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Monroe Mich "Tribal Nations in War of 1812" lecture July 20

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  • James Yaworsky
    Announcement from River Raisin National Battlefield Park: Eric Hemenway presents A Separate Battle: The Great Lakes Tribal Nations Involvement in the War of
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 3, 2013
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      Announcement from River Raisin National Battlefield Park:


      Eric Hemenway presents

      "A Separate Battle: The Great Lakes Tribal Nations Involvement in the War of 1812"





      MONROE, Michigan.— Superintendent Scott J. Bentley announced today that River Raisin National Battlefield Park will be hosting Eric Hemenway on Saturday July 20, 2013 at 11 a.m.



      Eric Hemenway's presentation will focus on the little known Great Lakes tribal warriors and what happened to the tribes after the War of 1812. The War had many repercussions for tribes in the Great Lakes, many of which are unknown. The Odawa, along with a multitude of tribes, fought alongside the famed war chief Tecumseh in the hopes of securing lands and rights.



      Mr. Hemenway is the Director of Repatriation, Archives and Records for the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians. In addition to curating and managing records for LTBB Odawa, Eric works on the repatriation of ancestral remains and sacred items for the tribe, as well as educational outreach programs in local schools, historical societies and the creation of museum exhibits. Eric is a former member of the National NAGPRA Review Committee. He currently sits on the Emmet County Historical Commission, State of Michigan Commission on the Commutation of the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 and is on the board of trustees for the Harbor Springs History Museum.





      Authorized in 2009 and established in October of 2010 as America's Newest National Battlefield Park, River Raisin National Battlefield Park remembers, commemorates, preserves and interprets the January 1813 battles of the War of 1812 and their aftermath. Although American forces were victorious in the first battle, the second ended in the most disastrous defeat for the U.S. during the war; a devastating loss that included mass killing of the wounded. One of the most historically significant event to emerge from the battles was the cry, "Remember the Raisin!" which persuaded forces to fight successfully at the Battle of the Thames later that year. The American victory at the Battle of the Thames sealed the War of 1812 in the western theater for the Americans; however, it claimed the life of the great Shawnee leader Chief Tecumseh. -NPS-
      --
      Shawna Mazur
      Ranger
      River Raisin National Battlefield Park
      1403 E. Elm Ave.
      Monroe, MI. 48162
      (734) 243-7136
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