Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Deserter punishments

Expand Messages
  • James Yaworsky
    ... I guess the recaptured deserter could hope that the fleet in question was one of the smaller squadrons? ; ) I forgot about keel-hauling people too. If a
    Message 1 of 40 , Feb 1, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "MasterAtArms" <ucpm_gunner@...> wrote:
      > "James Yaworsky" wrote:
      > " As far as I know, deserters, once recaptured, were punished but not strung up etc., [snip]

      > Ummmm.... not so much, Jim. Quite often, the punishment for desertion, as imposed by court-martial, was either death by hanging (usually from the yardarm of the ship from which the offender had deserted), or a particularly brutal little ritual know as "flogging 'round the Fleet". [snip]
      > Cheers,
      > Dale

      I guess the recaptured deserter could hope that the fleet in question was one of the smaller squadrons? ;>) I forgot about keel-hauling people too. If a ship was fresh out of dry dock with a nice smooth copper bottom, chances of survival were higher than if done on a ship with a barnacle-encrusted hull...

      It would be interesting to see hard stats on these situations. Some people survived, but my aged memory of people getting hung or flogged round the fleet etc. has been jogged by Dale's message and deserting and then getting caught was obviously not a "good thing" to happen for the offender.

      This sort of reinforces the necessity of catching deserters if possible so as to maintain the deterrent effect of such draconian punishments on people thinking of deserting.

      It's also worth mentioning that stealing a loaf of bread in London could get you a free one-way ticket to Australia at this time... and theoretically, hung.

      It was a much more brutal world, for sure.

      Jim Yaworsky
    • Peter Catley
      When I asked my father about why he signed up in 1939 his answer was very simple, because you did a whole generation in the UK did because it was the right
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 4, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        When I asked my father about why he signed up in 1939 his answer was very simple, "because you did" a whole generation in the UK did because it was the right thing to do. Whether they still thought that in May 1945 (at least those who had survived) is perhaps a rather different question :)

        The Pensioner

        On 3 Feb 2012, at 22:28, Ron wrote:

        > When I asked my Grandad why he signed up for WW 1 and my Dad for WW II the answer was the same--for the adventure! Not KIng and country, not to oppose the godless Hun but simply for the adventure. Neiher wanted a job or signed up through economic necessity.
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: peter monahan <petemonahan@...>
        > To: warof1812 <warof1812@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Fri, Feb 3, 2012 1:41 pm
        > Subject: RE: 1812 Re: Punishments
        >
        > Moderator says: [?]
        >
        > --------------------------
        > The Message:
        >
        > Squire wrotwe: "Was a good option if you were starving."
        >
        > Spot on, Squire! Certainly, not everyone who joined the Allied forces in 1939-40-41 did it solely because of a deep seated hatered for National Socialism. Three squares a day and a new brown or blue suit must have sounded pretty good to many of the men who hadn't worked [or eaten properly] in the Depression years. I also noted a few years ago one young lad who'd lost his job at Marks & Spencer and joined the British Army and died in Iraq. His pastor at homne referred tio him as 'an economic conscript', which I thought a very telling turn of phrase. Certainly a large number, of the grunts at least, who serve in the Canadian Foprces come from the less affluent parts of this great land.
        >
        > Peter Monahan
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.