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Re: Impressment and US sovereignty and supposed Brit disrespect of same

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  • Jim
    Great point about language. I found an American reference (1820 s) that had Lieutenant pronounced Leftenant . So, if you are portraying a US Army, Marine or
    Message 1 of 40 , Feb 2, 2012
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      Great point about language.
      I found an American reference (1820's) that had Lieutenant pronounced 'Leftenant'.
      So, if you are portraying a US Army, Marine or Naval Lieutenant, you might be 'left' instead of 'lieu', or you could just ask for a promotion.

      --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "usmarine1814" <usmarine1814@...> wrote:
      [snip]

      > I am sure there are people oth there that know the whole language and accent "thing." How close would the two accents be in 1812-1815
      >
      > All the best
      > YHOS
      > Colin Murphy
    • Peter Catley
      When I asked my father about why he signed up in 1939 his answer was very simple, because you did a whole generation in the UK did because it was the right
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 4, 2012
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        When I asked my father about why he signed up in 1939 his answer was very simple, "because you did" a whole generation in the UK did because it was the right thing to do. Whether they still thought that in May 1945 (at least those who had survived) is perhaps a rather different question :)

        The Pensioner

        On 3 Feb 2012, at 22:28, Ron wrote:

        > When I asked my Grandad why he signed up for WW 1 and my Dad for WW II the answer was the same--for the adventure! Not KIng and country, not to oppose the godless Hun but simply for the adventure. Neiher wanted a job or signed up through economic necessity.
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: peter monahan <petemonahan@...>
        > To: warof1812 <warof1812@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Fri, Feb 3, 2012 1:41 pm
        > Subject: RE: 1812 Re: Punishments
        >
        > Moderator says: [?]
        >
        > --------------------------
        > The Message:
        >
        > Squire wrotwe: "Was a good option if you were starving."
        >
        > Spot on, Squire! Certainly, not everyone who joined the Allied forces in 1939-40-41 did it solely because of a deep seated hatered for National Socialism. Three squares a day and a new brown or blue suit must have sounded pretty good to many of the men who hadn't worked [or eaten properly] in the Depression years. I also noted a few years ago one young lad who'd lost his job at Marks & Spencer and joined the British Army and died in Iraq. His pastor at homne referred tio him as 'an economic conscript', which I thought a very telling turn of phrase. Certainly a large number, of the grunts at least, who serve in the Canadian Foprces come from the less affluent parts of this great land.
        >
        > Peter Monahan
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >



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