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Re: [Bulk] Re: 1812 U. S. Here to Stay?

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  • John Matthew IV
    ... Every war has many perspectives. A couple of years ago I was in Japan and visited a military museum/shrine. The history of the Second World War was very
    Message 1 of 40 , Jan 28, 2012
      Jim Gallen wrote:

      > Thanks for your comment. The most interesting thing I find in this list is
      > the different perspectives and importance of the war as seen from the >
      > American and Canadian sides. We were always taught that this was an
      > existential threat to the U.S. and now I realize that the Canadians
      > view it as a threat to their continued existence as a British entity. I
      > will probably teach a one night class on the war this fall and will
      > incorporate these concepts into it. I recently became chairman of a
      > Military History Club. At our meeting on Tuesday I asked how many of
      > the c. 30 attendees think much of the War of 1812. One hand went up. I
      > mentioned that this seems to be much bigger issue to the
      > Canadians. I will try to raise there awareness over the next three years.

      Every war has many perspectives. A couple of years ago I was in Japan and
      visited a military museum/shrine. The history of the Second World War was
      very different than from what I learned. For one thing, it wasn't even
      called that, it was "The Pacific War." Pearl Harbour was not a surprise
      attack.

      With the War of 1812, we have the advantage of being able to read, in the
      original language, accounts from the American, British and Canadian
      perspective. We don't have those advantages when studying most wars in
      history.

      Still, I am not sure how the War of 1812 could be thought of an "existential
      threat to the U.S." They declared war on us!

      But maybe that just proves I have something to learn.

      Good luck with your Club, Jim.

      John Matthew IV
    • Peter Catley
      When I asked my father about why he signed up in 1939 his answer was very simple, because you did a whole generation in the UK did because it was the right
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 4, 2012
        When I asked my father about why he signed up in 1939 his answer was very simple, "because you did" a whole generation in the UK did because it was the right thing to do. Whether they still thought that in May 1945 (at least those who had survived) is perhaps a rather different question :)

        The Pensioner

        On 3 Feb 2012, at 22:28, Ron wrote:

        > When I asked my Grandad why he signed up for WW 1 and my Dad for WW II the answer was the same--for the adventure! Not KIng and country, not to oppose the godless Hun but simply for the adventure. Neiher wanted a job or signed up through economic necessity.
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: peter monahan <petemonahan@...>
        > To: warof1812 <warof1812@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Fri, Feb 3, 2012 1:41 pm
        > Subject: RE: 1812 Re: Punishments
        >
        > Moderator says: [?]
        >
        > --------------------------
        > The Message:
        >
        > Squire wrotwe: "Was a good option if you were starving."
        >
        > Spot on, Squire! Certainly, not everyone who joined the Allied forces in 1939-40-41 did it solely because of a deep seated hatered for National Socialism. Three squares a day and a new brown or blue suit must have sounded pretty good to many of the men who hadn't worked [or eaten properly] in the Depression years. I also noted a few years ago one young lad who'd lost his job at Marks & Spencer and joined the British Army and died in Iraq. His pastor at homne referred tio him as 'an economic conscript', which I thought a very telling turn of phrase. Certainly a large number, of the grunts at least, who serve in the Canadian Foprces come from the less affluent parts of this great land.
        >
        > Peter Monahan
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >



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