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Re: 1812 USF Constitution

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  • Robert White
    Well, it depends on what you mean by the real deal . None of Constitution s guns are her original guns. All are replicas. But none are quakers . The 24
    Message 1 of 22 , Apr 4, 2011
      Well, it depends on what you mean by the "real deal". None of Constitution's
      guns are her original guns. All are replicas. But none are "quakers". The 24
      pounders average about 6 tons a piece and the 32 pound smashers (carronades)
      about 3 to 4 tons each. The only sacrifice to historical accuracy are the two
      forward 24 pounders on the gun deck one on the port and one on the starboard
      side which are actually modified to breech loaders which fire a shell. These
      two guns firing from alternating sides are what are used to fire the gun
      salutes. On each trip we generally fire a 21 gun salute opposite Fort
      Independence in the harbor saluting the United States and then closer to where
      we dock parallel to where the Statehouse is located inland and actually fairly
      close to where she was launched we fire a 19 gun salute to the Commonwealth of
      Massachusetts. Constitution is a rated 44 but normally carried a compliment of
      55 guns. No problems on weight and stress due to her design and contrary to
      another post due to her lack of "rot". Great book with all kinds of specs etc.
      written by a former commanding officer is "A Most Fortunate Ship".

      Bob White, 1812 Marine Guard, USF Constitution.



      ________________________________
      From: Terry <tlubka@...>
      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sat, April 2, 2011 12:34:25 AM
      Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution


      Bob,
      Could you answer a question about the USF Constitution? I've always wondered if
      all the guns on her are the real deal or due to weight and stress on the ship
      most are quakers?

      I know the Victory has 'artificial' guns on her due to the stress of weight.

      Regards,

      Terry




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • JJ
      ANN, We,the 1812 Marine Guard have the very extreme pleasure of participating each year in the celebration of the Ships Birthday every Oct.21st. The Marine
      Message 2 of 22 , Apr 4, 2011
        ANN, We,the 1812 Marine Guard have the very extreme pleasure of participating each year in the celebration of the Ships Birthday every Oct.21st. The Marine Guard as part of the ships crew also receives our RUM ration. (Grog) We are the last and ONLY ship in the US NAVY to attend to the custom.

        --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, annbwass@... wrote:
        >
        > I had the honor to be part of the Fort McHenry contingent to the
        > Charlestown Navy Yard in 2000. We had the extreme privilege of a private tour of
        > the ship, as well as being on the USS J F Kennedy for the tall ship sail-by
        > (or whatever that is technically called.) We also did living history
        > interpretation at the Navy Yard while we there. It was definitely a
        > once-in-a-lifetime experience, all in all. Don't know that I will ever get to ride the
        > flight deck elevator on a carrier again, or see alcohol served on a US
        > Navy ship!
        >
        > Ann Wass
        >
        >
        > In a message dated 3/30/2011 6:07:03 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
        > suthren@... writes:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > In 1992 I had the pleasure to sail into Boston harbour as crew in the
        > Canadian square-topsail schooner 'Pacific Swift', on a passage from
        > Baltimore to Halifax. We arrived at 'Constitution's' pier just as morning
        > Colors took place, and dipped our Canadian ensign to the grand old lady.
        > Her
        > crew could not have been finer hosts for tours, and it was a honor to go
        > below in such a storied ship of such importance to the USN. When we sailed
        > for Halifax we dipped ensign again and even fired a salute to her---with a
        > 10 gauge blank---but felt a much deeper sense of respect for her and her
        > huge, handsome ensign than our little gun displayed. A visit to her is
        > unforgettable, and should be a goal of every 1812 re-enactor, of whatever
        > national loyalty.
        >
        > Vic Suthren
        >
        > Canada
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Tim Pickles
        Interesting that the US Navy refers to the drink as grog . As you are probably aware this name derives from Vice Admiral Edward Vernon RN who introduced a
        Message 3 of 22 , Apr 5, 2011
          Interesting that the US Navy refers to the drink as 'grog'. As you are probably aware this name derives from Vice Admiral Edward Vernon RN who introduced a measure of water into the rum ration in 1740. He commonly wore a grogram cloth coat and so was nicknamed old grogram or old grog. Nice that the most 'British' of US units also keeps up a British tradition.


