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Re: 1812 NCO's Small Sword Training

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  • Craig Williams
    A note, Nco s did not purchase their own swords. And, other than the suggested RM bayonet drill, there really wasn t one other than point and march. Regarding
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 22, 2012
      A note,

      Nco's did not purchase their own swords.
      And, other than the suggested RM bayonet drill, there really wasn't
      one other than point and march.
      Regarding sword training, Mr. Bateman is correct in that the pike was
      the weapon of choice for Sergeants.
      Sword training for infantry? I'm still looking for references too!

      Craig

      On 22-Feb-12, at 10:51 PM, Andrew Bateman wrote:

      > On 2/18/2012 9:52 AM, ucmilitiagreen wrote:
      > > Once a common soldier was made Sergeant and purchased his Small
      > Sword were there any regulations regarding his training with it?
      > I'd be interested to find this out as well, since I've recently become
      > interested in historical swordplay and I've started to wonder how it
      > applies to 1812. My *suspicion* is that in the infantry, enlisted men
      > did not get sword training and you were expected to do most of your
      > fighting with your pike, which would have been enough like using a
      > bayonet that you wouldn't need special training. But if you want to
      > find out how it was done, probably the best place to start is Henry
      > Angelo's 1799 manual for the sabre and highland broadsword. This
      > manual
      > was later adapted by the Royal Navy for its cutlass drills too, so it
      > would be applicable on land or at sea. There is a group in the States
      > called ARMA (the Association for Renaissance Martial Arts) that has
      > this
      > manual posted in their online library.
      >
      > Andrew Bateman, 41st Foot
      >
      >
      >



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