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RE: 1812 Re: Pike Drill for Serjeants, Revisited...

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  • Mark Dickerson
    The original posting said With arms, and when advanced, upon meeting Officers, the left hand is carried across the body with a smart motion to set the fuzee
    Message 1 of 23 , Dec 28, 2012
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      The original posting said "With arms, and when advanced, upon meeting
      Officers, the left hand is carried across the body with a smart motion to
      set the fuzee firm against the shoulder."



      So yes, when at the slope or carry, the left hand doesn't come across the
      body at all, but a sgt usually does carry the pike at the advance, so it
      would be the left hand that comes across assuming that is the situation.



      Mark D



      Original message:

      I respectfully disagree that the left hand across the body came from the
      'slope arms' to 'carry arms' movement as this involves the right hand moving
      across the body, not the left..






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Iain Burns
      Tom, I think you are confusing the terms Present Arms with the Salute , which I (at least) take to have slightly differing connotations in earlier times. I
      Message 2 of 23 , Dec 29, 2012
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        Tom,

        I think you are confusing the terms "Present Arms" with the "Salute", which I (at least) take to have slightly differing connotations in earlier times. I have not been able to find a documented command called "Present" for either Serjeants (with Pikes) or Officers for our period (or earlier periods, for that matter), but I have been able to find a command described as "the Salute" used when honours are to be rendered, and yes, when the men are ordered to Present the Officers (at least) Salute.

        If you have documentation you can point me to for either our period or earlier, I'd appreciate the reference. In an earlier email, I posted the link to "The Plan of Discipline for the Norfolk Militia", http://books.google.com/books?id=B0EIAAAAQAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false , starting on page 23 for the Exercise of Officers.

        The question has not been so simple for the Serjeants, and that is what we are now trying to sort out. Roberts says that the Serjeants keep their Pikes shouldered for any motions not described for them, but it may be that they do something like placing their left hand across the shaft of their Pike as a mark of respect.

        Aye,
        Iain
        I would like to ask if you are refering to an officer being saluted by a soldier presenting arms to him when you say, "...officers do not present arms." I know from manuals of the 18th century and following that officers are instructed in presenting arms when in line and in formation with the battalion or when marching with eyes left or right. Please clarify for me if officers are not to present arms at all according to some research as I would like to have this straight for future mention. Thank you.

        Tom




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • shayna121
        Why would the recover be used as a salute or present arms? Chris
        Message 3 of 23 , Dec 29, 2012
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          Why would the recover be used as a salute or present arms?

          Chris

          --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, Kevin Windsor <kevin.windsor@...> wrote:
          >
          > Iain, the best I can figure from the manual is to recover arms.
          >
          >
          >
          > "Throw the pike to the front in a perpendicular position opposite to the
          > left eye, the right hand grasping it at the shoe, which touches the body
          > slightly, and the left hand supporting the shaft by holding it opposite the
          > left eye between the thumb and fore-finger; the left elbow is in this
          > position bent, and risen as high as the left shoulder."
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > This is from "A Treatise on the British Drill and Exercise of the Company"
          > 1816
          >
          >
          >
          > Kevin
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • shayna121
          What I mean is that when the Other Ranks present arms, and the Officers are in formation with the battalion, they salute with their swords. Some may call it
          Message 4 of 23 , Dec 29, 2012
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            What I mean is that when the Other Ranks present arms, and the Officers are in formation with the battalion, they salute with their swords. Some may call it semantics, but we think it's an important distinction.

            Chris

            --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Colonel" <lehrerprofessoren@...> wrote:
            >
            > I would like to ask if you are refering to an officer being saluted by a soldier presenting arms to him when you say, "...officers do not present arms." I know from manuals of the 18th century and following that officers are instructed in presenting arms when in line and in formation with the battalion or when marching with eyes left or right. Please clarify for me if officers are not to present arms at all according to some research as I would like to have this straight for future mention. Thank you.
            >
            > Tom
            >
            > --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "shayna121" <PrivateCannon@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Very interesting.
            > >
            > > Iain and I have been carrying on this converstaion offline, but here are some of the things we've discussed:
            > >
            > > 1) Officers do not 'present arms.' When their men do so, they salute.
            > >
            > > 2) To reiterate, no period drill manual yet found has a 'present arms' for Serjeants armed with a pike.
            > >
            > >
            > > 3) This drill manual says Serjeants are to remain at the shoulder during all other movements, but that would still allow them to salute in the manner described in previous converstaions (arm across the body to set the musket or pike firmly into the shoulder). They wouldn't be removing their pike from their shoulder.
            > >
            > > Do these things suggest that while the rank and file present arms, the Serjeants salute as they would when approaching an officer? The other alternative is that they do nothing, which doesn't quite feel right to me.
            > >
            > > Also, as this is a drill manual for the pike, can we assume that Serjeants armed with muskets continue to present arms?
            > >
            > > I'd love to hear others' thoughts.
            > >
            > > Merry Christmas and Happy Hogmanay,
            > >
            > > Chris McKay
            > >
            > > --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Iain Burns" <iain51hdbw@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > All,
            > > that, "Serjeants remain at the shoulder during the performance of the other parts of the exercise...'
            > >
            > > > Mr. McKay's addition to the conversation re: saluting, taken from the 85th Light Infantry Standing orders book, would therefore only be employed when a Serjeant was rendering proper reverence to an Officer, and not something used when the rest of his group was called to Present. Indeed, the manuals I have seen have a "Salute" for Officers, but again nothing about a special move for Present; to my mind, at least, there is a subtle difference between being called to Present and rendering a Salute, even though one might Salute while others are given the order to Present.
            > >
            > > >
            > > > Aye,
            > > > Iain
            > > > 1st Royal Scots, No. 3 (Centre) Coy
            > >
            >
          • Kevin Windsor
            From the standing orders of the 85th. Whenever a Non-Commissioned Officer, Bugler, or Private has an occasion to address an Officer, give a report, &c, - if
            Message 5 of 23 , Dec 29, 2012
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              From the standing orders of the 85th.



