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Re: [WarOf1812] Uniform alterations - bastion loops

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  • Sue Draper
    Jim: I am too insensed at the moment to respond, other than to ask one question: What s the measurement of this individual from shoulder to waist? ... From:
    Message 1 of 24 , Feb 1, 2001
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      Jim: I am too insensed at the moment to respond, other than to ask one question:

      What's the measurement of this individual from shoulder to waist?


      -----Original Message-----
      From: yawors1@... <yawors1@...>
      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: February 1, 2001 11:59 AM
      Subject: [WarOf1812] Uniform alterations - bastion loops




      wrote: (condensed from 2 separate e-mails):








      "Gotta disagree with you, honey. First off, it's not right."

      Jim comments: Guess we can see where you're coming from on this particular
      issue. However, it seems evident that you are speaking from the viewpoint
      of someone who is familiar with square looping - although even here, I
      think you are wrong.

      "Second off, it can be worked around by adjusting the loop length and
      distance apart." [snip]

      Jim comments: for bastion looped regiments - 41st, 49th, Royal Artillery,
      etc. - and especially for 41st, which has the bastion looping with the base
      points touching the base points of the neighbouring loops - you are just
      plain wrong.

      The bastion loops are approximately 2" wide at their side points i.e.
      vertically, as they lay on the coat when worn - on all types of bastion
      looping. They are 2" wide at their bottom or base points as well on a 41st
      style loop (there are a number of other regiments which have this
      particular style of bastion loop, as well). Such a loop shape can only be
      "stretched" in one direction so far, before you lose its "fish" appearance
      and it becomes something unrecognizable as a bastion loop.
      The regulations say that loops are to be 3 1/2 inches "long" - i.e.
      horizontally - at the bottom of the tunic, increasing to 4 1/2" at the top.
      So if we follow regulations on the horizontal length, but increase the
      width of the loop excessively vertically (in the uniform for the giant we
      have been discussing, we would have had to stretch the width of all the
      loops to cover over 6" of extra length - in 9 loops, this works out to over
      half an inch per loop), then we produce something that looks very different
      from what everyone else in a 'regular' tunic has... And if we follow the
      "regulation" (which, by the way, is much vaguer for bastion-looped
      regiments than the other types, as noted below) on the number of loops to
      be used, and ignore the "regulation" on what the length of each loop is to
      be, so as to retain the overall shape of a bastion loop, then how are we
      any further ahead in terms of not screwing around with the regulations?

      There is also the plain and inescapable fact that you can stretch the shape
      of the loop any way you wish, but the lace itself remains 1/2" wide.
      Stretching a loop, even if done equally horizontally and vertically,
      therefore produces an "anemic"-looking loop. The center space is bigger
      than normal, the lace looks 'thin'. Once again, each and every loop would
      look very different from what everyone else in a 'regular' tunic has...


      Ms. Draper:"The proportion issue is something I'll cautiously agree with,
      and cautiously suggest that if it's proportion we're trying to maintain,
      adding 3 rows of lacing isn't going to maintain it. Lengthening the loops
      will maintain the look, without sacrificing the regulated number of rows.

      And it's important to remember that they were concerned with symmetry and
      line and appearance. Adding rows of lace isn't going to maintain that: it
      will alter it. I understood that the look isn't just per individual coat,
      it's also the coat's affect in the overall appearance of the line. If you
      add rows of lace, and then stand the guy between two people with fewer
      rows, it's going to look skewed, and if you're going for similarity and
      symmetry, it won't look right"

      Jim comments:
      actually, you are wrong. I've already discussed the effect of altering
      the shape of a bastion loop too much - a person in such a tunic sticks out
      far more in a group than if there is a few more loops down the front but
      where each loop looks right. I've actually seen (as I am making it) the
      41st tunic with 12 loops down the front, it is very difficult to tell that
      there are "too many" loops unless of course one makes a conscious effort to
      count them. When wearing the belts, it will be almost impossible.
      Especially when one takes a casual glance.

      It is also not irrelevant to point out that you can't alter the loops on
      the front of the tunic, and leave the loops on the cuffs "regulation"
      sized. If you start altering the cuffs on the loops to "match" the
      extended loops on the front, then you really are producing a botched
      abortion. The size of the exposed portion of the cuff on the sleeve would
      have to be extended past the regulation length to accomodate the 'extended"
      loops. Yet leaving the cuff loops regulation size underlines the "anemic"
      nature of the front loops - and this would be apparent when the individual
      is standing *on his own*, let alone in the ranks.... "Catch-22" time,
      methinks....

