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Waterloo Porridge

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  • Peter Catley
    Soo et al. Does this help? I always learn a lot of history from Roy s books, and here are a couple of examples. In The Four-loom Weaver, a song I have been
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 2, 2010
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      Soo et al.

      Does this help?

      I always learn a lot of history from Roy's books, and here are a couple of examples. In The Four-loom Weaver, a song I have been singing for nearly 50 years, there is a reference to 'waterloo porridge', which I've often wondered about, but not investigated. Clearly a derogatory term to imply rubbish. But in Chapter 8 (Singing a Pleading Song), we get the answer. Soldiers and sailors returning from the Napoleonic Wars were, as always, promised everything once victory was achieved: 'Then we shall have a loaf for sixpence once again. And then the poor of England may cease for to complain; And every trading country will flourish here once more'. Sound familiar, 20th century-wise? 'Waterloo' as an adjective was applied to many things in the most derogatory way in the period following the victory, when times were harder than ever. At least two songs under the title The Tradesman's Complaint spell this out."

      http://www.mustrad.org.uk/reviews/palmerbk.htm

      It suggests that it was very poor porridge, perhaps gruel as produced by the workhouses? which was a small amount of oatmeal of dubious quality, water and some salt. It seems to fit the context of the song.

      Cheers

      *(*
      back to the cell in Chelsea were the greul is a better quality sometimes.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ray Hobbs
      List: There is a brief article by, Anthony W. Shipps, in the following Oxford journal on Waterloo Porridge: WATERLOO PORRIDGE Notes and Queries (1984) 31(1):
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 2, 2010
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        List:
        There is a brief article by, Anthony W. Shipps, in the following Oxford
        journal on Waterloo Porridge:

        WATERLOO PORRIDGE Notes and Queries (1984) 31(1): 86-f-86

        Unfortunately, the journal is not accessible online from Canada, only
        in the UK through a system called "Athens".

        Peter C - over to you.
        Ray
      • Peter Catley
        Ray, I obey: The entry reads: WATERLOO PORRIDGE (ccxxviii. 240-1). -Dictionary, Waterloo-porridge is oatmeal porridge made with water only . A second possible
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 2, 2010
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          Ray,

          I obey:

          The entry reads:

          WATERLOO PORRIDGE (ccxxviii. 240-1). -Dictionary, Waterloo-porridge is 'oatmeal porridge made with water only'.
          A second possible definition is 'fig. a good beating'.

          ANTHONY W. SHIPPS . Indiana University Librarie

          So my observation regarding the workhouse gruel was quite close:-)

          Incidentally the access had to be through Standford University:-) Athens is not available to the general public in the UK ,you have to be a member of a subscribing organisation.

          Cheers

          *(*

          sOn 2 Dec 2010, at 13:12, Ray Hobbs wrote:

          > List:
          > There is a brief article by, Anthony W. Shipps, in the following Oxford
          > journal on Waterloo Porridge:
          >
          > WATERLOO PORRIDGE Notes and Queries (1984) 31(1): 86-f-86
          >
          > Unfortunately, the journal is not accessible online from Canada, only
          > in the UK through a system called "Athens".
          >
          > Peter C - over to you.
          > Ray
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • petemonahan
          Elizabeth Bowling of the 1812Civilian list contributed this to the discussion: This U.K. regional history site has a posting defining Waterloo porridge as a
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 2, 2010
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            Elizabeth Bowling of the 1812Civilian list contributed this to the discussion:

            This U.K. regional history site has a posting defining Waterloo porridge
            as 'a watery gruel of oats that was almost totally lacking in what we
            would regard as nutrition."

            http://www.ribchesterhistory.org/past_events_2010.htm



            My thanks to all involved!

            Peter
          • Soo
            LOL! You know, we could use all these odd queries to put together a 19thC version of Trivia. ;) Sue Too
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 3, 2010
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              LOL! You know, we could use all these odd queries to put together a 19thC version of Trivia. ;)

              Sue Too

              --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "petemonahan" <petemonahan@...> wrote:
              >
              > Elizabeth Bowling of the 1812Civilian list contributed this to the discussion:
              >
              > This U.K. regional history site has a posting defining Waterloo porridge
              > as 'a watery gruel of oats that was almost totally lacking in what we
              > would regard as nutrition."
              >
              > http://www.ribchesterhistory.org/past_events_2010.htm
              >
              >
              >
              > My thanks to all involved!
              >
              > Peter
              >
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