Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [WarOf1812] Re: Stoney Creek encampment News

Expand Messages
  • Chris Wattie
    ... Sure we do! Then we come back for it later ... But wasn t the American withdrawal after Stoney Creek a rather hasty -- if not semi-panicked -- affair? That
    Message 1 of 14 , May 30, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      BritcomHMP@... wrote:
      >
      > Certainly in
      > British service burying that sort of stuff would be quite literally burying
      > money. And every soldier does that, right? :-)
      >
      Sure we do! Then we come back for it later ...
      But wasn't the American withdrawal after Stoney Creek a rather hasty --
      if not semi-panicked -- affair? That might explain it. I know for a fact
      (well, as much of a fact as anything from 1812) that after the raid on
      York the Americans buried the dead (theirs and the Brits) in a shallow
      grave after a half-hearted attempt to burn them. Bishop Strachan had
      them properly buried after the Yanks had withdrawn. We don't know what
      may have been buried with those bodies because that burial pit has never
      been found. But because the bodies were burned I'd guess there wasn't
      much.
      Bottom line is that circumstances and practices probably differed widely
      from battle to battle (and subsequently from burial to burial)
      Chris
    • BritcomHMP@aol.com
      In a message dated 5/30/2000 10:03:26 AM Central Daylight Time, watties@interlog.com writes:
      Message 2 of 14 , May 30, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        In a message dated 5/30/2000 10:03:26 AM Central Daylight Time,
        watties@... writes:

        << But wasn't the American withdrawal after Stoney Creek a rather hasty --
        if not semi-panicked -- affair? That might explain it.

        The point being that if it was semi panicked, why bother burying the bodies?
        With the best will in the world as much as you might have liked you comrade I
        don't know that you would want to join him. And on the other hand if you had
        negotiated a ceasefire to bury the dead (as at New Orleans) you had the
        leisure to bury the dead. However if the battle moved on and there were no
        troops to bury the dead and it was left to locals, that would be the perfect
        reason for them to be buried in full kit.


        I know for a fact
        (well, as much of a fact as anything from 1812) that after the raid on
        York the Americans buried the dead (theirs and the Brits) in a shallow
        grave after a half-hearted attempt to burn them. Bishop Strachan had
        them properly buried after the Yanks had withdrawn. We don't know what
        may have been buried with those bodies because that burial pit has never
        been found. But because the bodies were burned I'd guess there wasn't
        much. >>

        If an attempt was made to burn them I wouldn't mind betting that they were
        stripped unless their wounds were so bad that the garments were useless and
        even then I bet some poor devil was set to cut off buttons and remove badges.
        In the days of hand construction people were far less cavalier about throwing
        things away.

        Cheers

        Tim
      • WARSMR@aol.com
        I saw the Buttons and Flints as well as some material that was there. They will be on display Battle weekend at the Gage House the 49th and a US Button.
        Message 3 of 14 , May 30, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          I saw the Buttons and Flints as well as some material that was there. They
          will be on display Battle weekend at the Gage House the 49th and a US
          Button.
          Musket Balls
        • Craig Williams
          Actually Tim I notice also that a good number of the British dead at Lundys Lane were also buried in uniform as they have excavated actual fragments of
          Message 4 of 14 , May 30, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            Actually Tim I notice also that a good number of the British dead at Lundys
            Lane were also buried in uniform as they have excavated actual fragments of
            uniforms(fabric!). I wonder if it is a case of the uniform being the
            property of the desceased. The accoutrements were of continued value and the
            property of the army but not the uniforms.
            Food for thought.
            Craig
          • BritcomHMP@aol.com
            In a message dated 5/30/2000 7:34:38 PM Central Daylight Time, sgtwarnr@idirect.ca writes:
            Message 5 of 14 , May 31, 2000
            • 0 Attachment
              In a message dated 5/30/2000 7:34:38 PM Central Daylight Time,
              sgtwarnr@... writes:

              << Actually Tim I notice also that a good number of the British dead at
              Lundys
              Lane were also buried in uniform as they have excavated actual fragments of
              uniforms(fabric!). I wonder if it is a case of the uniform being the
              property of the desceased. The accoutrements were of continued value and the
              property of the army but not the uniforms. >>


              Yes Craig you are quite correct, the uniform was the personal property of the
              soldier, unlike the kit. I can only assume that the better supply to the
              Canadas meant that there was no shortage, as in Spain, and therefore a
              soldier could have more of a decent burial. Remember in Spain supplies were
              so bad even material for patches was at a premium. Lace and buttons were all
              but unobtainable, Wellington wanted food and ammunition as a priority.

              Cheers

              Tim
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.