          Aye


          Tim


          -----Original Message-----
          From: JJ <cplusmc1812@...>
          To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Mon, Apr 4, 2011 3:44 pm
          Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution







          ANN, We,the 1812 Marine Guard have the very extreme pleasure of participating each year in the celebration of the Ships Birthday every Oct.21st. The Marine Guard as part of the ships crew also receives our RUM ration. (Grog) We are the last and ONLY ship in the US NAVY to attend to the custom.

          --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, annbwass@... wrote:
          >
          > I had the honor to be part of the Fort McHenry contingent to the
          > Charlestown Navy Yard in 2000. We had the extreme privilege of a private tour of
          > the ship, as well as being on the USS J F Kennedy for the tall ship sail-by
          > (or whatever that is technically called.) We also did living history
          > interpretation at the Navy Yard while we there. It was definitely a
          > once-in-a-lifetime experience, all in all. Don't know that I will ever get to ride the
          > flight deck elevator on a carrier again, or see alcohol served on a US
          > Navy ship!
          >
          > Ann Wass
          >
          >
          > In a message dated 3/30/2011 6:07:03 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
          > suthren@... writes:
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > In 1992 I had the pleasure to sail into Boston harbour as crew in the
          > Canadian square-topsail schooner 'Pacific Swift', on a passage from
          > Baltimore to Halifax. We arrived at 'Constitution's' pier just as morning
          > Colors took place, and dipped our Canadian ensign to the grand old lady.
          > Her
          > crew could not have been finer hosts for tours, and it was a honor to go
          > below in such a storied ship of such importance to the USN. When we sailed
          > for Halifax we dipped ensign again and even fired a salute to her---with a
          > 10 gauge blank---but felt a much deeper sense of respect for her and her
          > huge, handsome ensign than our little gun displayed. A visit to her is
          > unforgettable, and should be a goal of every 1812 re-enactor, of whatever
          > national loyalty.
          >
          > Vic Suthren
          >
          > Canada
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >










          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • annbwass@aol.com
          As a textiles person, I appreciate that origin of the term. Am I remembering correctly that lime juice was also an essential ingredient of grog? Ann Wass ...
          Message 4 of 22 , Apr 5, 2011
            As a textiles person, I appreciate that origin of the term. Am I remembering correctly that lime juice was also an essential ingredient of grog?

            Ann Wass




            -----Original Message-----
            From: Tim Pickles <BritcomHMP@...>
            To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 8:20 am
            Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution




            Interesting that the US Navy refers to the drink as 'grog'. As you are probably aware this name derives from Vice Admiral Edward Vernon RN who introduced a measure of water into the rum ration in 1740. He commonly wore a grogram cloth coat and so was nicknamed old grogram or old grog. Nice that the most 'British' of US units also keeps up a British tradition.

            Aye

            Tim

            -----Original Message-----
            From: JJ <cplusmc1812@...>
            To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Mon, Apr 4, 2011 3:44 pm
            Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

            ANN, We,the 1812 Marine Guard have the very extreme pleasure of participating each year in the celebration of the Ships Birthday every Oct.21st. The Marine Guard as part of the ships crew also receives our RUM ration. (Grog) We are the last and ONLY ship in the US NAVY to attend to the custom.

