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Creek war issues - Massacre at Fort Mims

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  • Thomas Robinson
    As a frequent lecturer at the annual Fort Mims event, I would agree with all of what Mr. Westhouse offers; however, and reading the exchange of letters between
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 23, 2013
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      As a frequent lecturer at the annual Fort Mims event, I would agree with all of what Mr. Westhouse offers; however, and reading the exchange of letters between Benjamin Hawkins and the principle players among the Creeks and settlers, the situation is much more complicated. US economic policy is the driving force to move the native population to a cash economy and to establish property ownership and animal husbandry as a means of broadening the power of the Nation. Rather than going into a subject that may not be of interest to the entire list, let me suggest, to make a search in the American State Papers, http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/amlaw/lwsp.html
      a search of Panton, Leslie and company, Benjamin Hawkins, Big Warrior, High Head Jim, William Augustus Bowles, John or James Innerarity, John Forbes.

      I am happy to discuss off list at t_a_robinson@...

      Tom
    • Thomas Robinson
      Sadly, Fort Mims was a family feud that spilled over into front-line US politics. Many of the inhabitants that had sought shelter inside the fort were
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 23, 2013
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        Sadly, Fort Mims was a family feud that spilled over into front-line US politics. Many of the inhabitants that had sought shelter inside the fort were half-blood Muskogee, along with White and European settlers. Outside, the Red Stick faction consisted of mixed-blood kinfolk mulattoes and full-blood Creek. There are stories that William Weatherford (Red Eagle) was disgusted by that sight of family-on-family violence and tried to stop the attack. In one well documented instance, a woman, Vicey McGirth and her children were saved from the slaughter by a Red Stick warrior, whom she had taken in and raised as her own child when he was orphaned as a child. He placed himself in front of the woman and children, telling other warriors that he was taking them as slaves. The young warrior spirited Mrs. McGirth and the children to Pensacola and later to his farmstead. Afterward, he told his "White mother" that he would not survive the conflict and was killed at Horseshoe Bend.
      • Chris Kimball
        An excellent book on the Creek War that came out last year and was edited by Kathryn E. Holland-Braund is, Tohopeka, Rethinking the Creek War & the War of
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 24, 2013
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          An excellent book on the Creek War that came out last year and was edited by Kathryn E. Holland-Braund is, "Tohopeka, Rethinking the Creek War & the War of 1812," from The University of Alabama Press.

          The book is mainly the collection of papers given at the Creek War Symposium held in 2009 at Auburn University in Alabama.

          It is a fresh look at reexamining the issues of the Creek War, such as Burn Corn, Tecumseh's influence, and other things about the war that have long been misunderstood. I would highly recommend it for anyone interested in the Creek War and the causes & issues surrounding it. I found the chapter on Burnt Corn particularly enlightening.

          Chris Kimball


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