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Lundy's Lane

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  • David Bennett
    Dear List, Richard, Great account of the taking of the guns.
    Message 1 of 59 , Jan 1, 2001
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      Dear List, Richard, Great account of the taking of the guns. You are correct, despite General Brown's "official" accounts, the 21st did not take the guns by themselves. The 1st Infantry, 150 men in only two companies received orders to attack the British line. General Brown later wrote that he only intended for a demonstration from the 1st U.S. Infantry, however, court martial charges were brought against Lt. Col. Robert Carter Nicholas for his order to "about face" when he realized the folly of his 150 men in a frontal attack. Nicholas of course was acquited of the charge. The 1st Infantry had arrived from Fort Scholosser on the banks of the Niagara as the opening shots of the battle was heard. Only two of the three company battalion (220 men) of the 1st had made it across the River. Captain Thomas Hamilton's company was still on the American side of the shore. Nicholas, without any orders "ran" his regiment to the American camp. When they arrived, no one was there to give him orders, so again without any orders, he marched North to the sound of the guns. Lt. Lewis Bissell was one of the first of the regiment to be wounded, receiving a wound in the leg and saved another wound by his watch stopping a ball. The 1st U.S. was the first to move up the hill to support Miller and the 21st. They first moved to his right, but Ripley moved them to the left of the 21st. The 1st U.S. Infantry averaged 70 rounds per man during the battle, firing "buck and ball". During the second British counter attack, one of the companies "refused their flank" when Porters line fell back. On the third British counter attack, the 1st U.S. charged the 89th at the point of their bayonets and chased them back down the hill. The regiment also took several prisoners from the 89th as well, officers and enlisted men. As a point of interest, the regiment average age was 32 years old, and the average height was 5 feet 9 and half inches. The regiment was wearing both the 1812 and 1813 coats with the new leather "tombstone" shakos but without plates, cords and plumes. Sorry to go on so long. Its great to finally see the American 1st Regiment finally get noticed after General Brown's reports had so thoroughly bashed the regiment's performance at Lundy's Lane. David Bennett, Symmes company 1st U. States Infantry.
    • John Sek
      Hello Group, I have looking for a new e-mail address for Paul W. Schulz. His old sprynet.com address bounced. Paul is (or was with 4th US Rt of Inf -
      Message 59 of 59 , May 6, 2004
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        Hello Group,

        I have looking for a new e-mail address for Paul W. Schulz. His old
        sprynet.com address bounced. Paul is (or was with 4th US Rt of Inf -
        Snelling's Co.) If anyone could help, it would be most appreciated.

        Best regards,

        John Sek

        mailto:jsek@...

        check out War of 1812 site http://www.iaw.com/~jsek


        and New web site http://history.revisited.ca
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