ washington times.com.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >----------- --------- --------- -------
                  >
                  >To unsubscribe, email WardOneDC-unsubscri be@yahoogroups. com
                  >
                  >Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >



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                • William Jordan
                  Price is to simple a search to understand the market and judge the quality of a project. Allegro switched from condo to rental. This adjusts the developers
                  Message 8 of 12 , May 9 11:55 AM
                  • 0 Attachment

                    Price is to simple a search to understand the market and judge the quality of a project.  Allegro switched from condo to rental.   This adjusts the developers interest from facade quality to real quality in the development, because they have to stay and repead the consequences of the project on community fabric.

                    What we don't get is most housing at least in the Columbia Heights is subsidized by the city one way or another.  There is really no such thing a "market" in the true since.  The city subsidized and allowed luxury ghetto projects like Allegro as a lost leaders to getting increased income taxes and luxury spending.  However, if the cost of  housing gets too high those dollars go into paying debt and the debt is held overseas and the District does not benefit as much from its investment.  

                    I guess my point is that the key to the quaility of a project is its net contribution to the strengthtening of the social/civic fabric.  We tend to use income and real estate prices as a short hand for strengthening of the social/civic fabric, but we are finding out that  this short hand is flawed.  I am hope that the city can intervene and help Allegro become a net plus contributor.

                    William


                    Lou Muscarella wrote:
                    When I search MLS (multiple listing service) for all of DC (NE, NW, SE,SW) and use the criteria of less than $250,000, this is what I come up with:

                    Total available housing units under $250,000 in price for sale = 685

                    Break down per property type:
                    399 condominiums
                    228 row homes, single family, detached, etc
                    58  co-op's

                    Granted some are shells and uninhabitable. Even if you took out 50% of them, that still leaves well over 300 available "affordable" housing units.

                    Other info, if you are interested..

                    Total active properties for sale = 3336 properties for sale in DC.

                    Break down is:
                    1358 condo's
                    1792 row homes, single families, detached, etc.
                    186  coop's

                    Total Settled Sales for the period April 1-April 30th = 410
                    Break down is:
                    188 condo's
                    192 row homes, single families, detached, etc.
                    30  coop's

                    Total properties under contract, waiting to go to settlement = 1032
                    463 condo's
                    517 row homes, single families, detached, etc.
                    52  coop's

                    This is raw data from MLS and is as accurate as the last updates.

                    It also does not include all the developer inventory. They may only list the lowest priced 1 bedroom, or lowest priced 2 bedroom in the building as a draw to bring purchasers in.

                    Lou Muscarella
                    703-405-3019


                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: nathan boggs <nathanmboggs@...>
                    To: WardOneDC@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Fri, 9 May 2008 12:53 pm
                    Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC

                    But if the Allegro project is as bad as you say, won't it ultimately end up being affordable for the working class?  With all the condos coming online, a poorly designed project will likely have a hard time selling.  Or at the least it will have a difficult time selling for top dollar.  In my opinion, the city doesn't need more affordable housing.  I see houses on the market everyday in SE for under 250K.  Why do people feel entitled to affordable housing in expensive neighborhoods? 
                    Nathan

                    --- On Fri, 5/9/08, William Jordan <whj@melanet. com> wrote:
                    From: William Jordan <whj@melanet. com>
                    Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
                    To: WardOneDC@yahoogrou ps.com
                    Date: Friday, May 9, 2008, 12:42 PM


                    The Allegro project was designed as a quick flip financial transaction in a hot housing market feuled by cheap money.  It was never designed primarily as a quality  sustainable residential development  as a project nor for the neighborhood it is being integrated into.  The project was designed to squeeze  as many units into the space using the cheapest construction techniques possible.  Padding profits by selling over prices parking spaces.  I don't blame the developer, its his job to make money. The project as all the hall marks of a 60s/70s low income housing project with folk pay luxury prices.  The untils are small and the common spaces poorly designed and the overall architecture crap.  With the change in the market and it becoming rental it will become like a college dorm project. Some units are no more than 15ft or so from the fire station with no buffer.

                    The CM, DDOT, DCRA, Zoning and etc. turned there backs on helping the developer and community to integrate this a quality project.  Typical any development is good development.  The government should invest in aquiring the project with a private developer so that it can be retro-fitted as a workforce/market rate housing mixed income project.  Which would mean increasing the size of units and reducing the  overall number of units as well revisting the common spaces.  

                    Just my view.  

                    William

                    Lou Muscarella wrote:
                    Do you mean "project" as a plan for an entity or program to manage until it is complete?

                    Or do you mean "project" as in a housing projects, where it gets turned into a continuous crime scene?

                     Lou


                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: William Jordan <whj@melanet. com>
                    To: WardOneDC@yahoogrou ps.com
                    Sent: Fri, 9 May 2008 7:38 am
                    Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC


                    I will not argue against that point, but I meant treat it something like a nuisance property and have another team restructure and develop it as a workforce/market  housing project.   I would have no interest in seeing it fail, if there was in opportunity to make it a better quality product for tenants and the community.

                    Williaam

                    nathan boggs wrote:
                    Are you serious?  What makes you think that DC gov't with all its incompetence could manage a project as well as a developer?  There is not one DC agency that is well run, except parking.  Hre is one thing that rangs true.  If Allegro is such a badly run project, it will fail.  The market will make sure of that.  The government should focus on getting its house in order. 