      And, I suspect you are wrong, even for "square-laced" regiments, *IF* the
      spacing between the loops gets really excessive.
      The overall effect would be that there weren't enough loops on the uniform.
      When an observer is regarding the lads standing in ranks, they are not
      counting the number of loops - but anemic looping or irregular spacing in
      the loops sticks out like a sore thumb.
      If one is "concerned with symmetry and line and appearance" then I'm afraid
      your comment that "Adding rows of lace isn't going to maintain that: it
      will alter it" is just wrong.
      Your suggestion, of fooling around with the shape and spacing of the loops,
      is the one that will alter the symmetry and appearance to the most
      noticeable extent.

      There is also the fact that the Regulations make allowances for the special
      difficulties associated with bastion looping. They note that although
      there are to be 10 loops down the front of coats, in bastion-laced
      regiments, room will be at a premium and it might be necessary to make do
      with only 9. In a regiment like the 33rd, where the bastion loops are to
      be place in pairs, they can only get 8 loops (in 4 paired sets) down the
      front of their uniform, because the extra space used up to form a gap
      between the paired sets nixes one loop.
      Small-sized uniforms (some musicians coats being the classic example) have
      fewer loops yet. Fort Malden has a 41st Musician's coat made by a *very*
      reputable fabricator (not me, I hasten to add) where it was impossible to
      have more than 6 bastion loops down its front (it's made for somebody who
      would probably be about 4' tall).

      So, the rule appears to have been: not enough room? take a loop or two
      off. Too much room? add a few on.

      I wish to add that I did not reply to Ms. Draper's initial postings on this
      issue, because I was somewhat put off by the fact that someone who
      obviously knows nothing of the special considerations involved in lacing
      bastion-looped regiments nevertheless could make such dogmatic statements,
      which seemed to be based on experience she may or may not have had with
      square-looped regiments.
      However, this is the way flame-wars get started, and as one of the
      moderators of this list, I didn't think I should be starting one. Since
      Ms. Draper continues to vigorously put forward her views, I felt I now had
      to respond.

      The 41st Regiment of Foot reenactment group strives for authenticity in its
      equipment. It was founded by Dave Webb when he was on the staff at Fort
      Malden and has always had a cadre of experienced reenactors in its
      membership. We research our regiment's particular practices using every
      available source that we know of. We have the benefit of Parks Canada
      research in to the 41st, and we have had members and friends visit various
      archives, including the PRO in London, on our behalf.
      When it comes to our equipment, and coats in particular, all visible seams
      are and always have been hand sewn (and sometimes, even the "invisible"
      seams as well), as is all the bastion-looped lace - not an easy task, I can
      assure anyone who is thinking of giving it a try.

      I would like to assure our fellow reenactors that when it comes to the
      41st, if you see something "odd", like one of our members, 7' tall, with 12
      bastion loops down the front of his tunic, it is as a result of the most
      searching and far-reaching inquiry that we could conduct as to the
      authenticity considerations of the piece of equipment. In this instance, I
      diligently followed up every source of information I knew of for a period
      of many months before putting needle to lace...

      Hey, when you've got 'hard-core' members like Andrew Bateman, and retired
      professors like Ray Hobbs in your membership - you can't screw around on
      authenticity!

      Jim
      1/41st



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    • yawors1@uwindsor.ca
      Sue Draper wrote: Jim: I am too insensed at the moment to respond, other than to ask one question: What s the measurement of this individual from shoulder to
      Message 2 of 24 , Feb 1, 2001
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        Sue Draper wrote:

        "Jim: I am too insensed at the moment to respond, other than to ask one
        question:
        What's the measurement of this individual from shoulder to waist? "


        Jim responds:
        and the reason for this specific measurement request is...?

        We utilize a template to lay the front bastion loop lace positions out; his
        coat front is 6" bigger than our biggest template, necessitating the
        addition of three bastion loops. That's the long and the short of the
        issue, as regards a 41st bastion-laced regimental coat, for all the reasons
        I detailed in my last post on this issue.

