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Re: Re: U.S. Navy

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  • The Bosse Family
    Thanks for the answer on the gun leather, That is why you have to take period illistrations with a grain-o-salt. ... Dave Bosse ... From:
    Message 1 of 40 , Mar 1 5:58 AM
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      Thanks for the answer on the gun leather, That is why you have to take period illistrations with a grain-o-salt.
      >DOH, I forgot about carronades totally! That is why the Essex Chewed up everything she found in a "knife fight". Decaturs first command USS Enterprise only had carronades (20 I think) and spanked the grand Pasha (whatever he was called) without a single US casulty. It would fit his fighting style "The fewre the men, the greater the glory".
      >Beattys words of wisdom are probably the best I have ever read in about the RN, well except maybe Churchills comment "Rum, Buggery, and athe Lash".
      >Why not pick on the RN its fun and breaks the ice at partys.
      >Hey Mike how about a warm and fuzzy game of Lacross, I am not very good at chess.

      Dave Bosse
      -----Original Message-----
      From: mmathews@... <mmathews@...>
      To: WarOf1812@onelist.com <WarOf1812@onelist.com>
      Date: Tuesday, February 29, 2000 3:05 PM
      Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Re: U.S. Navy


      From: mmathews@...

      >From: "The Bosse Family" <monga589@...>
      >
      >Thats great Mike,
      >Now what about the feats of streanth with the loser commiting Sepku?

      Uhmmmmmmm, how 'bout a nice game of chess instead? ;-)

      Michael
      (momma didn't raise no fool)

      Michael Mathews -- Winona State University
      Voice: (507) 285-7585 Fax: (507) 280-5568
      ------------------------------
      "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the
      opportunity in every difficulty." - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)



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      The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • easeufe@aol.com
      In a message dated 3/1/00 10:10:07 PM Eastern Standard Time, raintree@evansville.net writes:
      Message 40 of 40 , Mar 1 10:06 PM
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        In a message dated 3/1/00 10:10:07 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        raintree@... writes:

        << have a source which says that the Marine contingent on a 1st rate ship
        (Admiral's flagship) consisted of 131 privates, 4 corporals, 4 sergants, 3
        Lieutenants, a Captian, and 2 Drummers. Does this sound right?
        >>
        Most Admirals flew their flags in 1st or sometimes on lesser stations, 2nd
        rates. As marines were assigned to ships based on the number of guns, the
        above figure does indeed sound right though the largest SOL was the 120 gun
        HMS Caledonia. Most certainly a 1st rate had a Captain of Marines and 3
        subalterns. An Admiral may well wish to have more than a normal contingent
        of Marines around also. Before the mutinies of the Nore and Spithead,
        marines made up approximately 1/6 (or 17%) of the entire ship's crew;
        afterwards the Admiralty raised it to 1/5 (20%). Using that as a base, a
        ship with a total crew of 750 would have 150 marines (officers, ncos and
        rankers).

        Ed
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