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Re: Lundy's Lane and other such events

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  • Rob Taylor
    The fact that General Scott was drowned in a chorus of jubilation that follows the battle speaks loudly to the American view of Lundy s Lane. While Scott
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 26, 1999
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      The fact that General Scott was drowned in a chorus of jubilation that
      follows the battle speaks loudly to the American view of Lundy's Lane.
      While Scott recovers from his wounds afterward he becomes a National
      hero, he can do no wrong... Medals, swords, banquets, addresses,
      honours of every kind including a promotion to Major General are
      heaped apon him. If you look at what he did at Lundy's Lane you would
      wonder where all the honour comes from. I'm not saying he was not
      brave, it surely was brave to stand there and get pounded by British
      artillery. (or foolish) I think he let his brave men down. Out of 860
      American casualties 516 were suffered in Scott's brigade. No there is
      no doubt Sean was correct with his views on the "Bloody Battle of
      Lundy's Lane". And Sgt. Pudwell confirmed it with his take on the
      battle.

      July 26 1814
      "Jacob Brown sits in his tent wounded, he orders General
      Ripley to reorganize the troops, feed them, and then every available
      man march back to the battlefield at dawn to meet the British".

      What made him think the british would be there at dawn I wonder?

      Rob Taylor
      ==
      War of 1812 Website: http://members.tripod.com/~war1812/
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