        Although I imagine Ms. Draper knows lots more than I do about all sorts of
        1812 issues, when it comes to matters relating to bastion loops as placed
        on a regimental coat of the 41st Regiment of Foot, she is choosing to play
        in my ball-park...

        regards,

        Jim
        1/41st
      • mike dollinger
        ... _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com
        Message 3 of 24 , Feb 1, 2001
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          >From: yawors1@...
          >Reply-To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
          >To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [WarOf1812] Uniform alterations - bastion loops
          >Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2001 16:19:01 -0500
          >
          >Mike Dollinger : writes dont add loops, keep them formed correctly but
          >space them in proportion to the gentleman giant that will wear the coat.how
          >many loops are in the warrant order? say ten,divided into 6 inches will
          >space out fine,put the lower and upper loop on and fill in the space
          >proportionatly. geeze so much about nothing. Has anyone seen Jock Mcgraw's
          >regtimental? he's the stoutest man in the forty twa, quite a celebrity. His
          >sergeant let his tailor make the necessary adjustments needed to make his
          >coat look good, not siily.........I've looked at a few original coats and
          >have found that the individual tailors had there own ideas about warrant
          >orders, particularly when sewing for officers. nuff said!
          >
          >
          >
          >Sue Draper wrote:
          >
          >"Jim: I am too insensed at the moment to respond, other than to ask one
          >question:
          >What's the measurement of this individual from shoulder to waist? "
          >
          >
          >Jim responds:
          >and the reason for this specific measurement request is...?
          >
          >We utilize a template to lay the front bastion loop lace positions out; his
          >coat front is 6" bigger than our biggest template, necessitating the
          >addition of three bastion loops. That's the long and the short of the
          >issue, as regards a 41st bastion-laced regimental coat, for all the reasons
          >I detailed in my last post on this issue.
          >
          >Although I imagine Ms. Draper knows lots more than I do about all sorts of
          >1812 issues, when it comes to matters relating to bastion loops as placed
          >on a regimental coat of the 41st Regiment of Foot, she is choosing to play
          >in my ball-park...
          >
          >regards,
          >
          >Jim
          >1/41st
          >
          >
          >
          >

          _________________________________________________________________
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        • spikeyj@crosslink.net
          Am I missing something, or isn t the fact that the guy in question is seven feet tall going to make him stick out in the line pretty obviously no matter what
          Message 4 of 24 , Feb 1, 2001
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            Am I missing something, or isn't the fact that the guy in question is
            seven feet tall going to make him stick out in the line pretty
            obviously no matter what number or size of loops he has on his
            tunic? Even if his loops are the same size as everyone else's, won't
            the fact that the bottom loop on his coatee is even with the middle
            loops of the guys standing on either side of him going to run the
            effect anyway?

            Spike Y Jones
          • Bateman, Andrew
            ... You re not missing a thing - you see the situation more clearly than a lot of people. Wait until you see the coat, then judge... :-) Andrew Bateman,
            Message 5 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: spikeyj@...
              >
              > Am I missing something, or isn't the fact that the guy in question is
              > seven feet tall going to make him stick out in the line pretty
              > obviously no matter what number or size of loops he has on his
              > tunic?

              You're not missing a thing - you see the situation more clearly than a lot
              of people. Wait until you see the coat, then judge... :-)

              Andrew Bateman, 1/41st
            • BritcomHMP@aol.com
              In a message dated 2/2/2001 4:06:27 AM Central Standard Time, spikeyj@crosslink.net writes:
              Message 6 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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                In a message dated 2/2/2001 4:06:27 AM Central Standard Time,
                spikeyj@... writes:

                << Am I missing something, or isn't the fact that the guy in question is
                seven feet tall going to make him stick out in the line pretty
                obviously no matter what number or size of loops he has on his
                tunic? Even if his loops are the same size as everyone else's, won't
                the fact that the bottom loop on his coatee is even with the middle
                loops of the guys standing on either side of him going to run the
                effect anyway? >>

                Sort of but his coat should still look like the others.
                For that very reason such men at the time usually ended up as drum Majors or
                fluglemen (you can see them easier). Obviously with that height he would HAVE
                to be a marker from the start! :-)

                Cheers

                Tim
              • Kevin Windsor
                What is the PRO?
                Message 7 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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                  What is the PRO?

