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Re: Officers from the ranks....

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  • Col Sjt Jones
    ... HQ93rd@a... ... could ... about the ... Parade. It was ... shouting ... to ... minuets. ... slightly ... parade at ... In my early days as commanding sjt
    Message 1 of 16 , Jan 1, 2001
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      --- In WarOf1812@egroups.com, BritcomHMP@a... wrote:
      > In a message dated 1/1/2001 4:40:16 PM Central Standard Time,
      HQ93rd@a...
      > writes:
      >
      > << Perhaps the people who will be running the officer/NCO courses
      could
      > include training in enunciating from the diaphragm rather than the
      > throat, so that a commander's voice is not lost to a hoarse gargle
      > half way through a battle. >>
      >
      > Amen to that!
      > >>
      >
      > Yes, its called singing! A (long) while ago there was a programe
      about the
      > preparations for Trooping the Colour for the Queens Birthday
      Parade. It was
      > pointed out that the Brigade Major (the chap who sits on his horse
      shouting
      > out all the orders) go 6 months of singing lessons to teach him how
      to
      > project from the diaphragm and not wreck his throat in a few
      minuets.
      > I can also just remember when all the regiments of Foot Guards had
      slightly
      > different notes to the orders so that, if more than one unit was on
      parade at
      > the same time, it was obvious which officer was giving the orders.
      >
      > Cheers
      >
      > Tim

      In my early days as commanding sjt of the Imuc I was apparently known
      as the "singing serjeant". I suppose both for my elevated voice of
      command and the fact that my commands were usually attenuated in
      modern fashion - and that my singing voice is high. Doug
    • JGIL1812@aol.com
      In a message dated 12/31/00 11:41:05 AM Pacific Standard Time, tlubka@pathcom.com writes:
      Message 2 of 16 , Jan 1, 2001
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        In a message dated 12/31/00 11:41:05 AM Pacific Standard Time,
        tlubka@... writes:

        << Now let the fireworks begin!

        Terry. (taking cover, naw to hell with it. Standing front and center)
        >>

        Terry,

        Suicide would've been cheaper and a whole lot easier!

        JG/RE
      • HQ93rd@aol.com
        In a message dated 1/1/01 4:56:22 PM, chimera1@sympatico.ca writes:
        Message 3 of 16 , Jan 2, 2001
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          In a message dated 1/1/01 4:56:22 PM, chimera1@... writes:

          << An individual unit can decide itself if it wants to have an officer
          from within its ranks or an outsider. If the officer wishes to
          portray himself as a dandy - fine. >>

          As in "fine and dandy"....?

          B
          93rd SHRoFLHU
          THE Thin Red Line
          www.93rdhighlanders.com
        • BritcomHMP@aol.com
          In a message dated 1/1/2001 10:53:04 PM Central Standard Time, kevin.windsor@sympatico.ca writes:
          Message 4 of 16 , Jan 2, 2001
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            In a message dated 1/1/2001 10:53:04 PM Central Standard Time,
            kevin.windsor@... writes:

            << So Tim if you set your orders to Julie Andrews from the sound of music we
            will know it's you okay!!
            ;-)
            Leave the guitar at home though wouldn't want to be accused of being a farb!
            ;-)
            >>

            He storms a trench, gives his leg a wrench,
            His uniform has a rent,
            He ambles when he should quick march,
            He cannot pitch a tent,
            And when it comes to drinking then his cash has all been spent.
            I even heard him singing after lights out!

            High on a hill is a lonely Staff Officer
            Lay hodalady yodelady ho!

            Sorry, pardon! Did someone say something? :-)
          • Col Sjt Jones
            Further to the hopefully humorous remarks I made at the bottom of this, I would like to re-emphasize that the voice of command training to which I referred was
            Message 5 of 16 , Jan 2, 2001
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              Further to the hopefully humorous remarks I made at the bottom of
              this, I would like to re-emphasize that the voice of command training
              to which I referred was for junior officers. It wasn't intended to
              be elegant or to resemble singing - simply the ability to be heard
              and not to lose one's voice. Doug



              --- In WarOf1812@egroups.com, "Col Sjt Jones" <chimera1@s...> wrote:
              > --- In WarOf1812@egroups.com, BritcomHMP@a... wrote:
              > > In a message dated 1/1/2001 4:40:16 PM Central Standard Time,
              > HQ93rd@a...
              > > writes:
              > >
              > > << Perhaps the people who will be running the officer/NCO courses
              > could
              > > include training in enunciating from the diaphragm rather than
              the
              > > throat, so that a commander's voice is not lost to a hoarse
              gargle
              > > half way through a battle. >>
              > >
              > > Amen to that!
              > > >>
              > >
              > > Yes, its called singing! A (long) while ago there was a programe
              > about the
              > > preparations for Trooping the Colour for the Queens Birthday
              > Parade. It was
              > > pointed out that the Brigade Major (the chap who sits on his
              horse
              > shouting
              > > out all the orders) go 6 months of singing lessons to teach him
              how
              > to
              > > project from the diaphragm and not wreck his throat in a few
              > minuets.
              > > I can also just remember when all the regiments of Foot Guards
              had
              > slightly
              > > different notes to the orders so that, if more than one unit was
              on
              > parade at
              > > the same time, it was obvious which officer was giving the orders.
              > >
              > > Cheers
              > >
              > > Tim
              >
              > In my early days as commanding sjt of the Imuc I was apparently
              known
              > as the "singing serjeant". I suppose both for my elevated voice of
              > command and the fact that my commands were usually attenuated in
              > modern fashion - and that my singing voice is high. Doug
            • HQ93rd@aol.com
              In a message dated 1/2/01 4:40:30 PM, chimera1@sympatico.ca writes:
              Message 6 of 16 , Jan 2, 2001
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                In a message dated 1/2/01 4:40:30 PM, chimera1@... writes:

                << Further to the hopefully humorous remarks I made at the bottom of
                this, I would like to re-emphasize that the voice of command training
                to which I referred was for junior officers. It wasn't intended to
                be elegant or to resemble singing - simply the ability to be heard
                and not to lose one's voice. >>

                Yes, but the thing is, even after the jokes, Tim is quite correct. It is
                indeed "singing" as it is the same basic techniques. (Trust me...)

                B
                93rd SHRoFLHU
                THE Thin Red Line
                www.93rdhighlanders.com
              • BritcomHMP@aol.com
                In a message dated 1/3/2001 9:07:20 AM Central Standard Time, sgtwarnr@idirect.ca writes:
                Message 7 of 16 , Jan 3, 2001
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                  In a message dated 1/3/2001 9:07:20 AM Central Standard Time,
                  sgtwarnr@... writes:

                  << What's that I hear? is that you Tim?

                  ....I am the very model of a modern Major General...

                  Sooner or later we all do a little G&S!
                  >>

                  Well Craig, having been a member of the Harrogate Gilbert and Sullivan
                  Society, and having done lots of chorus stuff and various principal parts in
                  concert (Lord Tolloler's 'When Britain Really Ruled the Waves' was a
                  specialty at one time) your ON!

                  Cheers

                  Tim
                • Craig Williams
                  What s that I hear? is that you Tim? ....I am the very model of a modern Major General... Sooner or later we all do a little G&S! Tuppence Craig
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jan 3, 2001
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                    What's that I hear? is that you Tim?

                    ....I am the very model of a modern Major General...

                    Sooner or later we all do a little G&S!

                    Tuppence
                    Craig
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