            --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, annbwass@... wrote:
            >
            > I had the honor to be part of the Fort McHenry contingent to the
            > Charlestown Navy Yard in 2000. We had the extreme privilege of a private tour of
            > the ship, as well as being on the USS J F Kennedy for the tall ship sail-by
            > (or whatever that is technically called.) We also did living history
            > interpretation at the Navy Yard while we there. It was definitely a
            > once-in-a-lifetime experience, all in all. Don't know that I will ever get to ride the
            > flight deck elevator on a carrier again, or see alcohol served on a US
            > Navy ship!
            >
            > Ann Wass
            >
            >
            > In a message dated 3/30/2011 6:07:03 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
            > suthren@... writes:
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > In 1992 I had the pleasure to sail into Boston harbour as crew in the
            > Canadian square-topsail schooner 'Pacific Swift', on a passage from
            > Baltimore to Halifax. We arrived at 'Constitution's' pier just as morning
            > Colors took place, and dipped our Canadian ensign to the grand old lady.
            > Her
            > crew could not have been finer hosts for tours, and it was a honor to go
            > below in such a storied ship of such importance to the USN. When we sailed
            > for Halifax we dipped ensign again and even fired a salute to her---with a
            > 10 gauge blank---but felt a much deeper sense of respect for her and her
            > huge, handsome ensign than our little gun displayed. A visit to her is
            > unforgettable, and should be a goal of every 1812 re-enactor, of whatever
            > national loyalty.
            >
            > Vic Suthren
            >
            > Canada
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Tim Pickles
            Actually no Ann,s and lime lime juce were used as a preventitive for scurvy but not in grog. Tim ... From: annbwass To: WarOf1812
            Message 5 of 22 , Apr 5, 2011
              Actually no Ann,s and lime lime juce were used as a preventitive for scurvy but not in grog.


              Tim





              -----Original Message-----
              From: annbwass <annbwass@...>
              To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 3:27 am
              Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution






              As a textiles person, I appreciate that origin of the term. Am I remembering correctly that lime juice was also an essential ingredient of grog?

              Ann Wass

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Tim Pickles <BritcomHMP@...>
              To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 8:20 am
              Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

              Interesting that the US Navy refers to the drink as 'grog'. As you are probably aware this name derives from Vice Admiral Edward Vernon RN who introduced a measure of water into the rum ration in 1740. He commonly wore a grogram cloth coat and so was nicknamed old grogram or old grog. Nice that the most 'British' of US units also keeps up a British tradition.

              Aye

              Tim

              -----Original Message-----
              From: JJ <cplusmc1812@...>
              To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Mon, Apr 4, 2011 3:44 pm
              Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

              ANN, We,the 1812 Marine Guard have the very extreme pleasure of participating each year in the celebration of the Ships Birthday every Oct.21st. The Marine Guard as part of the ships crew also receives our RUM ration. (Grog) We are the last and ONLY ship in the US NAVY to attend to the custom.

              --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, annbwass@... wrote:
              >
              > I had the honor to be part of the Fort McHenry contingent to the
              > Charlestown Navy Yard in 2000. We had the extreme privilege of a private tour of
              > the ship, as well as being on the USS J F Kennedy for the tall ship sail-by
              > (or whatever that is technically called.) We also did living history
              > interpretation at the Navy Yard while we there. It was definitely a
              > once-in-a-lifetime experience, all in all. Don't know that I will ever get to ride the
              > flight deck elevator on a carrier again, or see alcohol served on a US
              > Navy ship!
              >
              > Ann Wass
              >
              >
              > In a message dated 3/30/2011 6:07:03 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
              > suthren@... writes:
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > In 1992 I had the pleasure to sail into Boston harbour as crew in the
              > Canadian square-topsail schooner 'Pacific Swift', on a passage from
              > Baltimore to Halifax. We arrived at 'Constitution's' pier just as morning
              > Colors took place, and dipped our Canadian ensign to the grand old lady.
              > Her
              > crew could not have been finer hosts for tours, and it was a honor to go
              > below in such a storied ship of such importance to the USN. When we sailed
              > for Halifax we dipped ensign again and even fired a salute to her---with a
              > 10 gauge blank---but felt a much deeper sense of respect for her and her
              > huge, handsome ensign than our little gun displayed. A visit to her is
              > unforgettable, and should be a goal of every 1812 re-enactor, of whatever
              > national loyalty.
              >
              > Vic Suthren
              >
              > Canada
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Tim Pickles
              that should have read limes and lime juce ... From: Tim Pickles To: WarOf1812 Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 6:08 am
              Message 6 of 22 , Apr 5, 2011
                that should have read


                limes and lime juce





                -----Original Message-----
                From: Tim Pickles <BritcomHMP@...>
                To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 6:08 am
                Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution





                Actually no Ann,s and lime lime juce were used as a preventitive for scurvy but not in grog.