                  > Jim comments:
                  > archives, including the PRO in London,
                • Kevin Windsor
                  I think you are right. People are going to say holy @#$% he s a big one! I don t think people will notice he has a tunic on! Unless he takes it off. What I
                  Message 8 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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                    I think you are right. People are going to say holy @#$% he's a big one! I don't think people will notice he has a tunic on! Unless he takes it off. What I think the
                    big concern with is accuracy, not for the sake of the public, but for pride in our kits. Not too many of us on this list would wear a tunic that we know is inaccurate.
                    In fact I am in the process of taking mine apart for some resizing and fixing. We want to look good, and although many times I say it is for the public, it is mostly to
                    please myself and my peers.
                    I am also very interested in this thread b/c we have a new member that is larger than all of us. My double breasted great coat didn't even do up on him so we will no
                    doubt run into these problems.

                    With regards to double spaced square lacing, would the distance between the pairs be increased or an extra row?
                    Jim, Sue, Mike?

                    spikeyj@... wrote:

                    > Am I missing something, or isn't the fact that the guy in question is
                    > seven feet tall going to make him stick out in the line pretty
                    > obviously no matter what number or size of loops he has on his
                    > tunic?
                  • John Williamson
                    Hi All, I don t post often, lurking is my specialty, it is the best way to learn, by listening. I am writing because of one inaccuracy I noticed with the
                    Message 9 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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                      Hi All,

                      I don't post often, lurking is my specialty, it is the best way to learn, by
                      listening. I am writing because of one inaccuracy I noticed with the 41st,
                      and hope that some sort of explanation can be offered for this obvious
                      oversight.

                      I saw the 41st in action at Ft. Malden a year or so ago, and after speaking
                      to a couple of members, I noticed that their cuffs were done incorrectly,
                      the seams being uppermost in line with the top sleeve seam, not the bottom,
                      as I had seen on several coats in the museum here in Ottawa, including
                      Brocks last coat, and a couple in my own private collection. I want to
                      state right now that I am not the most knowledgeable in that regard, but
                      like all I strive to become more so. I asked a couple of members at the
                      encampment and received the same reply, that the person who made the coats
                      had said that it was done because it was easier, something about it being
                      too hard to lace the cuffs. I mention this now not to cause a flame war,
                      but because with the 41st and its constant desire to be as accurate as
                      possible, perhaps Jim should look into who does the coats, in particular the
                      cuffs and correct what is otherwise an excellent impression.

                      Thanks and I do not mean to offend, just point out an error on an otherwise
                      good impresion.

                      John
                      _________________________________________________________________________
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                    • John Williamson
                      Hi All, I don t post often, lurking is my specialty, it is the best way to learn, by listening. I am writing because of one inaccuracy I noticed with the
                      Message 10 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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                        Hi All,

                        I don't post often, lurking is my specialty, it is the best way to learn, by
                        listening. I am writing because of one inaccuracy I noticed with the 41st,
                        and hope that some sort of explanation can be offered for this obvious
                        oversight.

                        I saw the 41st in action at Ft. Malden a year or so ago, and after speaking
                        to a couple of members, I noticed that their cuffs were done incorrectly,
                        the seams being uppermost in line with the top sleeve seam, not the bottom,
                        as I had seen on several coats in the museum here in Ottawa, including
                        Brocks last coat, and a couple in my own private collection. I want to
                        state right now that I am not the most knowledgeable in that regard, but
                        like all I strive to become more so. I asked a couple of members at the
                        encampment and received the same reply, that the person who made the coats
                        had said that it was done because it was easier, something about it being
                        too hard to lace the cuffs. I mention this now not to cause a flame war,
                        but because with the 41st and its constant desire to be as accurate as
                        possible, perhaps Jim should look into who does the coats, in particular the
                        cuffs and correct what is otherwise an excellent impression.

                        Thanks and I do not mean to offend, just point out an error on an otherwise
                        good impresion.

                        John
                        _________________________________________________________________________
                        Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com
                      • yawors1@uwindsor.ca
                        Public Record Office, in London, England, where the original army records are stored. Jim Kevin Windsor
                        Message 11 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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                          Public Record Office, in London, England, where the original army records
                          are stored.

                          Jim




                          Kevin Windsor
                          <kevin.windsor@sym To:
                          patico.ca> WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                          cc:
                          02/02/01 12:21 PM Subject: Re: [WarOf1812]
                          Please respond to Uniform alterations - bastion
                          WarOf1812 loops






                          What is the PRO?

                          > Jim comments:
                          > archives, including the PRO in London,





                          The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
                          square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS
                          of square miles...
                        • BritcomHMP@aol.com
                          In a message dated 2/2/2001 1:00:04 PM Central Standard Time, kevin.windsor@sympatico.ca writes:
                          Message 12 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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                            In a message dated 2/2/2001 1:00:04 PM Central Standard Time,
                            kevin.windsor@... writes:

                            << What is the PRO?

