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Re: Dover and the War of 1812

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  • tom4141fournier
    Hi Rick McArthur s Raid was a rather remarkable feat considering the distance covered and the pace with which they traveled. My general sense is that after
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 23, 2009
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      Hi Rick

      McArthur's Raid was a rather remarkable feat considering the distance covered and the pace with which they traveled.

      My general sense is that after turning away from defenses at Brant's Ford (but mostly due to the rain swollen river) they went south and met up with militia forces at Malcolm's Mills (near present day Oakland) and easily dispersed them. But with word of growing numbers of troops being sent to oppose them, they carried on back towards Detroit.

      It is another key piece of Norfolk County's War of 1812 history.

      You can find a nice article in the history section of our webpage titled "Last Casualty: Sergeant Charles Collins" written by our moderator Mr. Yaworsky.

      www.fortyfirst.org

      Sergeant Collins was on detached duty with the local militia and represents the 41st's last battlefield casualty during the War of 1812 at the Battle of Malcolm's Mills.

      Tom

      --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "rickpeterson1" <petersons@...> wrote:
      >
      > Tom, Bob, et all,
      > wasn't Dover also the victim of yet another foraging party during MacArthur's Raid in late fall of 1814? Evidently, he burned the depots and mills at (modern day) Burford, Waterford, Simcoe and all along Hwy 3 to Amhertsburg? Surely there was a foraging party sent off to nearby Dover. Anyone have more to add?
      >
      > Rick Peterson
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Cheryl" <deadlywoman52@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Bob is having trouble with his computer, so his comment on this topic is posted below.
      > >
      > > Since at least 1989 Dover's connection with the War of 1812 has been commemorated. The Americans burned the village in May 1814. This is not a fantasy. It is a fact.
      > >
      > > The re-enactment has evolved from a land battle to a lake battle because, as much as you want to be historically accurate, you have to cater to the public. No public, no event.
      > >
      > > What takes place during the Dover re-enactment is not a precise re-creation of a specific battle, although the replicated uniforms, weaponry and tactics are based on fact. The Dover re-enactment is also SYMBOLIC of what went on in this area during the War of 1812, including the battle at Nanticoke in November 1813, and it's primary purpose is to raise awareness of our history, specifically the War of 1812.
      > >
      > > It may not be 100 percent factual, but it is not, by any stretch of the imagination, fantasy.
      > >
      > > Bob Blakeley
      > >
      >
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