                Tim

                -----Original Message-----
                From: annbwass <annbwass@...>
                To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 3:27 am
                Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                As a textiles person, I appreciate that origin of the term. Am I remembering correctly that lime juice was also an essential ingredient of grog?

                Ann Wass

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Tim Pickles <BritcomHMP@...>
                To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 8:20 am
                Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                Interesting that the US Navy refers to the drink as 'grog'. As you are probably aware this name derives from Vice Admiral Edward Vernon RN who introduced a measure of water into the rum ration in 1740. He commonly wore a grogram cloth coat and so was nicknamed old grogram or old grog. Nice that the most 'British' of US units also keeps up a British tradition.

                Aye

                Tim

                -----Original Message-----
                From: JJ <cplusmc1812@...>
                To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Mon, Apr 4, 2011 3:44 pm
                Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                ANN, We,the 1812 Marine Guard have the very extreme pleasure of participating each year in the celebration of the Ships Birthday every Oct.21st. The Marine Guard as part of the ships crew also receives our RUM ration. (Grog) We are the last and ONLY ship in the US NAVY to attend to the custom.

                --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, annbwass@... wrote:
                >
                > I had the honor to be part of the Fort McHenry contingent to the
                > Charlestown Navy Yard in 2000. We had the extreme privilege of a private tour of
                > the ship, as well as being on the USS J F Kennedy for the tall ship sail-by
                > (or whatever that is technically called.) We also did living history
                > interpretation at the Navy Yard while we there. It was definitely a
                > once-in-a-lifetime experience, all in all. Don't know that I will ever get to ride the
                > flight deck elevator on a carrier again, or see alcohol served on a US
                > Navy ship!
                >
                > Ann Wass
                >
                >
                > In a message dated 3/30/2011 6:07:03 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                > suthren@... writes:
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > In 1992 I had the pleasure to sail into Boston harbour as crew in the
                > Canadian square-topsail schooner 'Pacific Swift', on a passage from
                > Baltimore to Halifax. We arrived at 'Constitution's' pier just as morning
                > Colors took place, and dipped our Canadian ensign to the grand old lady.
                > Her
                > crew could not have been finer hosts for tours, and it was a honor to go
                > below in such a storied ship of such importance to the USN. When we sailed
                > for Halifax we dipped ensign again and even fired a salute to her---with a
                > 10 gauge blank---but felt a much deeper sense of respect for her and her
                > huge, handsome ensign than our little gun displayed. A visit to her is
                > unforgettable, and should be a goal of every 1812 re-enactor, of whatever
                > national loyalty.
                >
                > Vic Suthren
                >
                > Canada
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • JOHN GREIG
                Bad enough desecrating good rum with water.  But to add lime juice well !!!!!!! Bottoms Up. Squire ________________________________ From: Tim Pickles
                Message 7 of 22 , Apr 5, 2011
                  Bad enough desecrating good rum with water.  But to add lime juice well !!!!!!!

                  Bottoms Up.

                  Squire




                  ________________________________
                  From: Tim Pickles <BritcomHMP@...>
                  To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, 5 April, 2011 16:07:28
                  Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                   
                  Actually no Ann,s and lime lime juce were used as a preventitive for scurvy but
                  not in grog.

                  Tim

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: annbwass <annbwass@...>
                  To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 3:27 am
                  Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                  As a textiles person, I appreciate that origin of the term. Am I remembering
                  correctly that lime juice was also an essential ingredient of grog?