              "Whenever a Non-Commissioned Officer, Bugler, or Private has an occasion to
              address an Officer, give a report, &c, - if with arms, he raises his right
              hand, in the manner above described, to his cap, drops it to the Attention
              position, and raises it once more on leaving the Officer; if with arms he
              RECOVERS first, returns to the Carry, and only RECOVERS again when parting
              with the Officer"



              From "A Treatise on the British Drill and the Exercise of the Company" 1816



              "It is in the position of RECOVER ARMS that a soldier, when with his
              firelock, is at all times to address himself and speak to an officer; and it
              is likewise this position which is taken when the command Recover Arms is
              given as a preparative to the dismissal of a body of men;"



              Kevin



              From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
              Of shayna121





              Why would the recover be used as a salute or present arms?

              Chris






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Kevin Windsor
              There is nothing in the Exercise of the Pike that shows Advance Arms for the pike. Kevin From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com]
              Message 6 of 23 , Dec 29, 2012
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                There is nothing in the "Exercise of the Pike" that shows "Advance Arms" for
                the pike.



                Kevin



                From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                Of Mark Dickerson



                but a sgt usually does carry the pike at the advance, so it would be the
                left hand that comes across assuming that is the situation.

                Mark D




                ,___



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • John
                Hi Tom, Speaking culturally for a moment from one within a Commonwealth military I can say that there are two salutes for both officers and men and perhaps
                Message 7 of 23 , Dec 30, 2012
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                  Hi Tom,

                  Speaking culturally for a moment from one within a Commonwealth military I can say that there are two salutes for both officers and men and perhaps this is where some of the confusion comes from. There is a (if you like) long salute which is the full present arms and sword salute where the sword is first raised hilt to the lips and then dropped to the full extent of the right arm. This is used when conducting Royal or General Salutes on the parade ground or to salute dignatories etc..

                  The short salute or report is when for the troops, the left arm (with the current weapons) is brought sharply across the body, forearm parallel to the deck, fingers extended etc.. The equivalent for officer's is to raise the sword hilt to the lips but then to return to the carry. In both cases this is used when reporting to a superior officer prior to an inspection or a similar 'short report'..

                  It's difficult to explain, but in the case of the full present arms it is conducted by the troops in order to salute, whilst officers simultaneously perform a sword salute (which is in effect the same thing as a present arms) but it's not described in those terms... You won't I believe see a drill manual for sword drill for example describing the sword salute as a "present arms", but it may say that an officer will conduct the sword salute at the same time as the men present arms, his movements conforming with theirs... Semantics I know but perhaps a subtle distinction from the days when social class was more of a factor in the military than it is today.. A bit like the old saying that the men sweat but officers perspire, or that officers 'make love' and the men/NCO's fornicate...!

                  Not sure if that helped or not, but it is very difficult describing cultural nuances to those outside the culture...

