Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: 1812 Gorget

Expand Messages
  • Mark Dickerson
    In my previous email, the information about the Royal Scots is not from the museum, that is my own information. The paragraph following my name, is copied
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 7, 2009
      In my previous email, the information about the Royal Scots is not from the
      museum, that is my own information. The paragraph following my name, is
      copied from the NMA's website and the initial sentence should have been
      placed there.



      Please excuse my mistake and any confusion I may have caused.



      Mark Dickerson







      From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      Of Mark Dickerson
      Sent: December 7, 2009 1:05 PM
      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: 1812 Gorget







      Here is some information about gorgets taken from the National Museum of
      Australia's website.

      The Royal Scots had their own style of gorget. It was the basic
      standardized engraved gorget, with the Royal Scots badges attached on the
      right and left sides.

      I have found that it is nearly impossible to find the engraved style of
      gorget on the web. From the Waterloo gorgets that I have seen at auction
      sites, all were engraved.

      Mark Dickerson

      Throughout the eighteenth century the size continued to be reduced and the
      metal standardised to either gold or silver in accordance with the colour of
      the regimental lace of the officer. By the end of the eighteenth century it
      was determined that the patterns and colours of gorgets and ribbons should
      be standardised. The infantry but not the foot guards were to have one
      pattern of gorget, 'gilt with gold with the King's Driver and Crown over it,
      engraved in the middle'. Gorgets were 'to be worn with a ribbon and tuft or
      rosette at each end, of the colour of the facings of the Regiment or Corps,
      excepting those which are faced with black who are to wear them with a red
      ribbon ... the gorget to be fastened to the upper button and the lower part
      of it not to come below the sixth button'. [4] Regiments with badges or
      other honours also engraved these on the gorget. [5] By the nineteenth
      century the average size of gorgets was 76.2mm across [6] and they were
      fastened with rosettes and ribbons through their horns to the collar buttons
      or to the top buttons of the lapels. Gorgets were not usually worn by
      cavalry or officers of the rifle corps and light infantry as they were an
      irritation to people who needed to move rapidly.

      1. WE May, WY Carman and J Tanner, Badges and Insignia of the British
      Armed Services: the Royal Navy, the Army, the Flying Services, St Martin's
      Press, New York, 1974, p. 126.

      2. Walton quoted by May et al, p. 128.

      3. May et al, p. 128.

      4. May et al, p. 128.

      5. May et al, p. 128.

      6. May et al, p. 129.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.