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Re: 1812 Tecumseh

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  • Chris Pohlkamp
    There simply are no fully authenticated portraits of Tecumseh. The portrait of Tecumseh most likely to be an accurate representation of him (based on
    Message 1 of 18 , May 1, 2012
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      There simply are no fully authenticated portraits of Tecumseh. The portrait
      of Tecumseh most likely to be an accurate representation of him (based on
      circumstantial evidence) is a sketch drawn in 1808 by trader Pierre Le Dru,
      who met Tecumseh and drew it from memory. Some paintings, like Lossing
      famous color portrait (seen here: http://en.wikipedia
      org/wiki/File:Tecumseh02.jpg), are based on this sketch by Pierre Le Dru,
      who also did a reasonably accurate sketch of the Prophet, Tecumseh's brother


      Le Dru's sketch can be seen here: http://www.galafilm
      com/1812/e/catalogues/sket283.html

      Dale Adamson
      On-Gwe-Ho-Way



      -------Original Message-------

      From: annbwass@...
      Date: 01/05/2012 10:45:29 AM
      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: 1812 Tecumseh


      Does anyone know if there are any contemporary portraits of Tecumseh? I
      found one dated much after his death, and one with no date.

      Thanks!

      Ann Wass

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    • petemonahan
      Jim I don t have the source in front of me right now, but I believe the portrait used by Canada Post of Tecumseth is based on the sole contemporary
      Message 2 of 18 , May 1, 2012
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        Jim

        I don't have the source in front of me right now, but I believe the portrait used by Canada Post of Tecumseth is based on the sole contemporary illustration, which was done in black and white by a French fur trader, sometime around 1795-1800 if memeoty serves. It is the siource for the commonest illustration one sees of the chief, the coloured version of which was painted in the 1860s I think, and 'modified' versions of which abound, often with the addition of british military clothing, medals, a new head dress and so on.

        I'll try and post the correct one in the photo section.
      • annbwass@aol.com
        Thanks to all who provided information. I have found it very difficult to find contemporary images of any native Americans, especially in the U.S. (I ve seen
        Message 3 of 18 , May 2, 2012
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          Thanks to all who provided information. I have found it very difficult to find contemporary images of any native Americans, especially in the U.S. (I've seen some from Canada) before 1820.


          Ann Wass
        • Paul and Charlene
          Good Evening Folks - I am not a regular visitor to your group, but the request from Ann Wass was forwarded to me by Charlene Roberts. My name is Lisa Gilbert,
          Message 4 of 18 , May 3, 2012
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            Good Evening Folks - I am not a regular visitor to your group, but the request from Ann Wass was forwarded to me by Charlene Roberts. My name is Lisa Gilbert, and I am chair of Friends of the Tecumseh Monument. Some of you probably know that our group has been trying to get the site near where Tecumseh was killed at the Battle of the Thames (Moraviantown), known as the Tecumseh Monument site, redeveloped, in time for the bicentennial of his death on October 5, 2013. If you are interested in more information, visit our website at TecumsehMonument.ca. In answer to your question Ann, I want to corroborate what Jim Yaworsky said (also forwarded to me by Charlene), and just re-iterate that there is no fully authenticated contemporary illustration of Tecumseh, but, according to the research that I have done, the best one to use is the Benjamin Lossing engraving. He reportedly based his picture on a pencil sketch made about 1808 by a fur trader named Pierre Le Dru. Unfortunately, Lossing substituted a British officer's coat for Tecumseh's more probable deerskin shirt. The turban is probably accurate though, as it is known that Tecumseh favoured turbans. I also just want to add that the woman who was hired to draw the picture for the stamp was in contact with me earlier this year, and from my conversations with her, I think the picture will be as accurate as possible. I'm looking forward to seeing it. Thanks for your time.

            Sincerely,

            Lisa Gilbert,
            Friends of the Tecumseh Monument

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