                  Ann Wass

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Tim Pickles <BritcomHMP@...>
                  To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 8:20 am
                  Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                  Interesting that the US Navy refers to the drink as 'grog'. As you are probably
                  aware this name derives from Vice Admiral Edward Vernon RN who introduced a
                  measure of water into the rum ration in 1740. He commonly wore a grogram cloth
                  coat and so was nicknamed old grogram or old grog. Nice that the most 'British'
                  of US units also keeps up a British tradition.

                  Aye

                  Tim

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: JJ <cplusmc1812@...>
                  To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Mon, Apr 4, 2011 3:44 pm
                  Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                  ANN, We,the 1812 Marine Guard have the very extreme pleasure of participating
                  each year in the celebration of the Ships Birthday every Oct.21st. The Marine
                  Guard as part of the ships crew also receives our RUM ration. (Grog) We are the
                  last and ONLY ship in the US NAVY to attend to the custom.


                  --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, annbwass@... wrote:
                  >
                  > I had the honor to be part of the Fort McHenry contingent to the
                  > Charlestown Navy Yard in 2000. We had the extreme privilege of a private tour
                  >of
                  >
                  > the ship, as well as being on the USS J F Kennedy for the tall ship sail-by
                  > (or whatever that is technically called.) We also did living history
                  > interpretation at the Navy Yard while we there. It was definitely a
                  > once-in-a-lifetime experience, all in all. Don't know that I will ever get to
                  >ride the
                  >
                  > flight deck elevator on a carrier again, or see alcohol served on a US
                  > Navy ship!
                  >
                  > Ann Wass
                  >
                  >
                  > In a message dated 3/30/2011 6:07:03 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                  > suthren@... writes:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > In 1992 I had the pleasure to sail into Boston harbour as crew in the
                  > Canadian square-topsail schooner 'Pacific Swift', on a passage from
                  > Baltimore to Halifax. We arrived at 'Constitution's' pier just as morning
                  > Colors took place, and dipped our Canadian ensign to the grand old lady.
                  > Her
                  > crew could not have been finer hosts for tours, and it was a honor to go
                  > below in such a storied ship of such importance to the USN. When we sailed
                  > for Halifax we dipped ensign again and even fired a salute to her---with a
                  > 10 gauge blank---but felt a much deeper sense of respect for her and her
                  > huge, handsome ensign than our little gun displayed. A visit to her is
                  > unforgettable, and should be a goal of every 1812 re-enactor, of whatever
                  > national loyalty.
                  >
                  > Vic Suthren
                  >
                  > Canada
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • annbwass@aol.com
                  A restaurant I used to frequent served a drink called Navy grog and it had lime juice. I know lime juice was a scurvy preventative, but I thought perhaps by
                  Message 8 of 22 , Apr 5, 2011
                    A restaurant I used to frequent served a drink called "Navy grog" and it had lime juice. I know lime juice was a scurvy preventative, but I thought perhaps by adding it to the grog, you took care of several problems at once.

                    Ann Wass


                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Tim Pickles <BritcomHMP@...>
                    To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 11:07 am
                    Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution




                    Actually no Ann,s and lime lime juce were used as a preventitive for scurvy but not in grog.

                    Tim

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: annbwass <annbwass@...>
                    To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 3:27 am
                    Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                    As a textiles person, I appreciate that origin of the term. Am I remembering correctly that lime juice was also an essential ingredient of grog?

                    Ann Wass

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Tim Pickles <BritcomHMP@...>
                    To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 8:20 am
                    Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                    Interesting that the US Navy refers to the drink as 'grog'. As you are probably aware this name derives from Vice Admiral Edward Vernon RN who introduced a measure of water into the rum ration in 1740. He commonly wore a grogram cloth coat and so was nicknamed old grogram or old grog. Nice that the most 'British' of US units also keeps up a British tradition.

