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Re: Digest Number 145

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  • DM Carpenter
    (This response was written while watching the Hornblower flick) Film crews.......hmmmm.....may most of them rot in hell. Unpaid status: I don t mind if they
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 6, 1999
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      (This response was written while watching the Hornblower flick)

      Film crews.......hmmmm.....may most of them rot in hell.
      Unpaid status:
      I don't mind if they want to wander around and take random footage.
      I don't even mind if they want to see a bit of drill or firing, however.
      I am not a slave, and I am not sanitized for their comfort and convenience.
      There were a couple of fairly cute girls from the History Channel that showed up at McHenry last year. many of the guys in the Brit camp knew them and they were
      sociable. A bit of drill was done for them. (I was in the tent with my first, and hopefully last, migraine.) They were not demanding, and they *asked*.
      I have never been pushed to it, but in the event of a pushy 'Hollyweird' film crew at an event, I would attempt to rouse the rabble and would be forced to make gestures,
      faces, and generally screw up the shot. (This may be a generally nasty attitude, but expecting me to provide a service for free is damned nasty.)

      Paid status:

      I finally got used to sign up to work on projects that hire reenactors to 'ensure historical accuracy', then go off on flights of historical fantasy. That is their
      right. My attitude is that I am a military modeller. If someone asks my opinion, I will give it, and it is their right to take that info or not.

      On the other hand, I will not be treated like cattle, and I will be paid fairly. If i am to be fed, then I will take time to eat. (None of this cast, and crew lingering
      over their meal, then beating the long roll as soon as I touch the first biscuit.)

      We do have some leverage on a set. We are a 'unit', or at least a 'unit of units'. There is always an option of telling them to stuff it and take your toys home.

      I have found that the NC Public TV types or the BBC are the best crews to work with/for.

      Brother Benton does provide the best general advice. GET A WRITTEN CONTRACT (my emphasis.

      The rant has ended, and I am toddling off to play with my new 'Home Electroshock Therapy Kit'

      *Notice* No reenactor, or higher form of animal (that's about the rest of the lot) was injured or killed in the typing of this rant.

      Frosted Flakes (appropriate, no?)

      Dave

      Terry Lubka wrote:

      > From: "Terry Lubka" <tlubka@...>
      >
      > Okay everyone here's a topic I'd love to hear comments on. Film crews and
      > our re-enactments. I don't know about you but I'm getting really tired of
      > them. Hasn't anyone learned that a large amount of them are taking
      > advantage of re-enactors. The first time they are around it was
      > interesting. By the end of the season they get redundant. The only
      > production that was worthwhile was the CBC production shot at Ft. George.
      > The things I admired the most about this production were:
      > 1/ Instead of imposing on a re-enactment they used the Ft. when it was
      > closed.
      > 2/ They paid us. Not bad for some who worked the extra day or two.
      > 3/ The director actually used some of our suggestions.
      > 4/ They fed us. They fed us very well, some more than others....
      > 5/ Had tons of equipment like smoke machines, lighting, multiple cameras,
      > ground charges, and latter ear plugs!
      >
      > -Now other crews that ticked me off. Mississinewa 2 years ago a film crew
      > shows up and starts giving orders to the British battalion during our drill
      > parade without first getting our attention.
      >
      > -A crew invites us to Ft. George to do some filming. At first the job is a
      > paying one $50 a day. Then as the filming date gets closer it becomes a no
      > pay but a meal (unknown menu) a beer, and a viewing of the out takes at the
      > end of the day. What about powder $?
      >
      > Well the finished product was displayed on TV this past weekend. I haven't
      > seen it yet but I hear it's CRAP! The CBC production is set for airing next
      > year. If you can judge the finished product by the way it was filmed, I'm
      > expecting an excellent film.
      >
      > Does anyone else have any good or bad film crew stories?
      >
      > Terry Lubka
      > GLI / 25th US / Cdn. Vol.
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > Are you hogging all the fun?
      > http://www.ONElist.com
      > Friends tell friends about ONElist!
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...
    • Christopher Franke
      ... THOUSANDS of square m Salut, Re this my humble opinion. I concur that we are being taken advantage of if we do not get recompense. I don t mean making a
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 7, 1999
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        Terry Lubka wrote:
        >
        > From: "Terry Lubka" <tlubka@...>
        >
        > Okay everyone here's a topic I'd love to hear comments on. Film crews and
        > our re-enactments. I don't know about you but I'm getting really tired of
        > them. Hasn't anyone learned that a large amount of them are taking
        > advantage of re-enactors. The first time they are around it was
        > interesting. By the end of the season they get redundant. The only
        > production that was worthwhile was the CBC production shot at Ft. George.
        > The things I admired the most about this production were:
        > 1/ Instead of imposing on a re-enactment they used the Ft. when it was
        > closed.
        > 2/ They paid us. Not bad for some who worked the extra day or two.
        > 3/ The director actually used some of our suggestions.
        > 4/ They fed us. They fed us very well, some more than others....
        > 5/ Had tons of equipment like smoke machines, lighting, multiple cameras,
        > ground charges, and latter ear plugs!
        >
        > -Now other crews that ticked me off. Mississinewa 2 years ago a film crew
        > shows up and starts giving orders to the British battalion during our drill
        > parade without first getting our attention.
        >
        > -A crew invites us to Ft. George to do some filming. At first the job is a
        > paying one $50 a day. Then as the filming date gets closer it becomes a no
        > pay but a meal (unknown menu) a beer, and a viewing of the out takes at the
        > end of the day. What about powder $?
        >
        > Well the finished product was displayed on TV this past weekend. I haven't
        > seen it yet but I hear it's CRAP! The CBC production is set for airing next
        > year. If you can judge the finished product by the way it was filmed, I'm
        > expecting an excellent film.
        >
        > Does anyone else have any good or bad film crew stories?
        >
        > Terry Lubka
        > GLI / 25th US / Cdn. Vol.
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------> Are you hogging all the fun?
        > http://www.ONElist.com
        > Friends tell friends about ONElist!
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------> The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of
        THOUSANDS of square m

