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Re: Re: U.S. Navy

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  • Scott McDonald
    ... Here is a rundown on the comparative sizes of the American and British Navies during the War of 1812 and observations on the early success of the US Navy
    Message 1 of 40 , Mar 1, 2000
      >From: ninety3rd@...
      >Actually, I don't think the USA had any men-o-war. The frigates were as large
      >as the US got at that time I believe.

      Here is a rundown on the comparative sizes of the American and British
      Navies during the War of 1812 and observations on the early success of the
      US Navy quoted from "The Darkest Day - The Washington Baltimore Campaign"
      by Chas. G. Muller begining on page 9:

      "At sea , where prospects had looked very bad for the United States,
      results proved very good.
      The Navy floated three 44 gun frigates, four 36 gunfrigates, three 32 gun
      frigates, ten smaller vessels of war and 170 gun boats. The fleet assembled
      an aggregate of some 500 guns. With these 500 guns, America sailed out
      against 1042 British ships!
      As mistress of the seas Great Britian boasted 254ships-of-the-line with 74
      guns and upwards; augmented by 35 lesser-powered ships, 247 frigates, and
      506 smaller vessels of war.
      David did not have to pit his slingshot against Goliath's full strength,
      however. Great Britian had first to spread her floatilla against France
      over the eastern Atlantic Ocean and acrorr the Baltic, North, and
      Mediterranean Seas; after that she could concentrate on America in the
      Western Atlantic.
      So United States naval captians bearded the British lion on the high seas,
      picking their opportunities so well and concluding their work so
      sucessfully that within a year the lion screamed in London's press that
      England's maritime supremacy was being stripped from her 'by a peice of
      striped bunting flying at the mastheads of a few fir-built frigates, manned
      by handful of bastards and cowards.'
      Those words did not sit well, and Yankee privateers skippered and sailed by
      just such crews swarmed over the Atlantic to lend the Navy a hand.
      Estimates for the last six months of 1812 gave American saea forces a total
      of 250 merchantmen and more than 50 armed British vessels captured, with
      more than 3000 prisioners taken."

      Of course the situation changed when in 1813 Britian unleashed Adml.
      Cockburn who blockaded the Chesapeake Bay and bottled up two frigates, the
      Constellation (36 guns) and the Adams (24 guns), and as the situation in
      Europe progressed in Britians favor, the number of British ships in
      American waters increased dramatically.

      Cheers
      Scott McDonald
    • easeufe@aol.com
      In a message dated 3/1/00 10:10:07 PM Eastern Standard Time, raintree@evansville.net writes:
      Message 40 of 40 , Mar 1, 2000
        In a message dated 3/1/00 10:10:07 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        raintree@... writes:

        << have a source which says that the Marine contingent on a 1st rate ship
        (Admiral's flagship) consisted of 131 privates, 4 corporals, 4 sergants, 3
        Lieutenants, a Captian, and 2 Drummers. Does this sound right?
        >>
        Most Admirals flew their flags in 1st or sometimes on lesser stations, 2nd
        rates. As marines were assigned to ships based on the number of guns, the
        above figure does indeed sound right though the largest SOL was the 120 gun
        HMS Caledonia. Most certainly a 1st rate had a Captain of Marines and 3
        subalterns. An Admiral may well wish to have more than a normal contingent
        of Marines around also. Before the mutinies of the Nore and Spithead,
        marines made up approximately 1/6 (or 17%) of the entire ship's crew;
        afterwards the Admiralty raised it to 1/5 (20%). Using that as a base, a
        ship with a total crew of 750 would have 150 marines (officers, ncos and
        rankers).

        Ed
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