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Re: [WarOf1812] Bandalores-ka Yo-Yos

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  • John-Paul Johnson
    ... Ummm...okay, here goes: The website s info came from a book called World on a String by Helane Zeiger. I think there are some things you can draw from
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 30, 2000
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      Larry Lozon wrote:
      >
      > J-P: It is great for THEIR web site to make claims,
      > my question should have read perhaps,
      >
      > "Has anyone historic documentation that PROVES
      > yo yos were played with between 1812 and 1815?"
      >

      Ummm...okay, here goes:

      The website's info came from a book called World on a String by Helane
      Zeiger. I think there are some things you can draw from those few
      lines.

      The "bandalore" aka "The Prince of Wales Toy" aka "l'emigrette" aka
      "yo-yo" was popular in France before the French Revolution and very
      likely travelled to England and possibly Louisiana with the surviving
      aristocrats and other refugees after the French Revolution (bandalore
      being the ENGLISH name for toy).

      Indeed the sites (http://www.socool.com/yo_hist.html) and
      (http://inventors.about.com/science/inventors/library/weekly/aa120297.htm)both
      assert that the the yo-yo was EXTREMELY popular in Europe at the end of
      the 18th century.

      Even an article by Val Krantz in no less than The American Yo-yo
      Association newsletter
      (http://www.nationalyoyo.org/main/Val-Krantz%20_History.htm) asserts
      that Boney's troops relaxed before Waterloo by, amongst other things,
      playing with yo-yos

      The British "bandalore" didn't become popular in the US until the 1860s.
      (every source says this) This means that the toy was in use at least by
      the British btwn 1800 and 1860. Therefore YES, I'd say the yo-yo was in
      use during 1812-15.

      If you are asking if it was in use in the Canadas, I have no proof but
      one could imagine a toy so easy to make and so popular in the mother
      countries of France and Britain would be in, at least, limited use in
      North America. How could the upper class Brits in the Canadas ignore a
      toy referred to as "The Prince of Wales Toy"?

      My tuppence ha'penny...

      J-P Johnson
      RNR
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