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Re: [WarOf1812] Re: Seeing to shoot

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  • Andrew Bateman
    ... From: David Bennett Marilyn, There are lots of sources for period eyeglasses. I personally wear an orignal 1805 to 1810
    Message 1 of 4 , May 27, 2000
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: David Bennett <ebclemson@...>

      Marilyn, There are lots of sources for period eyeglasses. I
      personally wear an orignal 1805 to 1810 coin silver. I wear them on a daily
      baisis, and had no problems getting an Optometrist to put in my
      prescription. I purchased them at an Antique show over 5 years ago, ...
      <snip>...

      Andrew writes:

      I agree with Dave on this one. A reenactor in modern glasses is an eyesore.
      If you can't find period frames at antique sellers or flea markets, Jas.
      Townsend has a set of repro frames for $25US with oval lenses and
      spring-back temples that wrap around your ears.

      When it comes to getting the lenses fitted, shop around. I'm sure some
      shops will refuse to do the work, but your chances will be better if you go
      to an independent optician's shop not the "one hour" place at the Mall.
      Doug Perry Optical in Guelph Ont. fitted my lenses for me into a set of
      antique frames I bought from a sutler. He said he enjoyed doing special
      jobs like that and charged me the same price as fitting lenses to a set of
      modern frames, even though my frames came without a set of sample lenses
      that he could use as a pattern in his copying machine and he had to do the
      work by hand.

      Andrew Bateman, 1/41st
    • Kevin Windsor
      Civilians are real re-enactors. Without you we wouldn t have anyone to steal chickens and cows from at events!!! ... (and I m just a civilian, not a real
      Message 2 of 4 , May 27, 2000
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        Civilians are real re-enactors. Without you we wouldn't have anyone to
        steal chickens and cows from at events!!!

        ----------
        (and I'm just a civilian, not a real reenactor)
        >
        >
      • Roger Fuller
        ... From: Marilyn Penner To: WarOf1812@egroups.com Date: 01 June 2000 11:06 Subject: [WarOf1812] Re: Seeing
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 1, 2000
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          -----Original Message-----
          From: Marilyn Penner <mpenner@...>
          To: WarOf1812@egroups.com <WarOf1812@egroups.com>
          Date: 01 June 2000 11:06
          Subject: [WarOf1812] Re: Seeing to shoot


          >Thank you one and all for your recommendations re: glasses. I'll check
          around the antique market for an old pair of frames. Perhaps Captain Everett
          would recommend a good source, since he is in my area.
          >
          >As for wearing or not wearing the modern frames, to each his own. If you
          can afford a new pair of perscription specs., go for it (although I'm
          guessing there are few 1812 era frames and that the old frames are Victorian
          to Depression era wirerims) After all, I'm not the one on the battlefield,
          you are. But I don't think you should prohibit someone wearing the modern
          frames just because they are modern. For the movies, it would not look
          right;

          >>but you are not always in front of a camera.<<
          >
          >Marilyn

          Marilyn and List,

          I don't enjoy saying it, but, yes, we are. As somebody said more eloquently
          than I on this forum, we are walking museums, that (ostensibly) educate the
          public. We are always in front of some kind of camera at a public event,
          even if we are not aware of it. If one can't find the proper frames, get
          contacts (even disposable ones) which are available for all eye strengths
          short of catatracts. There is nothing more embarrassing than hearing a
          spectator say, "Look at the modern specs on that guy!" Heck, even buy some
          cheapo repro glasses from Jas. Townsend and get some new lenses put in, if
          needs be. Better than modern glasses which everybody can recognise, even if
          they know nothing about this period or not.

          If one is worried about damaging one's eyes when firing a musket or cannon,
          but the inexpensive repro glasses, but leave the plain glass lenses
          unground, so that the glasses can be used as shooter's glasses.

          I'm always amazed at how people can always somehow get the money together
          for a musket or rifle, uniform, cap, etc. but suddenly cry "poverty" when it
          comes to their eyes.


          Roger
          3/95th
        • lee caripidis
          Oh dear Marilyn, I m afraid I must agree with an earlier correspondent and respectfully disagree with you on this one. You are on a slippery slope here. I
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 1, 2000
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            Oh dear Marilyn, I'm afraid I must agree with an earlier correspondent
            and respectfully disagree with you on this one. You are on a 'slippery
            slope' here. I recall a former member of a 'period' shooting club which I
            belong to. He was a fine shot, a scholar and builder of fine American
            longrifles and had an acceptable frontier outfit of clothing , ....
            ...BUT, he refused to get out of his aviator framed glasses or to
            remove his Timex wristwatch from his wrist. Said it didn't affect his
            shooting so he wouldn't budge. Didn't care what it looked like to others
            or in photos. Sadly, he's no longer with us in the club and all we have
            are the photos with the jarring inconsistency of those aviator frames to
            remember him by. Although I haven't done it, personally, ( I have both
            19th c. originals and 18th c. repro frames), I like the idea of contacts.
            I might even try them one day.

            On Thu, 01 Jun 2000 11:05:57 -0400 "Marilyn Penner"
            <mpenner@...> writes:
            >Thank you one and all for your recommendations re: glasses. I'll check
            >around the antique market for an old pair of frames. Perhaps Captain
            >Everett would recommend a good source, since he is in my area.
            >
            >As for wearing or not wearing the modern frames, to each his own. If
            >you can afford a new pair of perscription specs., go for it (although
            >I'm guessing there are few 1812 era frames and that the old frames are
            >Victorian to Depression era wirerims) After all, I'm not the one on
            >the battlefield, you are. But I don't think you should prohibit
            >someone wearing the modern frames just because they are modern. For
            >the movies, it would not look right; but you are not always in front
            >of a camera.
            >
            >Marilyn
            >
            >------------------------------------------------------------------------
            >Accurate impartial advice on everything from laptops to table saws.
            >http://click.egroups.com/1/4634/7/_/501103/_/959871999/
            >------------------------------------------------------------------------
            >
            >The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds
            >of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of
            >THOUSANDS of square miles...
            >
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