                    --- On Thu, 5/8/08, William Jordan <whj@melanet. com> wrote:
                    From: William Jordan <whj@melanet. com>
                    Subject: Re: [WardOneDC] Development booming in NW DC
                    To: WardOneDC@yahoogrou ps.com
                    Date: Thursday, May 8, 2008, 10:29 AM


                    If you notice things are moving on projects that approach Transit
                    Oriented Development and projects that have been in the works for the
                    last 10 years or so finally coming out of the ground. Most the the
                    projects were not based in the go-go subprime condo boom, but from hard
                    community work. The Allegro project is really to only go-go project and
                    it pushed out what was supposed to be a more community oriented mix use
                    project (And has not made good on its community benefits packaage). In
                    fact Canyon-Johnson in another forum was supposed to be a partner in the
                    DC USA project, but backed out.

                    My point is that projects that had high levels of community involvement
                    continue to march on. The go-go greed project designed to exploit these
                    community for quick flip bucks are the ones that are drying up, that's a
                    good thing. I only wish there was a way for the city to buy out Allegro
                    and turn it into a qualiy project.

                    William

                    dominicsale@ yahoo.com wrote:

                    >
                    >----- Original Message -----
                    >Subject:Developmen t booming in NW DC
                    >Date:Thu, 8 May 2008 13:45:09
                    >From:Sale, Dominic K. <Dominic_K._Sale@ omb.eop.gov>
                    >To: <dominicsale@ yahoo.com>
                    >
                    > Interest shines on NW area of city
                    >
                    >May 8, 2008
                    >
                    >By Tom Ramstack - Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development announced
                    >plans last week for a new residential development in the Columbia
                    >Heights/Petworth neighborhood.
                    >
                    >The team is one of several developers trying to grab some of the last sites
                    >available in the neighborhood at a reasonable cost.
                    >
                    >Many sites in the downtown area have been lost to redevelopment in recent
                    >years, until the housing market collapse dried up developers' interest in
                    >building neighborhood projects.
                    >
                    >Columbia Heights/Petworth is one of the exceptions.
                    >
                    >While developers refuse to even consider new residential projects in most of
                    >the region, Columbia Heights/Petworth is home to the Privado condominiums, the
                    >Allegro apartments, Kenyon Square
                    >condominiums and now the future Park
                    > Place mixed-use project. All of them are either
                    >recently completed, being built or just announced.
                    >
                    >"It's a fast moving neighborhood, " said Bob Moore, president of the
                    >Development Corporation of Columbia
                    > Heights , a nonprofit business development
                    >organization. "It's one of the few neighborhoods where there's still a lot
                    >of housing investment going on."
                    >
                    >Among its attractions for developers are two Metro stops, the
                    >546,000-square- foot DC USA shopping and entertainment complex at
                    > 14th Street and
                    > Park Road Northwest
                    >that opened in March, a downtown location and a sprinkling of vacant lots or
                    >parking lots that are ripe for new buildings.
                    >
                    >"They haven't had to tear down much of anything to build on it," Mr.
                    >Moore said.
                    >
                    >For the Park Place ,
                    >Canyon-Johnson Urban Fund and Donatelli Development obtained a $53 million
                    >construction loan. The complex would include 161 condominiums and apartments
                    >and 16,000 square feet of retail.
                    >
                    >The seven-story building is expected to be finished by July 2009 over the
                    >Georgia Avenue/Petworth Metro station, only one block from DC USA.
                    >
                    >"We are true believers in Washington ,
                    > D.C. , and this vibrant Columbia
                    >Heights/Petworth neighborhood, " basketball player turned business magnate
                    >Magic Johnson said in a statement.
                    >
                    >The Privado, a separate project due for completion at the end of this year at
                    > 1443 Chapin St. NW ,
                    >consists of 16 condominiums a half-block from
                    > Meridian Hill
                    > Park . It is being built
                    >by Drummond Development, which has specialized in revitalizing
                    > Washington
                    >neighborhoods.
                    >
                    >The Allegro apartments and retail space are going up at
                    > 3460 14th St. NW with a completion date
                    >scheduled for 2009.
                    >
                    > Kenyon Square
                    >condominiums at 14th and Kenyon streets Northwest opened in 2007.
                    >
                    >In other news ...
                    >
                    >c Federal Realty Investment Trust yesterday said it is opening the ninth phase
                    >of Bethesda Row, a seven-block redevelopment of downtown
                    > Bethesda with retail, residences and office
                    >space.
                    >
                    >The most recent segment includes 43,000 square feet of boutique stores and
                    >restaurants, 180 apartments and 244 parking spaces. They were built on the
                    >1.7-acre site of a former Giant Food store.
                    >
                    >The latest development adds to the existing 477,000 square feet of redeveloped
                    >space in Bethesda Row that includes retailers such as a Barnes & Noble
                    >outlet, an Apple Store and Discovery Galleries.
                    >
                    >• Property Lines runs on Thursdays.
                    >Call Tom Ramstack at 202/636-3180 or e-mail tramstack @ washington times.com.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >----------- --------- --------- -------
                    >
                    >To unsubscribe, email WardOneDC-unsubscri be@yahoogroups. com
                    >
                    >Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >



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