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Re: January 8, 2012, at the site of the Battle of New Orleans

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  • ONeil
    In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, HQ93rd@... wrote: Just a point of nik-piking; there were no Kentucky Rifles at the battle. For one thing there was at the no
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 16, 2012
      In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, HQ93rd@... wrote:
      Just a point of nik-piking; there were no "Kentucky Rifles" at the battle. For one thing there was at the no time no such thing. Pennsylvania rifles, yes. Tennessee rifles, yes. British Baker rifles, yes. "Kentucky Rifle" is a generic and misleading term coined long after 1815 ...

      Thanks for your comments, B. It's not nit picking. It's history. This is why I write novels, instead of history. American longrifle, Pennsylvania long rifle, Virginia long rifle, Kentucky long rifle. So many rifles, so many historical sources with different information. I had to make a call. Tennesseans had long rifles, New Orleans riflemen had long rifles, the free-men-of-color had rifles, of course the British green-clad 95th Rifle Regiment had rifles (which is in the book).

      This is why I put a caveat at the beginning of my novel. " `… fairness is not the historical novelist's first duty,' the great historical writer Bernard Cornwell pens in his notes at the end of Sword Song (2008). He is correct, of course. The duty of an historical novelist is to entertain, to elicit emotion in the reader and if mistakes of fact are made (from errors in research, by omission or by design), well, it happens."

      Poetic license comes with a dual-edged sword. I should have asked the re-enactors – O'Neil De Noux
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