                            > Jim comments:
                            > archives, including the PRO in London,
                            >>

                            The Public Records Office
                          • yawors1@uwindsor.ca
                            [snip] I am writing because of one inaccuracy I noticed with the 41st, and hope that some sort of explanation can be offered for this obvious oversight. I
                            Message 13 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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                              "[snip] I am writing because of one inaccuracy I noticed with the 41st, and
                              hope that some sort of explanation can be offered for this obvious
                              oversight."

                              "I saw the 41st in action [snip] I noticed that their cuffs were done
                              incorrectly, the seams being uppermost in line with the top sleeve seam,
                              not the bottom, [snip] "

                              "Thanks and I do not mean to offend, just point out an error on an
                              otherwise good impresion."

                              "John"

                              Jim writes:
                              No offence taken, it's a very fair question - and very observant of you!
                              As I am probably the fabricator of most of the coats John observed, I would
                              say first off that the difficulty with the bastion shape on a 41st coat is
                              that the points of the sides and base of each loop must come as close as
                              possible to touching each other.
                              This fact, coupled with the fact that the lace is hand-sewn on while the
                              cuff is still off the sleeve, leaves the fabricator with two options:
                              1) work the loops on in a position where the cuff seam will line up with
                              the 'bottom' arm seam (where it is on Brock's coat), which I will call the
                              "normal" position, and which will require some fiddling with the bastion
                              loop shape as described below;
                              2) work the loops on in the position John observed on some of the 41st
                              repro coats he saw - which means one "regular" "symmetrical" loop on one
                              side of the cuff piece (cuff seam still not sewn together) and three
                              "regular" loops on the other.

                              Option #1: The cuff piece has a slight angle to it in its mid point, this
                              is the point that should lie on the seam line of one side of the arm; the
                              other seam of the arm is where the cuff's own seam lies.
                              The slight angle in the mid-point of the cuff forces the two bastion loops
                              on either side of it in to a "collision" on their side points (the base
                              points of course present no problem). There is just the one loop on one
                              side of this mid-point line; the other side has three loops.
                              Altering the two loops that abut the mid-point line is complicated because
                              of the other two loops - you either put all the alteration in to the
                              'abutting' loops and leave the other two as symmetrical and regular, or you
                              try and spread the alteration out a bit over all 4. Neither option is
                              entirely visually satisfactory: one results in two "symmetrical" loops with
                              two distorted ones in obvious proximity; the other alters all 4 but to a
                              lesser extent...

                              option #2: you sew the symmetrical loops on, then sew the cuff seam
                              together. This is easier to do and the individual symmetrical loops look
                              better. You have the cuff seam to fiddle with in matching the abutting
                              loops - somehow, it just seems to work out.

                              However, either option is certainly 'do-able' from a practical point of
                              view. I have in fact done both, and while I personally prefer option #2 it
                              is of course *not* an "option" if it is historically incorrect.

                              Although I do not have them in front of me and therefore can't indicate
                              exact pages & illustrations (I'm at my office, they're at home) my memory
                              is that a careful study of the Steppler uniform articles showed cuffs with
                              the seam in either position i.e lying on the top or bottom seam of the
                              arms. On that basis, I've most often used "option #2"...

                              Hope this answers John's question...

                              Jim
                              1/41
                            • HQ93rd@aol.com
                              Message 14 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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                                << << Am I missing something, or isn't the fact that the guy in question is
                                seven feet tall going to make him stick out in the line pretty
                                obviously no matter what number or size of loops he has on his
                                tunic? Even if his loops are the same size as everyone else's, won't
                                the fact that the bottom loop on his coatee is even with the middle
                                loops of the guys standing on either side of him going to run the
                                effect anyway? >>
                                >>

                                I will have to dig it out, and I don't feel like it right now (nyaaaa) but I
                                recall there being something on the 93rd whilst on station in South Africa
                                being noted by one IG that some of the mens coats were cut too short in the
                                front and could only take 8 or 9 loops and buttons instead of the required
                                ten. That's what comes of being waaaaaaay down under I suppose....

