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Re: 1812 RE: cross-infection

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  • charliequ2@gmail.com
    You should look up the writing of Larrey, a surgeon of the period... Lots of good material. I don t have those links on the Bberry.. Sent from my Verizon
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 13, 2011
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      You should look up the writing of Larrey, a surgeon of the period... Lots of good material. I don't have those links on the Bberry..
      Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Sarah More <recce40@...>
      Sender: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2011 08:10:27
      To: WarOf1812<WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
      Reply-To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: 1812 RE: cross-infection

      Does anyone know of other steps to avoid cross-infection (particularly in an era when hygeine and sterilization of instruments was practically unheard of)?
      > Mike
      > http://mikerendell.com

      The time period is not 1812, but the following are what I have come across in my research relating to colonial wartime medicine.
       
      Medical Services in the British Army, 1742-1783, Paul E. Kopperman, page 441
      “Monro also suggested that the nurses be ordered to keep their wards clean, that every morning they sprinkle vinegar and fumigate with wet gunpowder, frankincense, or some other aromatic, and that they open the windows in their wards regularly, to assure adequate ventilation.” http://jhmas.oxfordjournals.org/content/XXXIV/4/428.full.pdf
       
      “The journal of Charlotte Brown, matron of the general hospital of the English forces in America, 1754-1756,” in Colonial captivities, marches and journeys, ed. Isabel M. Calder (New York, 1934). She was head matron under Braddock and was listed on his payroll.
       
      Colonial Williamsburg also sells a book titled, Colonial Spices & Herbs, Patricia B. Mitchell (Mitchells Publications, 2004) talks about a number of healing herbs such as:
       
      Chamomile- for fever, rash, toothache, and hemorrhoids: a sedative and air purifier.
      Marjoram- for colic, spasms, indigestion, toothache, colds, and accidental poisoning
      Nutmeg- for rheumatism, and cholera
      Rosemary- for fever and plague: an air purifier for the sick.
       
      The Canadian War Museum sells a book titled, Cher Journal: Mon Pays à Feu et à Sang, Geneviè ve Aubuchon, au temps de la bataille des Plaines d’Abraham, Qué bec, Nouvelle-France, 1759, Maxine Trottier, Scholastic Editions. Aubuchon was a young nurse with the Sisters at the Abbey in Quebec City during the French & Indian War. She mentions quite a few of the medicinal herbs used during the war.
       
      Cheers,
      Sarah



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    • petemonahan
      Sara Keep in mind that the conventional wisdom in the period was that illness was due, in part at least, to bad air . Hence the burning of various
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 13, 2011
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        Sara

        Keep in mind that the conventional wisdom in the period was that illness was due, in part at least, to 'bad air'. Hence the burning of various strongly-scented substances to 'purify' the air. Pasteur's work on 'germs' didn't come until the 1840s and the Hungarian who made a clear connection between germs and post-partum fevers was working in the '40s too.

        So, in fact, there weren't many efforts to cross-infection and the measures were not very effective simply because the actual mechanism of infection was largely a closed book to the medical profession of the time!

        Thank God for modern pharmaceuticals!
      • Tim Pickles
        In connection with Baron Larrey one should also look up the memoirs of Fanny Burney, a most remarkable lady, for her first hand description of the mastectomy
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 13, 2011
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          In connection with Baron Larrey one should also look up the memoirs of Fanny Burney, a most remarkable lady, for her first hand description of the mastectomy Larrey performed on her to cure her breast cancer. A real eye opener for anyone who thinks Georgian ladies fainted away at the thought of anything unpleasant!

          Aye

          Tim






          -----Original Message-----
          From: charliequ2 <charliequ2@...>
          To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sun, Feb 13, 2011 10:37 am
          Subject: Re: 1812 RE: cross-infection




          You should look up the writing of Larrey, a surgeon of the period... Lots of good material. I don't have those links on the Bberry..
          Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry





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        • charliequ2@gmail.com
          Indeed true sir. A chilling account to be sure. Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry ... From: Tim Pickles Sender:
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 13, 2011
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            Indeed true sir. A chilling account to be sure.
            Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Tim Pickles <BritcomHMP@...>
            Sender: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2011 19:43:39
            To: <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
            Reply-To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: 1812 RE: cross-infection


            In connection with Baron Larrey one should also look up the memoirs of Fanny Burney, a most remarkable lady, for her first hand description of the mastectomy Larrey performed on her to cure her breast cancer. A real eye opener for anyone who thinks Georgian ladies fainted away at the thought of anything unpleasant!

            Aye

            Tim






            -----Original Message-----
            From: charliequ2 <charliequ2@...>
            To: WarOf1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sun, Feb 13, 2011 10:37 am
            Subject: Re: 1812 RE: cross-infection




            You should look up the writing of Larrey, a surgeon of the period... Lots of good material. I don't have those links on the Bberry..
            Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry





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