                    Aye

                    Tim

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: JJ <cplusmc1812@...>
                    To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Mon, Apr 4, 2011 3:44 pm
                    Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                    ANN, We,the 1812 Marine Guard have the very extreme pleasure of participating each year in the celebration of the Ships Birthday every Oct.21st. The Marine Guard as part of the ships crew also receives our RUM ration. (Grog) We are the last and ONLY ship in the US NAVY to attend to the custom.

                    --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, annbwass@... wrote:
                    >
                    > I had the honor to be part of the Fort McHenry contingent to the
                    > Charlestown Navy Yard in 2000. We had the extreme privilege of a private tour of
                    > the ship, as well as being on the USS J F Kennedy for the tall ship sail-by
                    > (or whatever that is technically called.) We also did living history
                    > interpretation at the Navy Yard while we there. It was definitely a
                    > once-in-a-lifetime experience, all in all. Don't know that I will ever get to ride the
                    > flight deck elevator on a carrier again, or see alcohol served on a US
                    > Navy ship!
                    >
                    > Ann Wass
                    >
                    >
                    > In a message dated 3/30/2011 6:07:03 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                    > suthren@... writes:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > In 1992 I had the pleasure to sail into Boston harbour as crew in the
                    > Canadian square-topsail schooner 'Pacific Swift', on a passage from
                    > Baltimore to Halifax. We arrived at 'Constitution's' pier just as morning
                    > Colors took place, and dipped our Canadian ensign to the grand old lady.
                    > Her
                    > crew could not have been finer hosts for tours, and it was a honor to go
                    > below in such a storied ship of such importance to the USN. When we sailed
                    > for Halifax we dipped ensign again and even fired a salute to her---with a
                    > 10 gauge blank---but felt a much deeper sense of respect for her and her
                    > huge, handsome ensign than our little gun displayed. A visit to her is
                    > unforgettable, and should be a goal of every 1812 re-enactor, of whatever
                    > national loyalty.
                    >
                    > Vic Suthren
                    >
                    > Canada
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    =


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Robert White
                    Actually, I think the recipe used on Constitution does include lime juice. I do know that the grog sold by Pusser s itself also contains lime juice as I
                    Message 9 of 22 , Apr 5, 2011
                      Actually, I think the recipe used on Constitution does include lime juice. I do
                      know that the "grog" sold by Pusser's itself also contains lime juice as I
                      bought some when visiting in Tortola where it is all produced. In fact met the
                      owner there. Bob White, 1812 Marine Guard, USF Constitution.



                      ________________________________
                      From: Tim Pickles <BritcomHMP@...>
                      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tue, April 5, 2011 11:12:44 AM
                      Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution


                      that should have read

                      limes and lime juce

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Tim Pickles <BritcomHMP@...>
                      To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 6:08 am
                      Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                      Actually no Ann,s and lime lime juce were used as a preventitive for scurvy but
                      not in grog.

                      Tim

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: annbwass <annbwass@...>
                      To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 3:27 am
                      Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                      As a textiles person, I appreciate that origin of the term. Am I remembering
                      correctly that lime juice was also an essential ingredient of grog?

                      Ann Wass

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Tim Pickles <BritcomHMP@...>
                      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tue, Apr 5, 2011 8:20 am
                      Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                      Interesting that the US Navy refers to the drink as 'grog'. As you are probably
                      aware this name derives from Vice Admiral Edward Vernon RN who introduced a
                      measure of water into the rum ration in 1740. He commonly wore a grogram cloth
                      coat and so was nicknamed old grogram or old grog. Nice that the most 'British'
                      of US units also keeps up a British tradition.

                      Aye

                      Tim

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: JJ <cplusmc1812@...>
                      To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Mon, Apr 4, 2011 3:44 pm
                      Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                      ANN, We,the 1812 Marine Guard have the very extreme pleasure of participating
                      each year in the celebration of the Ships Birthday every Oct.21st. The Marine
                      Guard as part of the ships crew also receives our RUM ration. (Grog) We are the
                      last and ONLY ship in the US NAVY to attend to the custom.