        Salut,
        Re this my humble opinion. I concur that we are being taken advantage of
        if we do not get recompense. I don't mean making a profit only
        recovering cost of transport, meals and service. It is my belief that
        due to the number of persons that want TV exposure this has happened.
        Perhaps one should know what we supply these people and what the average
        extra is paid, for only being present.
        We supply, a proper uniform and accoutrements, knowledge, safety,
        training, and the passion. The extra has to have a uniform supplied,
        does not necessarily know safety, hsa to be supplied with the
        accoutrements, has to be trained, and seldom has the passion. For this
        they get paid. I believe we must stand together as a group on this .
        Someone elses feelings
        Chris
      • BritcomHMP@xxx.xxx
        In a message dated 4/7/99 7:15:28 AM Central Daylight Time, cfranke@sympatico.ca writes:
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 7, 1999
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          In a message dated 4/7/99 7:15:28 AM Central Daylight Time,
          cfranke@... writes:

          << We supply, a proper uniform and accoutrements, knowledge, safety,
          training, and the passion. The extra has to have a uniform supplied,
          does not necessarily know safety, hsa to be supplied with the
          accoutrements, has to be trained, and seldom has the passion. For this
          they get paid. I believe we must stand together as a group on this . >>

          I think that there are two important points here. Either one says "OK I want
          my mug on TV on my terms" and accepts little to no pay but retains the right
          to say "push off" to the film crew, or one accepts the going rate of
          compensation and becomes as much a part of the inventory of the production as
          anything else they have paid for. There really is no middle ground and the
          Director might be good or bad but it is HIS vision that is getting filmed, no
          one else's, period.

          Being one of those who is on both sides of this one I can say that there are
          time when things are great and times when its horrible. I have had companies
          insist that I look after re-enactor honorariums (one could not call it pay)
          and then I have had the devils own job trying to extract the money. I have
          done deals with re-enactment groups (for a LOT of money) where all was well
          until the shoot when some key people turned bolshi and it was difficult
          getting the agreed shots.

          The main thing that against re-enactors is that most of them do not behave in
          a professional manner, the main thin against film crews is that most of them
          don't understand that the 'guys in the funny clothes' actually care about
          what they are doing.

          As a professional in the business I am obviously miffed if somebody with a
          day job goes around offering to do my job for free. But I think that some of
          the best people in the business have come from the ranks of re-enactors. The
          main thing to remember (as Benton often points out) is that it is called the
          film BUSINESS (not hobby) and it is part of the ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY (not
          history study group) have this firmly in your mind before becoming involved.

          Having said all that Chris is right if re-enactors act together in a
          professional manner they will be treated with respect.

          Cheers

          Tim
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