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Odd question regarding tertiary sources

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  • John Ogden
    All, At the risk of losing all credibility in the eyes of this esteemed list, I would like to know if there is anything for this period comparable to the
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 2, 2009
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      All,
      At the risk of losing all credibility in the eyes of this esteemed
      list, I would like to know if there is anything for this period comparable
      to the Sketchbook '76 (volumes 1 & 2) or Sketchbook '56 (volumes 1 - 6)
      series. I ask as I have a couple of friends doing other eras who have
      expressed some interest in the imminent Bicentennial but who are more
      visually-oriented than textually (dyslexia is a terrible thing when it comes
      to doing research). Suggestions? Anyone? Bueller?

      --
      John J. Ogden


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • BritcomHMP@aol.com
      Nothing quite like that exists for our period, the problem is that though the uniforms were fairly standard there are so many little quirks and differences
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 3, 2009
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        Nothing quite like that exists for our period, the problem is that though the uniforms were fairly standard there are so many little quirks and differences between (British) regiments that people who wish to re-create a unit research that particular unit rather than the general uniform. That said in 1990 or 95 Neil Morrison produced a book with an extremely limited circulation on the Highlanders at Waterloo heavily based on Sketchbook 76.

        Over the years I have considered puting together such a work myself but though on the face of it that would be quite straight forward? the task grows on thinking seriously about it. Take headger, for 1776 infantry there is the cocked hat (tricorn is a Victorian word) the same for everyone but with different trimming, simple. For 1812 there is the 1800 pattern shako, the 1812 pattern, the Light Infantry pattern, the cocked hat and the chapeau bras. All of these can be trimmed differently depending on regiment and company. When you start trying to compile this sort of thing it becomes obvious why, in dress regulations from 816 on, the method is to roughly discribe the senior regiment of each arm of service and then say that everything that can be different is "of regimental pattern"

        Cheers,

        Tim







        -----Original Message-----
        From: John Ogden <johnjogden@...>
        To: warof1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sun, Aug 2, 2009 7:26 pm
        Subject: 1812 Odd question regarding tertiary sources

























        All,

        At the risk of losing all credibility in the eyes of this esteemed

        list, I would like to know if there is anything for this period comparable

        to the Sketchbook '76 (volumes 1 & 2) or Sketchbook '56 (volumes 1 - 6)

        series. I ask as I have a couple of friends doing other eras who have

        expressed some interest in the imminent Bicentennial but who are more

        visually-oriented than textually (dyslexia is a terrible thing when it comes

        to doing research). Suggestions? Anyone? Bueller?



        --

        John J. Ogden



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bradley Jones
        A great visual reference to British uniforms of the period can be found in the recently publish book British Napoleonic Uniforms. I highly recommend the
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 3, 2009
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          A great visual reference to British uniforms of the period can be found in the recently publish book "British Napoleonic Uniforms." I highly recommend the book, as it has color drawings for almost every regiment in the British Army.

          The book can be purchased from Amazon (http://tinyurl.com/lhpa5v).

          Regards,

          Bradley Jones
        • Larry Lozon
          John There is a Sketchbook 1812 (USA & CROWN) in the works but it has not been published yet. yrs., L2 ... ... I would like to know if there is anything for
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 3, 2009
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            John

            There is a Sketchbook 1812 (USA & CROWN) in the works
            but it has not been published yet.

            yrs.,
            L2

            --- John Ogden wrote:
            "... I would like to know if there is anything for this period comparable to the Sketchbook '76 (volumes 1 & 2) or Sketchbook '56 (volumes 1 - 6) series. ..."
          • John Ogden
            Cool. Please let me know when publication is closer. ... -- John J. Ogden [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 3, 2009
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              Cool. Please let me know when publication is closer.

