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Re: [WarOf1812] Re: RedCoat Pattern

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  • BritcomHMP@aol.com
    In a message dated 1/30/2001 9:49:04 AM Central Standard Time, kevin.windsor@sympatico.ca writes:
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 30, 2001
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      In a message dated 1/30/2001 9:49:04 AM Central Standard Time,
      kevin.windsor@... writes:

      << Excellant job! What are the approx modern day equivalents to the sizes?
      Are they easily up sized (I feel like I work at McDonalds)to fit the portlier
      members of the
      community?

      marspubs@... wrote:

      > It is produced in the four standard "issue" sizes, each graded using
      early 19th century
      > tailoring systems.
      >>


      This raises an excellent point. On particularly large persons the front
      lacing on British Jacket can look very skimpy, is there a scale to
      proportionally expand the lace to cover the same amount of the front of a
      modern man as it did on the period soldier?

      Cheers

      Tim
    • Bateman, Andrew
      ... Andrew writes: I will let Jim Yaworsky explain how he went about fitting a coat to one of our latest recruits. Suffice it to say the guy is 6 7 and
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 30, 2001
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        > From: BritcomHMP@...
        >
        > This raises an excellent point. On particularly large persons
        > the front
        > lacing on British Jacket can look very skimpy, is there a scale to
        > proportionally expand the lace to cover the same amount of
        > the front of a
        > modern man as it did on the period soldier?

        Andrew writes:

        I will let Jim Yaworsky explain how he went about fitting a coat to one of
        our latest recruits. Suffice it to say the guy is 6'7" and powerfully
        built: the number of bastion loops on the front had to be increased from 9
        to 12 to avoid the "skimpy" appearance.

        Of course if you are of normal height and the problem is "portliness", don't
        overlook altering your belly to fit the coat by diet and exercise. Your
        body will thank you and you will look and feel better on and off the field.
        I have made some progress in this regard this winter and hope to take the
        field looking a little less like Tweedledum next spring. Those crossbelts
        aren't forgiving of bulk.

        Andrew Bateman, 1/41st
      • fullerfamily@sprintmail.com
        ... Welcome aboard, Jim. I m a bit late coming in on this, but here are my two cents... I should just like to say that Jim is one of the few of us in this
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 30, 2001
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          --- In WarOf1812@y..., marspubs@e... wrote:
          > The pattern that Peter has discussed below will be published and
          > released by Past Patterns, probably no earlier than late Spring.

          Welcome aboard, Jim. I'm a bit late coming in on this, but here are
          my two cents...

          I should just like to say that Jim is one of the few of us in "this
          thing we do" who actually makes a living at it. He is a living
          historian, researcher, author, collector and dealer of period
          military antiques. His research is first rate, and his collection of
          military hardware and artifacts is too. He has many originals of the
          objects we try to replicate.

          If I had to do it all over again when I began the 3/95th project, I
          should have gone to Jim and said, "Jim, here's what we want to do: we
          want to know exactly how we are supposed to look, act, march, drill,
          etc. for 1814-15 around the Battle of new Orleans, and we'd like to
          have everything documented and illustrated with plans, patterns,
          etc.", and for a fee, he would research it all, and present it in a
          timely fashion. But I didn't know him then, so, if I can give anybody
          any advice, that is the only advice I would give: go to a competent,
          full-time researcher.

          Jim is frequently in the UK and all over the US and Canada doing
          research in museums and at the PRo, etc. He has personal copies and
          transcriptions of a myriad of orderly and inspection books, as well
          as many clothing items and manuals from this era as well as others.
          When I think of all the money and time I spent chasing down patterns
          and gear which later turned out to be inappropriate for what we are
          trying to do, as well as on huge postage, fax and phone bills, I
          would have saved myself a LOT of money in the long term had I gone to
          him first. So, if you're gonna do it, do it right! Thanks to Jim
          Kochan, as well as Craig Williams, Keith Raynor and Robert Henderson,
          the 3/95th is a going concern now.

          If there are any you lurkers out there who are thinking about
          starting your own reenactment group, you would do well to contact Mr
          Kochan and have him help you out. But, as you would with any other
          well-trained professional such as a doctor or lawyer, do not expect
          his work to be gratis- but he knows what he is about, and you will
          get your money's worth. Just ask Colonial Williamsburg, one of his
          best clients. And, the HM 40th Foot (AWI),
          ( http://members.aol.com/HM40thfoot/ ), of which I am also a member.
          Mr Kochan was one of the founding members of the 40th, and did the
          overwhelming majority of the original research for said organisation,
          and it shows.

          Roger
          3/95th (Rifles)
        • Five Rivers
          ... I will indeed. I have this morning put in a query to Past Patterns to see about advance promotional information and as soon as I hear I will post to the
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 31, 2001
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            Kevin wrote in reference to the Past Patterns/Mars coatee pattern:

            > Lorina, can you let me know when it comes out.

            I will indeed. I have this morning put in a query to Past Patterns to
            see about advance promotional information and as soon as I hear I will post
            to the list and update the website.

            Regards
            Lorina
            Five Rivers Chapmanry ~ purveyors of quality hand-crafted cooperage
            fine hand-sewn embroidered garments
            historical sewing patterns & embroidery supplies
            (519) 942-2548, fax (519) 941-7627 http://www.5rivers.org email:
            info@...
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