                                B
                                93rd SHRoFLHU
                                THE Thin Red Line
                                www.93rdhighlanders.com
                              • fullerfamily@sprintmail.com
                                ... Kevin and List, the PRO is on line. http://catalogue.pro.gov.uk/ListInt/default.asp You can search for records from our time period of interest, as well as
                                Message 15 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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                                  --- In WarOf1812@y..., Kevin Windsor <kevin.windsor@s...> wrote:
                                  > What is the PRO?

                                  Kevin and List, the PRO is on line.

                                  http://catalogue.pro.gov.uk/ListInt/default.asp

                                  You can search for records from our time period of interest, as well
                                  as of many others, but beware, the military records weren't
                                  rationalised until much later (1850s?), so many things are quite hard
                                  to find, and may not be catalogued properly, necessitating a visit
                                  there to find it yourself, preferably with a laptop to transcribe
                                  what you read, as there is not much chance to photocopy original
                                  documents, due to fragility and concerns about fading.

                                  Still, it's quite a thrill to open a book nobody else has looked at
                                  in almost 200 years!

                                  Roger
                                  3/95th (Rifles)

                                  TODAY IN RIFLE BRIGADE HISTORY:
                                  2 February 1814.-4 Cos. 1st, 2nd and 3rd Bns. at assault and capture
                                  of MERXEM; 3 Riflemen killed, 4 officers and 6 Riflemen wounded.
                                • mike dollinger
                                  ... _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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                                    >From: spikeyj@...
                                    >Reply-To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                                    >To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                                    >Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Uniform alterations - bastion loops
                                    >Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 00:28:44 -0500 (EST)
                                    >
                                    >Am I missing something, or isn't the fact that the guy in question is
                                    >seven feet tall going to make him stick out in the line pretty
                                    >obviously no matter what number or size of loops he has on his
                                    >tunic? Even if his loops are the same size as everyone else's, won't
                                    >the fact that the bottom loop on his coatee is even with the middle
                                    >loops of the guys standing on either side of him going to run the
                                    >effect anyway?
                                    >
                                    >Spike Y Jones
                                    >He'll need to find a red deer or something to lead around. :) what do you
                                    >say Mcdonald?
                                    >

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                                  • mike dollinger
                                    ... _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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                                      >From: spikeyj@...
                                      >Reply-To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                                      >To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                                      >Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Uniform alterations - bastion loops
                                      >Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 00:28:44 -0500 (EST)
                                      >
                                      >Am I missing something, or isn't the fact that the guy in question is
                                      >seven feet tall going to make him stick out in the line pretty
                                      >obviously no matter what number or size of loops he has on his
                                      >tunic? Even if his loops are the same size as everyone else's, won't
                                      >the fact that the bottom loop on his coatee is even with the middle
                                      >loops of the guys standing on either side of him going to run the
                                      >effect anyway?
                                      >
                                      >Spike Y Jones
                                      >He'll need to find a red deer or something to lead around. :) what do you
                                      >say Mcdonald? LOL Mike
                                      >

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                                    • Sue Draper
                                      Mr. Yaworsky: Your email raises several issues, only two of which I choose to address. First, construction, accuracy and interpretation of tailoring: I have it
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Feb 2, 2001
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                                        Mr. Yaworsky:

                                        Your email raises several issues, only two of which I choose to address.

                                        First, construction, accuracy and interpretation of tailoring: I have it on the authority of Peter Twist that the maximum number of loops allowed on a coatee was 10, with a minimum of 8. So, as Tim Pickles pointed out, I stand corrected that there was some slight variation in the uniforms. Peter notes that the minimum of 8 was a provision for smaller men, and 10 for larger. Apparently, variations in numbers of buttons and loops stopped altogether by the Rev war, excepting that which is noted above.

                                        According to Steppler, modern military lacing assigns only 3 shapes for lacing: square-ended, pointed and bastion. Early 19th century lacing recognizes at least 5 (possibly more) patterns: Bastion (2 types entitled flowerpot and Jew's Harp, Straight lacing had 2 variations: the common straightpoint and what he terms a rarer Coldstream loop. "There may also have been another variation to the pointed loop...the square ended loops were also referred to as double-headed loops" (Steppler, Military Illustrated, 1989/90 (22):39). Steppler also outlines irregularities/concessions made for bastion-looped regiments.

                                        Further, he notes that on the 1802 clothing regulations review, "the infantry were to use 10 loops on each side of the front of the coat...Highland regiments...8 loops". "Alone, the 3rd foot guards had nine loops, set in threes" (ibid).

