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Re: U.S. Navy

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  • The Bosse Family
    No one can sell the US Navy short during this era. They were able to do something that the French and Spanish were unable to do in 20 years of
    Message 1 of 40 , Feb 26, 2000
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      No one can sell the US Navy short during this era. They were able to do something that the French and Spanish were unable to do in 20 years of warfare........kick the stuffings out of the British in a stand up fight. Please don't bring up the Chesapeke and the capture of the Essex. Even Nelson said our frigates would give the british trouble when he saw one passing Gibralter after the Barbery Pirate War.

      Dave Bosse
      Americas Friend
      -----Original Message-----
      From: Five Rivers <lgsteph@...>
      To: WarOf1812@onelist.com <WarOf1812@onelist.com>
      Date: Friday, February 25, 2000 6:01 AM
      Subject: [WarOf1812] Re: 104th Foot Coat


      From: "Five Rivers" <lgsteph@...>

      Richard, Len, et al,

      > Are you going to the conference next weekend? I can
      > bring them down then for you to have a look see.

      Wouldn't mind if you meandered by the cooper/embroider with said photos.
      I've been interested in the tailoring (or lack of tailoring) techniques in
      military coats. I had been under the impression these were extremely
      well-sewn garments with excellent finishing, until a group of soldiers
      showed me their coatees and I was shocked at the raw edges and stitchery,
      which they said was very typical.

      Not having access to primary sources for those sorts of details, an
      opportunity to see your photos of the garments would add to my knowledge
      base enormously.

      Oh, and regards the image you tried to upload - you can reduce the size
      of it by reducing the size of it, as it were, and by changing the format in
      which you save it. I'm sure a lot of us would love to see the image online.
      But perhaps I state in the obvious in many areas. I can be awfully dense
      sometimes. :-)

      Lorina
      Five Rivers Chapmanry ~ purveyors of quality hand-crafted cooperage
      fine hand-sewn embroidered garments
      historical sewing patterns & embroidery supplies
      http://www.5rivers.org emaiL:info@...


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      The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • easeufe@aol.com
      In a message dated 3/1/00 10:10:07 PM Eastern Standard Time, raintree@evansville.net writes:
      Message 40 of 40 , Mar 1, 2000
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        In a message dated 3/1/00 10:10:07 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        raintree@... writes:

        << have a source which says that the Marine contingent on a 1st rate ship
        (Admiral's flagship) consisted of 131 privates, 4 corporals, 4 sergants, 3
        Lieutenants, a Captian, and 2 Drummers. Does this sound right?
        >>
        Most Admirals flew their flags in 1st or sometimes on lesser stations, 2nd
        rates. As marines were assigned to ships based on the number of guns, the
        above figure does indeed sound right though the largest SOL was the 120 gun
        HMS Caledonia. Most certainly a 1st rate had a Captain of Marines and 3
        subalterns. An Admiral may well wish to have more than a normal contingent
        of Marines around also. Before the mutinies of the Nore and Spithead,
        marines made up approximately 1/6 (or 17%) of the entire ship's crew;
        afterwards the Admiralty raised it to 1/5 (20%). Using that as a base, a
        ship with a total crew of 750 would have 150 marines (officers, ncos and
        rankers).

        Ed
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