Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re; Fantasy events

Expand Messages
  • jbwhittaker
    Mr. Brunelle and Mr. Hobbs made the point about fantasy events, thanks. Wasaga Beach and Port Dover do have their place in history of course. Other so called
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 20, 2009
      Mr. Brunelle and Mr. Hobbs made the point about "fantasy" events, thanks. Wasaga Beach and Port Dover do have their place in history of course. Other so called fantasy events can serve to bring attention to and an interest in the War of 1812 in the few years leading up to the bi-centennial. A great example was Calvin Arnt's initiative to bring Rick Mercer to a fantasy event at Fanshawe Pioneer Village.
      Perhaps bi-centennial events can be activley promoted over the next couple of seasons at all 1812 events. This may help to ensure that audiences do come out.
      Thank you.
      Regards,
      Bruce Whittaker
    • Ray Hobbs
      Thanks for the comments Bruce. I would like to draw attention to the fact that the war was not just a series of skirmishes and battles. There was a local
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 20, 2009
        Thanks for the comments Bruce.
        I would like to draw attention to the fact that the war was not just a series of skirmishes and battles. There was a local population in Upper and Lower Canada, mistrusted by authorities, despised by some redcoats, yet who were very much involved in the events of the war.
        I have recently spent some time dredging through the war loss claims in the National Archive in Ottawa. Some are amusing ("One ox, died in His Majesty's Service" - either exhausted from hauling army wagons, or eaten); some blatantly fraudulent (an inhabitant of Coot's Paradise (Dundas) who had joined the US Army, but was "a friend of Durand", a local bigwig); some opportunistic (a certain vicar who was five years old when the war ended, but a friend of John Strachan in the 1840s, and claimed almost twice as much as his two parishes did combined); but the vast majority are sincere claims for fair compensation from the Board of Claims on behalf of the government. They highlight the enormous losses that many inhabitants suffered at the hands of the British, the Americans and the Natives. They do not deal with the settling of scores between neighbours, which is a story in itself. They shed light on the rather murky underbelly of the war. They deserve investigation, and the only book to deal with them in a responsible way is Sheppard's, "Plunder, Profit and Paroles" - although I disagree with some of his interpretations. Note the "Acknowledgements" where he thanks me for "mulling over and mauling" his original PhD thesis.
        Observations from eye-witnesses, not always sympathetic to the locals, are also enlightening. According to one who ridiculed the Militia behaviour at Chippewa, the locals throughout the Niagara region were "badly used" by the soldiers of both sides.
        These are incidents of war, and the hobby is dedicated not only to the military impressions, but also to the period as a whole.
        Now, holding events at militarily less important sites may not be attractive to some, but it does provide the public with opportunities to listen to how "their" towns and villages were treated during the war - providing, of course, that the hosts are well-informed. Our research, Living History Conferences, our websites can go some way in making this possible.
        And, speaking of living History Conferences - huzzah for the organisers of the Hamilton and London conferences.
        End of my musings for now.
        Yrs etc.
        Ray H


        To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
        From: ortheris@...
        Date: Fri, 20 Nov 2009 15:00:54 +0000
        Subject: 1812 Re; Fantasy events




























        Mr. Brunelle and Mr. Hobbs made the point about "fantasy" events, thanks. Wasaga Beach and Port Dover do have their place in history of course. Other so called fantasy events can serve to bring attention to and an interest in the War of 1812 in the few years leading up to the bi-centennial. A great example was Calvin Arnt's initiative to bring Rick Mercer to a fantasy event at Fanshawe Pioneer Village.

        Perhaps bi-centennial events can be activley promoted over the next couple of seasons at all 1812 events. This may help to ensure that audiences do come out.

        Thank you.

        Regards,

        Bruce Whittaker



















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.