                                        According to Pearse c.1803 as quoted by Steppler (ibid, p.44), Hamilton Smith's Chart of Colours 1812 (p.22) and Koke (NY Hist Quarterly, 1961(55) 1: p.172), the looping on the 41st coats is bastion, Steppler goes further to note it as flowerpot shape.

                                        I've done a quick draft of the coatee pattern, adjusted for your large man. I've used bastion loops in a flowerpot shape and which conform to the graduation in size from 3.5" to 4.5" in length, and are approximately 2 inches in width at the medial (lapel) edge. A coatee with a measurement of 30 inches from shoulder to waist takes 10 bastion-flowerpot loops of lace, with less than 1/4" between loops at the medial edge. At 27" from the shoulder, it takes 9, with the medial loops touching (ie no space between loops). Perhaps the problem lies with the template for the bastion loops not being wide enough at the lapel edge. When straight edge looping is what the tailor is familiar with, it's not unusual to try to get the two inside edges of the lacing to touch and flange outward only at the lateral edges, or to attempt to alter the looping via the internal edges.

                                        The regulations make allowance for 8 to 10 loops, but no more. Practical experimentation verifies that the maximum of 10 is possible on a coat of this size.

                                        The point is not whether it's possible to fit more loops on a coat. The point is whether or not it's correct and accurate. Clearly, it isn't. I refer to my original point: when we have so little to hold up as concrete examples, it doesn't make sense to alter the detailed representation we have. Surely there is enough conjecture and debate over details in our period as it is, without dabbling with primary sources.

                                        To your points regarding tailoring:
                                        *increase the width of the loop excessively vertically
                                        {sue}: No, I speak of marginally increasing the distance between the medial points of the loop, not the interior edges. Someone with experience with bastion looping will, as you point out, know better than to adjust the interior width.

                                        *Your suggestion, of fooling around with the shape and spacing of the loops
                                        {sue}: No, my suggestion was to minutely alter the spacing of the loops evenly across the face of the tunic. My suggestion did not include alteration of the bastion shape.

                                        Second, to your personal comments:
                                        *you are speaking from the viewpoint of someone who is familiar with square looping
                                        {sue}: No, I am speaking from the viewpoint of someone who's constructed many coats, for different regiments, based on research and practical experience.

                                        * because I was somewhat put off by the fact that someone who obviously knows nothing of the special considerations involved in lacing bastion-looped regiments nevertheless could make such dogmatic statements, which seemed to be based on experience she may or may not have had with square-looped regiments.

                                        {sue}: As you yourself have pointed out, this egroup is a forum for the exchange of ideas and information, and not for personal digs, slander or maligning. I take exception not only to the tone of your missives, but to the attacks contained therein. I have, contrary to your opinion, rather a lot of experience in the research and construction of British military and non-military clothing, as many on this list will attest. This includes construction using bastion loops. Should you be desirous of a portfolio, you may contact me offline.

                                        We are all on a learning curve, and make adjustments to our methods and presentation as we acquire knowledge and experience. Sometimes the transition from the not-known to the now-known is difficult. I appreciate the position from which you are arguing. However, personal attacks launched by near strangers who have little background upon which to base their assertions is unkind and unproductive and does indeed, enocurage a (to use your term) flame-war. None of this is necessary in an educational, discussion-based forum such as this e-group. Please do not credit me with less experience and fewer years than I've earned.

                                        *she is choosing to play in my ball-park...
                                        {sue}: Forgive me, Mr. Yaworsky. When I paid my admission to this game in 1982, I wasn't aware it was you who owned the playing field.

                                        The field is yours, sir. Do as you will.


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                                      • BritcomHMP@aol.com
                                        Ooooo Sue, You have got me all confused now. I dug out what I was thinking of (the 1802 regulations) as re-printed in full in the JSAHR within an article by
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Feb 3, 2001
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                                          Ooooo Sue,

                                          You have got me all confused now. I dug out what I was thinking of (the 1802
                                          regulations) as re-printed in full in the JSAHR within an article by Bill
                                          Carman. Bill is a stickler but some of his illustrations of officers coats
                                          are strange, he shows a Lt. Company officers jacket with 10 buttons in pairs
                                          but a Lt. Company officers COAT with 12! I confess I cannot find a reference
                                          for this in the text, 10 being the most mentioned (I have however found a
                                          reference to reducing the number as mentioned by Robert but not a reference
                                          for increasing the number). I suppose I will have to drop Bill a line and see
                                          if he can enlighten me.

