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Re: [WarOf1812] Fw: British Service Small Arms

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  • Len Heidebrecht
    Max, Generally a fairly heavy brown almost construction paper was used, but frankly, that is REALLY tough on the teeth. A good, unprinted newsprint seems best.
    Message 1 of 5 , May 9, 2000
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      Max,
      Generally a fairly heavy brown almost construction paper was used, but frankly, that is REALLY tough on the teeth. A good, unprinted newsprint seems best.
      Len
      --

      On Tue, 9 May 2000 16:34:32 MAXINE TROTTIER wrote:
      >That is interesting. Do you use plain paper for your cartridges? Some of our guys use reproductions of period newspapers. I have run off paper for Bill with thousands of Vive Le Roi! in script running across it. Looks neat scattered all over the field.
      >
      >


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    • lee caripidis
      If I may, ...I have found the almost shiny brown paper which SMALL paper sacks are made of, but NOT the heavy brown paper of shopping bags, to serve best for
      Message 2 of 5 , May 9, 2000
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        If I may, ...I have found the almost shiny brown paper which SMALL paper
        sacks are made of, but NOT the heavy brown paper of shopping bags, to
        serve best for paper cartridges. Strong, but easy on the teeth.
        Lee.
        On Tue, 09 May 2000 21:14:17 -0700 "Len Heidebrecht"
        <lheidebrecht@...> writes:
        > Max,
        >Generally a fairly heavy brown almost construction paper was used, but
        >frankly, that is REALLY tough on the teeth. A good, unprinted
        >newsprint seems best.
        >Len
        >--
        >
        >On Tue, 9 May 2000 16:34:32 MAXINE TROTTIER wrote:
        >>That is interesting. Do you use plain paper for your cartridges? Some
        >of our guys use reproductions of period newspapers. I have run off
        >paper for Bill with thousands of Vive Le Roi! in script running across
        >it. Looks neat scattered all over the field.
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
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        >------------------------------------------------------------------------
        >Remember four years of good friends, bad clothes, explosive chemistry
        >experiments.
        >http://click.egroups.com/1/4051/7/_/501103/_/957932070/
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        >
        >The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds
        >of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of
        >THOUSANDS of square miles...
        >
      • BritcomHMP@aol.com
        In a message dated 5/9/2000 3:40:10 PM Central Daylight Time, maxitrot@execulink.com writes:
        Message 3 of 5 , May 11, 2000
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          In a message dated 5/9/2000 3:40:10 PM Central Daylight Time,
          maxitrot@... writes:

          << That is interesting. Do you use plain paper for your cartridges? Some of
          our guys use reproductions of period newspapers. I have run off paper for
          Bill with thousands of Vive Le Roi! in script running across it. Looks neat
          scattered all over the field. >>

          Officially manufactured British cartridges came in plain paper of two colours
          white for live rounds and blue for blanks (practice, firing parties, etc.).

          Cheers

          Tim
        • BritcomHMP@aol.com
          In a message dated 5/9/2000 11:15:43 PM Central Daylight Time, lheidebrecht@hotbot.com writes:
          Message 4 of 5 , May 11, 2000
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            In a message dated 5/9/2000 11:15:43 PM Central Daylight Time,
            lheidebrecht@... writes:

            << Max,
            Generally a fairly heavy brown almost construction paper was used, but
            frankly, that is REALLY tough on the teeth. A good, unprinted newsprint seems
            best.
            Len >>

            Or then of course one could also use cartridge paper instead (now why would
            they call it that I wonder :-)).

            Cheers

            Tim
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