                      --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, annbwass@... wrote:
                      >
                      > I had the honor to be part of the Fort McHenry contingent to the
                      > Charlestown Navy Yard in 2000. We had the extreme privilege of a private tour
                      >of
                      >
                      > the ship, as well as being on the USS J F Kennedy for the tall ship sail-by
                      > (or whatever that is technically called.) We also did living history
                      > interpretation at the Navy Yard while we there. It was definitely a
                      > once-in-a-lifetime experience, all in all. Don't know that I will ever get to
                      >ride the
                      >
                      > flight deck elevator on a carrier again, or see alcohol served on a US
                      > Navy ship!
                      >
                      > Ann Wass
                      >
                      >
                      > In a message dated 3/30/2011 6:07:03 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                      > suthren@... writes:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > In 1992 I had the pleasure to sail into Boston harbour as crew in the
                      > Canadian square-topsail schooner 'Pacific Swift', on a passage from
                      > Baltimore to Halifax. We arrived at 'Constitution's' pier just as morning
                      > Colors took place, and dipped our Canadian ensign to the grand old lady.
                      > Her
                      > crew could not have been finer hosts for tours, and it was a honor to go
                      > below in such a storied ship of such importance to the USN. When we sailed
                      > for Halifax we dipped ensign again and even fired a salute to her---with a
                      > 10 gauge blank---but felt a much deeper sense of respect for her and her
                      > huge, handsome ensign than our little gun displayed. A visit to her is
                      > unforgettable, and should be a goal of every 1812 re-enactor, of whatever
                      > national loyalty.
                      >
                      > Vic Suthren
                      >
                      > Canada
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >

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                    • Lee
                      Dear list- In 1796, encouraged by Sir Gilbert Blane, a prominent naval surgeon, the Admiralty required in it s Regulations and Instructions Relating to his
                      Message 10 of 22 , Apr 5, 2011
                        Dear list-

                        In 1796, encouraged by Sir Gilbert Blane, a prominent naval surgeon, the Admiralty required in it's Regulations and Instructions Relating to his Majesty's Service at Sea that, "Lemon Juice at half an ounce per day with sugar at same amount to be allowed when on, or be proceeding to, foreign stations and to be mixed with grog or wine--BUT not while beer is being issued." This quote can be found on p. 40 of Nelson's Blood byJames Pack.

                        Although any citrus would do, lemon juice was the most potent. However limes were less expensive and became the citrus of choice as time went by. I am sure that most of you know that this gave Brit sailors the nickname "Limey" that eventuated in the same word meaning any generic Brit.

                        Take Care, Lee Davis,Surgeon, Royal Navy
                      • charliequ2@gmail.com
                        Well said sir. Should we refrain on the quality & efficacy of those...? Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry ... From: Lee Sender:
                        Message 11 of 22 , Apr 5, 2011
                          Well said sir. Should we refrain on the quality & efficacy of those...?
                          Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: "Lee" <wartman@...>
                          Sender: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Tue, 05 Apr 2011 20:58:37
                          To: <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                          Reply-To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: 1812 USF Constitution

                          Dear list-

                          In 1796, encouraged by Sir Gilbert Blane, a prominent naval surgeon, the Admiralty required in it's Regulations and Instructions Relating to his Majesty's Service at Sea that, "Lemon Juice at half an ounce per day with sugar at same amount to be allowed when on, or be proceeding to, foreign stations and to be mixed with grog or wine--BUT not while beer is being issued." This quote can be found on p. 40 of Nelson's Blood byJames Pack.

                          Although any citrus would do, lemon juice was the most potent. However limes were less expensive and became the citrus of choice as time went by. I am sure that most of you know that this gave Brit sailors the nickname "Limey" that eventuated in the same word meaning any generic Brit.

                          Take Care, Lee Davis,Surgeon, Royal Navy




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