              On Mon, Aug 3, 2009 at 2:35 PM, Larry Lozon <larrylozon@...> wrote:

              >
              >
              >
              >
              > John
              >
              > There is a Sketchbook 1812 (USA & CROWN) in the works
              > but it has not been published yet.
              >
              > yrs.,
              > L2
              >
              > --- John Ogden wrote:
              > "... I would like to know if there is anything for this period comparable
              > to the Sketchbook '76 (volumes 1 & 2) or Sketchbook '56 (volumes 1 - 6)
              > series. ..."
              >
              >
              >



              --
              John J. Ogden


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Harry Pilotto
              Tim, Neil Morrison s book had a VERY limited run, I have copy #7. It is incorrect in a great many areas, but at the time, 1985, it was that or Osprey books.
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 3, 2009
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                Tim,
                Neil Morrison's book had a VERY limited run, I have copy #7. It is incorrect in a great many areas, but at the time, 1985, it was that or Osprey books.
                Harry
                --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, BritcomHMP@... wrote:
                >
                >
                > Nothing quite like that exists for our period, the problem is that though the uniforms were fairly standard there are so many little quirks and differences between (British) regiments that people who wish to re-create a unit research that particular unit rather than the general uniform. That said in 1990 or 95 Neil Morrison produced a book with an extremely limited circulation on the Highlanders at Waterloo heavily based on Sketchbook 76.
                >
                > Over the years I have considered puting together such a work myself but though on the face of it that would be quite straight forward? the task grows on thinking seriously about it. Take headger, for 1776 infantry there is the cocked hat (tricorn is a Victorian word) the same for everyone but with different trimming, simple. For 1812 there is the 1800 pattern shako, the 1812 pattern, the Light Infantry pattern, the cocked hat and the chapeau bras. All of these can be trimmed differently depending on regiment and company. When you start trying to compile this sort of thing it becomes obvious why, in dress regulations from 816 on, the method is to roughly discribe the senior regiment of each arm of service and then say that everything that can be different is "of regimental pattern"
                >
                > Cheers,
                >
                > Tim
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: John Ogden <johnjogden@...>
                > To: warof1812 <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Sun, Aug 2, 2009 7:26 pm
                > Subject: 1812 Odd question regarding tertiary sources
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                > All,
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                > At the risk of losing all credibility in the eyes of this esteemed
                >
                > list, I would like to know if there is anything for this period comparable
                >
                > to the Sketchbook '76 (volumes 1 & 2) or Sketchbook '56 (volumes 1 - 6)
                >
                > series. I ask as I have a couple of friends doing other eras who have
                >
                > expressed some interest in the imminent Bicentennial but who are more
                >
                > visually-oriented than textually (dyslexia is a terrible thing when it comes
                >
                > to doing research). Suggestions? Anyone? Bueller?
                >
                >
                >
                > --
                >
                > John J. Ogden
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              • Mark Dickerson
                Your friends can make their job of putting a uniform together, much easier if they can decide what side they want to portray, and then which regiment. I would
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 4, 2009
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                  Your friends can make their job of putting a uniform together, much easier
                  if they can decide what side they want to portray, and then which regiment.
                  I would suggest putting a uniform together of a regiment that is already
                  being portrayed by a current re-enactment group. There are many advantages
                  to this:



                  -the research of that regiment's individual quirks has already been done.
                  (duplication of hard work is a PITA)

                  -the buttons, lace and badges are readily available. It takes a long time
                  to get completely new buttons designed, a mold made and buttons cast.

                  -you don't have to join the existing group. You can form your own group but
                  portray a different company of that regiment. (Example, the Royal Scots
                  currently have 3 separate groups all portraying the same regiment)

                  -it looks nicer on a battlefield to have larger numbers of the same regiment
                  rather than 10 different groups of all different regiments.

                  -often that other group keeps an inventory of items that could be purchased,
                  already pre-made



                  Mark Dickerson







                  From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                  Of John Ogden
                  Sent: August 2, 2009 8:27 PM
                  To: warof1812
                  Subject: 1812 Odd question regarding tertiary sources





                  All,
                  At the risk of losing all credibility in the eyes of this esteemed
                  list, I would like to know if there is anything for this period comparable
                  to the Sketchbook '76 (volumes 1 & 2) or Sketchbook '56 (volumes 1 - 6)
                  series. I ask as I have a couple of friends doing other eras who have
                  expressed some interest in the imminent Bicentennial but who are more
                  visually-oriented than textually (dyslexia is a terrible thing when it comes
                  to doing research). Suggestions? Anyone? Bueller?

                  --
                  John J. Ogden

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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