Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: 1812 re; PTSD

Expand Messages
  • Victor Suthren
    During the First World War the British Army executed by firing squad many soldiers who were convicted of desertion but amongst whom, in retrospect, may have
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 2, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      During the First World War the British Army executed by firing squad many soldiers who were convicted of 'desertion' but amongst whom, in retrospect, may have been sufferers from "shell shock". Alone among British Empire troops, the Australians refused to execute such men---wittingly or unwittingly providing a more humane reaction to an inhuman situation. War is a foul and despicable business in any light, and to my mind "shell shock" would be a normal modern reaction to any lengthy exposure to its fratricidal insanity. That it may have been less so in 1812-14 may have been, as said earlier, because life was already a nasty, brutish and short business to begin with.

      Vic Suthren


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Anna Snipes
      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 10:53 PM
      Subject: Re: 1812 re; PTSD



      I myself cannot speak as any kind of military historian, but all of the references to shell shock that I have read in regards to WWI speak of it as casually as they would an amputated leg, or a gas attack, i.e., a physical condition, not a lack of moral fibre.

      But, once again, that is beyond the scope of this forum. I feel a thesis coming on!

      --- On Wed, 12/2/09, w.woods@... <w.woods@...> wrote:

      From: w.woods@... <w.woods@...>
      Subject: 1812 re; PTSD
      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, December 2, 2009, 3:10 AM



      As a footnote I thought that
      LMF (lack of moral fibre an expression that I find cruel in every application except to many contemporary politicians) was first used to describe shell shock victims of the First World War. I am quite possibly incorrect.
      Wm Woods

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • ronaldjdale@netscape.net
      I think that our ancestors were hard people but still there is a limit to what the human mind can handle. There are numerous cases of deserting to the enemy,
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 2, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        I think that our ancestors were hard people but still there is a limit to what the human mind can handle. There are numerous cases of deserting to the enemy, hanging back in the advance, floggings for insubordination and breakdowns in discipline that may have had a lot to do with battle fatigue. While most seemed to drink many were drunkards which could be related to PTSD. A team of psychiatrists could study the retreat to Corunna for a lifetime.

        Ron



        -----Original Message-----
        From: Victor Suthren <suthren@...>
        To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, Dec 2, 2009 7:39 am
        Subject: Re: 1812 re; PTSD




        During the First World War the British Army executed by firing squad many soldiers who were convicted of 'desertion' but amongst whom, in retrospect, may have been sufferers from "shell shock". Alone among British Empire troops, the Australians refused to execute such men---wittingly or unwittingly providing a more humane reaction to an inhuman situation. War is a foul and despicable business in any light, and to my mind "shell shock" would be a normal modern reaction to any lengthy exposure to its fratricidal insanity. That it may have been less so in 1812-14 may have been, as said earlier, because life was already a nasty, brutish and short business to begin with.

        Vic Suthren

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Anna Snipes
        To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 10:53 PM
        Subject: Re: 1812 re; PTSD

        I myself cannot speak as any kind of military historian, but all of the references to shell shock that I have read in regards to WWI speak of it as casually as they would an amputated leg, or a gas attack, i.e., a physical condition, not a lack of moral fibre.

        But, once again, that is beyond the scope of this forum. I feel a thesis coming on!

        --- On Wed, 12/2/09, w.woods@... <w.woods@...> wrote:

        From: w.woods@... <w.woods@...>
        Subject: 1812 re; PTSD
        To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, December 2, 2009, 3:10 AM

        As a footnote I thought that
        LMF (lack of moral fibre an expression that I find cruel in every application except to many contemporary politicians) was first used to describe shell shock victims of the First World War. I am quite possibly incorrect.
        Wm Woods

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.