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Re: [WarOf1812] Sickly season's effect on residents of N. O.?

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  • Raymond Hobbs
    ... Lt. Col. Bruyeres of the Royal Engineers wrote a letter to Prevost in Sept. 1813 describing the potential of Burlington Heights as a garrison and supply
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 31 12:55 AM
      dancingbobd@... wrote:

      > A few thought on diseases and their treatment in the first half of the
      > nineteenth century.
      >
      > There was no understanding that malaria was transmitted by
      > mosquitoes.

      Lt. Col. Bruyeres of the Royal Engineers wrote a letter to Prevost in Sept. 1813 describing the potential of Burlington Heights as a garrison and supply depot. His
      description contains the following comment:
      ...the situation is very unhealthy owing to the exhalation of a stagnant swamp which extends the whole length of the peninsula which is at present very severely felt by
      the troops stationed there, nearly one half of their number being sick.
      The 'peninsula' referred to is Burlington Heights, in present-day Hamilton, and the swamp was Coote's Paradise. The sickness was obviously attributed to the swamp
      vapours. The troops there had just spent a summer at the location - first arriving after Ft. George in May/June, 1813. Captain Glegg's report on June 3rd, reported
      that of 1628 troops billeted at the site, only 21 were sick! The luckless 103rd, who garrisoned the location in 1814 had well over half their number continually in sick
      bay.
      There is today in an obscure spot on the site a mass grave of soldiers and civilians who died on the Heights of disease.
      Just a footnote,
      Thanks Bob for your comments
      Ray Hobbs
      1/41st Foot


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