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Musket, Drums & Secret Trails - 1812 Event. Anchor Park, Holland Landing - July 20th

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  • David Brunelle
    Hi Everyone, I have received a late request from the Musket, Drums and Secret Trails War of 1812 event that is taking place on July 19th and 20th at Anchor
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 4, 2013
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      Hi Everyone,



      I have received a late request from the Musket, Drums and Secret Trails War
      of 1812 event that is taking place on July 19th and 20th at Anchor Park in
      Holland Landing, Ontario. They are looking for period merchants, artisans
      and demonstrators to participate in their event on July 20th and presently
      still have a budget to potentially compensate financially those who may be
      able to attend. If you are available for this event and are willing to
      attend please contact Cathy Morton directly at [cathy.morton@...] or
      905-557-0304. For further information and questions regarding the event
      please contact Cathy Morton directly as well.



      Take Care!



      David Brunelle

      SGB 1812

      Project Director



      Muskets, Drums & Secret Trails

      By Nancy Eves

      President, East Gwillimbury Historical Society

      Coordinator, Muskets, Drums & Secret Trails - July 19 & 20, 2013



      Muskets refers to the settlers of the area & the Quakers along Yonge St

      Drums refers to the three Native Bands around Lake Simcoe who marched down
      Yonge St. to help defend York (Toronto) when it was first invaded and burned
      by the Americans. The bands were under the leadership of: Chief Yellowhead
      (Orillia), Chief Snake (Snake Island and surrounding areas south) and Chief
      Aissance (Barrie area and north & west).

      The Secret Trails refers to: the land and waterways trails - Yonge St. , the
      east branch of the Holland River, Lake Simcoe, the Nine Mile Portage, Willow
      Creek and the Nottawasaga River. The length of the overland passage was
      extensive stretching from Lake Ontario to Georgian Bay.

      The idea of an inland passageway to the Upper Great Lakes was a concept of
      Lieut.-Gov. John Graves Simcoe in 1793. He envisaged that one day the inland
      corridor would prove to be of strategic importance especially if Americans
      should ever decide to evade Upper Canada. Yonge St. was completed as a bush
      trail in 1796. At the end of Yonge Street, where the road struck the Holland
      River, was the Upper Canoe Landing and the crossroads of many native trails.
      It was there that a military pine structure was built and was given the
      name: Fort Gwillimbury. This building was made of red pine logs and it was
      referred to in many documents and newspapers as the "Red Pine Fort"

      When the war broke out in 1812, the road was of little consequence. The
      North-West Company was hauling their fur-trading canoes up the road on
      wagons to the Upper Canoe Landing and the settlers were using it in order to
      establish themselves in the northern regions of Upper Canada.

      In 1814, suddenly, Yonge St. became a very vital link to the north. The
      British Naval force, having been out-manoeuvred and subsequently sustained
      heavy losses at the Battle of Put-in-Bay, Lake Erie, needed an alternative
      route in order to continue providing supplies to their outpost at Fort
      Michilimackinac. Not being able to use the Upper Great Lakes due to
      extensive American control, they took to the only other route they knew -
      the inland corridor - Simcoe's route - Yonge St.

      Our place in Canadian history during the war of 1812-14, not only tells the
      story of the interaction of the Native allies who gave allegiance to the
      British crown and the British militia who marched north to support their
      northern outposts but also the Quakers who had previously established
      themselves along Yonge St. between Mulock and Davis Dr. They were pacifists
      and did not believe in taking up arms. When the call to war was given,
      because of their religious beliefs, they were harassed by the government and
      militia, food and implements taken from them and they were heavily fined. In
      some cases, the men folk were thrown in Jail by government orders. This was
      the beginning of the seeds that were sown that gave rise to the Rebellion of
      1837 some 23 years later.

      As a result, for all settlers, it was a time of struggle, deprivation,
      hardship, strong religious convictions, courage, hope and determination.
      Many had come to Upper Canada in search of peace and now being threatened
      once again by an exterior force, a force they knew so well, they were
      determined - that no matter what, they would fight on in order to retain
      their allegiance to the British throne.

      Role of Fort Gwillimbury in 1814:

      Fort Gwillimbury, located at the end of Yonge St. at the Upper Canoe
      Landing, served as a transhipment centre during the later year (1814) of the
      War of 1812-14. Military supplies arrived from York (Toronto) and lay in
      wait to be transported by bateaux down the east branch of the Holland River
      and across Lake Simcoe to the Nine Mile Portage. In the early spring of
      1815, seeing as the area around the fort was far too crowded, they relocated
      to eastern shore of Soldiers Bay and there they began building the new
      Holland's Landing Depot. In March of that same year, the anchor arrived on a
      specially designed catapult sleigh pulled by oxen. It had been commissioned
      to be used on a 44 gun frigate which was in the process of being built at
      Penetanguishene but hearing the war had ended on December 24, 1814, it was
      left. Then, in 1870, a new village park, known now as Anchor Park, was
      established. Two years later in 1872, the anchor was hauled to the park and
      has been there ever since.







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Daniel Copeland
      Dave Are you going to Chrysler s farm? If you are could you bring me a set of the light infantry officers wings that we talked about. And a World War II khaki
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 9, 2013
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        Dave

        Are you going to Chrysler's farm? If you are could you bring me a set of the light infantry officers wings that we talked about. And a World War II khaki beret in 7 1/4.

        Thanks

        Dan





        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Daniel Copeland
        Sorry group, that message was supposed to go direct. My apologies for the inconvenience. Sent from my iPhone ... [Non-text portions of this message have been
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 9, 2013
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          Sorry group, that message was supposed to go direct. My apologies for the inconvenience.

          Sent from my iPhone

          On 2013-07-09, at 15:33, Daniel Copeland <copeland521@...> wrote:

          > Dave
          >
          > Are you going to Chrysler's farm? If you are could you bring me a set of the light infantry officers wings that we talked about. And a World War II khaki beret in 7 1/4.
          >
          > Thanks
          >
          > Dan
          >
          > >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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