                  Cheers,

                  John


                  --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Colonel" <lehrerprofessoren@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I would like to ask if you are refering to an officer being saluted by a soldier presenting arms to him when you say, "...officers do not present arms." I know from manuals of the 18th century and following that officers are instructed in presenting arms when in line and in formation with the battalion or when marching with eyes left or right. Please clarify for me if officers are not to present arms at all according to some research as I would like to have this straight for future mention. Thank you.
                  >
                  > Tom
                  >
                  > --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "shayna121" <PrivateCannon@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Very interesting.
                  > >
                  > > Iain and I have been carrying on this converstaion offline, but here are some of the things we've discussed:
                  > >
                  > > 1) Officers do not 'present arms.' When their men do so, they salute.
                  > >
                  > > 2) To reiterate, no period drill manual yet found has a 'present arms' for Serjeants armed with a pike.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > 3) This drill manual says Serjeants are to remain at the shoulder during all other movements, but that would still allow them to salute in the manner described in previous converstaions (arm across the body to set the musket or pike firmly into the shoulder). They wouldn't be removing their pike from their shoulder.
                  > >
                  > > Do these things suggest that while the rank and file present arms, the Serjeants salute as they would when approaching an officer? The other alternative is that they do nothing, which doesn't quite feel right to me.
                  > >
                  > > Also, as this is a drill manual for the pike, can we assume that Serjeants armed with muskets continue to present arms?
                  > >
                  > > I'd love to hear others' thoughts.
                  > >
                  > > Merry Christmas and Happy Hogmanay,
                  > >
                  > > Chris McKay
                  > >
                  > > --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Iain Burns" <iain51hdbw@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > All,
                  > > that, "Serjeants remain at the shoulder during the performance of the other parts of the exercise...'
                  > >
                  > > > Mr. McKay's addition to the conversation re: saluting, taken from the 85th Light Infantry Standing orders book, would therefore only be employed when a Serjeant was rendering proper reverence to an Officer, and not something used when the rest of his group was called to Present. Indeed, the manuals I have seen have a "Salute" for Officers, but again nothing about a special move for Present; to my mind, at least, there is a subtle difference between being called to Present and rendering a Salute, even though one might Salute while others are given the order to Present.
                  > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Aye,
                  > > > Iain
                  > > > 1st Royal Scots, No. 3 (Centre) Coy
                  > >
                  >
                • John
                  This sounds like the drill movement our Sergeant s use in Aust for the full present arms. For the short report scenario we use the left hand across the body -
                  Message 8 of 23 , Dec 30, 2012
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                    This sounds like the drill movement our Sergeant's use in Aust for the full present arms. For the short report scenario we use the left hand across the body - for a start it would be too dangerous to lower the spontoon to a perpendicular position in front of a senior officer when your trying to report to him...!

                    Cheers,

                    John

                    --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, Kevin Windsor <kevin.windsor@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Iain, the best I can figure from the manual is to recover arms.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > "Throw the pike to the front in a perpendicular position opposite to the
                    > left eye, the right hand grasping it at the shoe, which touches the body
                    > slightly, and the left hand supporting the shaft by holding it opposite the
                    > left eye between the thumb and fore-finger; the left elbow is in this
                    > position bent, and risen as high as the left shoulder."
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > This is from "A Treatise on the British Drill and Exercise of the Company"
                    > 1816
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Kevin
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • peter monahan
                    And exactly which manual has the make love and fornicate drills in it? Peter Monahan John Potter said: Semantics I know but perhaps a subtle
                    Message 9 of 23 , Dec 31, 2012
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                      And exactly which manual has the 'make love' and fornicate drills in it?

                      Peter Monahan





                      John Potter said: <SNIP> "Semantics I know but perhaps a subtle distinction from the days when social class was more of a factor in the military than it is today.. A bit like the old saying that the men sweat but officers perspire, or that officers 'make love' and the men/NCO's fornicate...!<unSNIP>
                    • Mark Dickerson
                      My mistake then. During my years as a sergeant in the light company, I only every carried a musket, not one of those silly fish/pike things. And I always
                      Message 10 of 23 , Jan 2, 2013
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                        My mistake then. During my years as a sergeant in the light company, I only
                        every carried a musket, not one of those silly fish/pike things. And I
                        always carried it at the advance as befitting such an important person of
                        quality and dignity.



                        Mark







                        From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                        Of Kevin Windsor
                        Sent: Saturday, December 29, 2012 4:20 PM
                        To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: RE: 1812 Re: Pike Drill for Serjeants, Revisited...





                        There is nothing in the "Exercise of the Pike" that shows "Advance Arms" for
                        the pike.

                        Kevin

                        From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com <mailto:WarOf1812%40yahoogroups.com>
                        [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com <mailto:WarOf1812%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
                        Behalf
                        Of Mark Dickerson

                        but a sgt usually does carry the pike at the advance, so it would be the
                        left hand that comes across assuming that is the situation.

                        Mark D

                        ,___

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • John
                        You know what the Army is like.. Everything is regulated and done by the numbers ...! ;-) John
                        Message 11 of 23 , Jan 2, 2013
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                          You know what the Army is like.. Everything is regulated and done 'by the numbers'...! ;-)

                          John

                          --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, peter monahan <petemonahan@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > And exactly which manual has the 'make love' and fornicate drills in it?
                          >
                          > Peter Monahan
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > John Potter said: <SNIP> "Semantics I know but perhaps a subtle distinction from the days when social class was more of a factor in the military than it is today.. A bit like the old saying that the men sweat but officers perspire, or that officers 'make love' and the men/NCO's fornicate...!<unSNIP>
                          >
                        • Kevin Windsor
                          No I guess you are too fancy for things like that!! KW From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark Dickerson My
                          Message 12 of 23 , Jan 2, 2013
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                            No I guess you are too fancy for things like that!!



                            KW



                            From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                            Of Mark Dickerson



                            My mistake then. During my years as a sergeant in the light company, I only
                            every carried a musket, not one of those silly fish/pike things. And I
                            always carried it at the advance as befitting such an important person of
                            quality and dignity.

                            Mark




                            ___



                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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