                                          I am going to be all frustrated until I nail this one down now!

                                          Cheers

                                          Tim
                                        • Sue Draper
                                          Oh, ummmmm. I was talking only about OR coats. Everything I ve read says something akin to this is how it was, blah, blah, blah, and then goes on to say
                                          Message 20 of 24 , Feb 3, 2001
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                                            Oh, ummmmm. I was talking only about OR coats. Everything I've read says something akin to this is how it was, blah, blah, blah, and then goes on to say *with the exception of Officer's coats, which* blah, blah, blah.

                                            Does this shed any light?

                                            -sue
                                            -----Original Message-----
                                            From: BritcomHMP@... <BritcomHMP@...>
                                            To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                                            Date: February 3, 2001 12:28 PM
                                            Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Uniform alterations - bastion loops


                                            Ooooo Sue,

                                            You have got me all confused now. I dug out what I was thinking of (the 1802
                                            regulations) as re-printed in full in the JSAHR within an article by Bill
                                            Carman. Bill is a stickler but some of his illustrations of officers coats
                                            are strange, he shows a Lt. Company officers jacket with 10 buttons in pairs
                                            but a Lt. Company officers COAT with 12! I confess I cannot find a reference
                                            for this in the text, 10 being the most mentioned (I have however found a
                                            reference to reducing the number as mentioned by Robert but not a reference
                                            for increasing the number). I suppose I will have to drop Bill a line and see
                                            if he can enlighten me.

                                            I am going to be all frustrated until I nail this one down now!

                                            Cheers

                                            Tim

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                                          • BritcomHMP@aol.com
                                            In a message dated 2/3/2001 11:57:47 AM Central Standard Time, suedraper@sympatico.ca writes:
                                            Message 21 of 24 , Feb 3, 2001
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                                              In a message dated 2/3/2001 11:57:47 AM Central Standard Time,
                                              suedraper@... writes:

                                              << Oh, ummmmm. I was talking only about OR coats. Everything I've read says
                                              something akin to this is how it was, blah, blah, blah, and then goes on to
                                              say *with the exception of Officer's coats, which* blah, blah, blah.

                                              Does this shed any light? >>

                                              Not necessarily. Basically regulations are written in such a way that you are
                                              supposed to refer back up the line for stuff so they don't have to keep
                                              repeating it. I mean one quite often comes across instructions for privates
                                              that will say for example 'as for sergeant but coat in red not scarlet' in
                                              other words if a regulation is laid down and not mentioned again, it is
                                              supposed to carry through for all ranks. So if there is a reference to tall
                                              officers having increased the numbers of buttons and this is NOT qualified
                                              later in the text, privates would logically follow the same regs.
                                              However, as I said before, the ONLY reason for doing this is to make the
                                              coats look the same.

                                              Cheers

                                              Tim
                                            • Craig Williams
                                              Tread carefully Jimmy, Ms. Draper is well versed in the construction of 1812 soldiers clothing. Craig when it comes to matters relating to bastion loops as
                                              Message 22 of 24 , Feb 5, 2001
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                                                Tread carefully Jimmy, Ms. Draper is well versed in the construction of 1812
                                                soldiers clothing.

                                                Craig

                                                when it comes to matters relating to bastion loops as placed
                                                >on a regimental coat of the 41st Regiment of Foot, she is choosing to play
                                                >in my ball-park...
                                                >
                                                >regards,
                                                >
                                                >Jim
                                                >1/41st
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
                                                square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
                                                square miles...
                                              • Maxine Trottier
                                                Someone was telling me about a piece in The Beaver recently. I quote: It appears as if gun registration is not a new issue in Canada. I was particularly
                                                Message 23 of 24 , Feb 5, 2001
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                                                  Someone was telling me about a piece in ""The Beaver" recently. I quote: "It
                                                  appears as if gun registration is not a new issue in Canada. I was
                                                  particularly interested in the fact that in the mid-19th century gun
                                                  ownership was quite tightly controlled, however, with the Americans in
                                                  ferment to the south, the government did not want all of us disarmed. They
                                                  introduced something called <Certificates of Exemption>. In order to get
                                                  one, you had to apply to a local Justice of the Peace in person, complete
                                                  with references and sponsors. The certificate, once issued, exempted you
                                                  from, I gather, most of the regulations."

                                                  Comments? Is this still on the books?



                                                  Max



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