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Re: Rifles in New Orleans

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  • John Weiss
    Thanks also to Roger Fuller. ... The book marked a milestone in the history of the WIR, though it has a number of innaccuracies, as all such accounts are bound
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 3, 1998
      Thanks also to Roger Fuller.


      He wrote also:
      > PS Have you seen the book "Slaves in Redcoats" about the West India
      > Regiments? (The author's name escapes me- I read it a while back.) A
      > definite must for anyone who wants to understand more about this conflict.

      The book marked a milestone in the history of the WIR, though it has a
      number of innaccuracies, as all such accounts are bound to be. Only 22
      Black Americans were recruited to the 2nd WIR during the War of 1812,
      half in the Chesapeake and half on Cumberland Island. My focus is on the
      Corps of Colonial Marines - they have been somewhat ignored, and I am
      working on the first definitive account. They served in Bermuda after the
      War and were then settled in Trinidad, forming a community that still
      maintains its identity. A Land Registry clerk in Trinidad once told me he
      had seen a musket used as a plot boundary marker, which he presumed dated
      from the War of 1812, but being a legal marker he had not disturbed it,
      and when he spoke to me he could not remember where it was! Are there any
      Trinidadian members who want to help re-enact the attacks on Washington
      or Baltimore, which is where the Corps saw most service, or the action at
      Pungoteake, where they had their first fatality?

      John Weiss <john.weiss@...>
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      Researching the four thousand Black Americans
      who took their freedom in the War of 1812
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