Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Do D.C. Police Discriminate Against Minority Pedestrians?

Expand Messages
  • Dominic Sale
    http://www.wtopnews.com/?nid=25&sid=1050436# Feb 1st - 9:29am WASHINGTON - A year-long study finds that D.C. police stopped black and Hispanic pedestrians in
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
       
      Feb 1st - 9:29am
       
      WASHINGTON - A year-long study finds that D.C. police stopped black and Hispanic pedestrians in Georgetown and Adams Morgan at higher rates than others.

      The review, first reported by Channel 5, was commissioned by the police department. It involved data covering traffic stops and pedestrian stops from February 2005 through January 2006 at 25 intersections across the city.
      The study found that black pedestrians were nearly six times as likely to be stopped as anyone else at Wisconsin Avenue and M Street in Georgetown.

      The Washington Post reports the stops are for jaywalking, panhandling, suspicious behavior, possible car theft, and are done in what study author John Lamberth calls, "a manner consistent with the definition of racial profiling."

      The study also found that Latino and black pedestrians were about twice as likely to be stopped as others at 17th and Euclid Streets in Adams Morgan.

      The study found no problems with pedestrian stops at the 23 other locations.

      The study also identified no problems with traffic stops.

      Assistant Chief Peter Newsham says the department is in the process of improving diversity training for all officers.

      Information from: The Washington Post

      (Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)
    • Darren Jones
      We informed Chief Ramsey of this problem about two years ago at a Pleasant Plains Civic Association meeting. We told him that we (my friends and I) had been
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        We informed Chief Ramsey of this problem about two years ago at a Pleasant Plains Civic Association meeting. We told him that we (my friends and I) had been stopped several times when walking through residential neighborhoods in Georgetown at night. We call it the GEORGETOWN METHOD OF COMMUNITY POLICING.
         
        The chief said that there was no Georgetown Method of Community Policing. We asked that police stop and question groups of young men who were standing in front of closed stores in the Georgia Avenue area at 2:00 AM at night. If we were considered suspicious for walking through Georgetown at night, surely people hanging out in from of a closed store on Georgia Avenue at night was suspicious? 
         
        Darren Jones.


        Dominic Sale <dominicsale@...> wrote:
         
        Feb 1st - 9:29am
         
        WASHINGTON - A year-long study finds that D.C. police stopped black and Hispanic pedestrians in Georgetown and Adams Morgan at higher rates than others.
        The review, first reported by Channel 5, was commissioned by the police department. It involved data covering traffic stops and pedestrian stops from February 2005 through January 2006 at 25 intersections across the city.
        The study found that black pedestrians were nearly six times as likely to be stopped as anyone else at Wisconsin Avenue and M Street in Georgetown.
        The Washington Post reports the stops are for jaywalking, panhandling, suspicious behavior, possible car theft, and are done in what study author John Lamberth calls, "a manner consistent with the definition of racial profiling."
        The study also found that Latino and black pedestrians were about twice as likely to be stopped as others at 17th and Euclid Streets in Adams Morgan.
        The study found no problems with pedestrian stops at the 23 other locations.
        The study also identified no problems with traffic stops.
        Assistant Chief Peter Newsham says the department is in the process of improving diversity training for all officers.
        Information from: The Washington Post
        (Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. )


        Need Mail bonding?
        Go to the Yahoo! Mail Q&A for great tips from Yahoo! Answers users.

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.