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Re: 1812 Re: Crossing the border - what about looking like you have a bomb?

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  • HAROLD DENNISON
    Chris is quite correct. While we are exempted from having to carry permits for them, they are none the less firearms and must be declared. Hal Dennison
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 2, 2009
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      Chris is quite correct. While we are exempted from having to carry permits for them, they are none the less firearms and must be declared.


      Hal Dennison
      1-800-385-9630
      www.JustDreamLife.com
       
      I teach people like "you" how to make six figure incomes working from home.

      --- On Mon, 3/2/09, Chris McKay <PrivateCannon@...> wrote:

      From: Chris McKay <PrivateCannon@...>
      Subject: 1812 Re: Crossing the border - what about looking like you have a bomb?
      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      Received: Monday, March 2, 2009, 9:42 AM






      This has come up before, and people keep saying this, but that's
      incorrect. Antique Firearms (and replicas) do not need to be
      registered currently in Canada - true. However, that does NOT mean
      they aren't firearms. They are firearms and you still need to declare
      them.

      Chris McKay

      --- In WarOf1812@yahoogrou ps.com, "Roger" <Rogerheiple@ ...> wrote:
      >
      > When asked if I have any "firearms", I say 'no, however I do have an
      > antique reproduction with blank ammunition'.
      >
      > This has been discussed before but I believe a smoothbore, flintlock
      > is not considered a `firearm' or is at least exempt under Canada's
      > laws. So, technically the answer to the question about firearms
      > is 'no' but I always declare the flintlocks.
















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kevin Windsor
      Thank you Chris! KW
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 2, 2009
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        Thank you Chris!

        KW


        >From: "Chris McKay" <PrivateCannon@...>
        >
        >This has come up before, and people keep saying this, but that's
        >incorrect. Antique Firearms (and replicas) do not need to be
        >registered currently in Canada - true. However, that does NOT mean
        >they aren't firearms. They are firearms and you still need to declare
        >them.
        >
        >Chris McKay
      • whittakermp
        There is much pertinent information available from the Canadian Firearms Program at www.cfc-cafc.gc.ca. This is a snippet from
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 3, 2009
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          There is much pertinent information available from the Canadian
          Firearms Program at www.cfc-cafc.gc.ca.

          This is a snippet from
          www.cfc-cafc.gc.ca/factsheets/powder_e.asp

          Muzzleloaders Made Before 1898

          All black powder muzzleloaders made before 1898 are classified as
          antique firearms. Antique firearms are exempt from the licence and
          registration requirements set out in the Firearms Act.

          Muzzleloaders Made After 1898

          All matchlock, flintlock and wheel lock long guns are classified as
          antiques no matter when they were made. Like older firearms of these
          types, they are exempt from the licence and registration
          requirements set out in the Firearms Act.


          Michael Whittaker
        • John Matthew IV
          Michael Whittaker quoted the Canadian Firearms Program: Muzzleloaders Made Before 1898 Muzzleloaders Made After 1898 Did something happen in 1898
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 3, 2009
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            Michael Whittaker quoted the Canadian Firearms Program:

            Muzzleloaders Made Before 1898
            <snip>

            Muzzleloaders Made After 1898
            <snip>

            Did something happen in 1898 or was that just a year the legislators
            aribitrarily picked?



            John Matthew IV
          • ANDREW BATEMAN
            AFAIK, 1898 is a year they arbitrarily picked, but it also happens to coincide with US law.  In the States, any firearm made before 1898 falls under
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 3, 2009
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              AFAIK, 1898 is a year they arbitrarily picked, but it also happens to coincide with US law.  In the States, any firearm made before 1898 falls under "Curios and Relics" and you do not need federal paperwork to buy or sell it.  In Canada, some pre-1898 firearms are controlled under the firearms act (most handguns and cartridge guns) while others are not (muzzleloading long guns, single shot breechloaders for cartridges over 8.5mm, and even some handguns in obsolete calibers).
               
              Andrew Bateman, 41st Foot

              --- On Tue, 3/3/09, John Matthew IV <john.matthew@...> wrote:

              From: John Matthew IV <john.matthew@...>
              Subject: Re: 1812 Re: Crossing the border - Some useful information
              To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
              Received: Tuesday, March 3, 2009, 2:42 PM

              Michael Whittaker quoted the Canadian Firearms Program:

              Muzzleloaders Made Before 1898
              <snip>

              Muzzleloaders Made After 1898
              <snip>

              Did something happen in 1898 or was that just a year the legislators
              aribitrarily picked?



              John Matthew IV







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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • RICHARD HARDMAN
              Legislators arbitary pick.  However, the significance is that caplocks (Muskets, Fowlers, Rifles and Pistols) and flintlock pistols made before 1898 are
              Message 6 of 12 , Mar 3, 2009
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                Legislators arbitary pick.  However, the significance is that caplocks (Muskets, Fowlers, Rifles and Pistols) and flintlock pistols made before 1898 are antiques but those made after have to be registered. 

                It is interesting to note that my 1851 Navy Colt by Colt Manufacturing pre-1898 is an antique but my 1851 Navy Colt made by Uberti is registered.  Their relative condition is about the same but the real Colt shoots better.  It is also worth a lot more money than the repro.  I am looking for an original British Flintlock Pistol in reasonable condition if anyone cares to sell one.
                Richard Hardman




                ________________________________
                From: John Matthew IV <john.matthew@...>
                To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2009 9:42:05 AM
                Subject: Re: 1812 Re: Crossing the border - Some useful information


                Michael Whittaker quoted the Canadian Firearms Program:

                Muzzleloaders Made Before 1898
                <snip>

                Muzzleloaders Made After 1898
                <snip>

                Did something happen in 1898 or was that just a year the legislators
                aribitrarily picked?

                John Matthew IV




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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