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Re: 1812 Crossing the border

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  • Victor Eiser
    I wish the US border guards were as easy to deal with. VIVE L EMPEREUR ! Victor Eiser dit La Cuillère 3me Régiment d infanterie de ligne, 2me Bn 1er
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 1, 2009
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      I wish the US border guards were as easy to deal with.

      VIVE L'EMPEREUR !


      Victor Eiser dit La Cuillère
      3me Régiment d'infanterie de ligne, 2me Bn
      1er Régiment des Grenadiers à pied de la Garde Impériale, 1er Bn




      ________________________________
      From: Kevin Windsor <kevin.windsor@...>
      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2009 8:34:52 PM
      Subject: RE: 1812 Crossing the border


      There is no problem bringing it across the border.

      Flintlock muskets were exempted under Canada's firearm legislation and black
      powder is okay.

      You still have to declare it (as with any weapon) but you do not need a
      hunting permit, gun license, blood transfusion, baseball card or anything.

      The Cdn Border guard will say, "welcome to Canada; where are you going?"

      You say, "to Crysler's farm for a War of 1812 re-enactment! "

      "Do you have any weapons?"

      "Yes a flintlock musket and 1 pound of black powder"

      "Are you bringing in any meat, citrus fruit, or firewood?"

      "No"

      "thank you enjoy your stay"

      Pretty easy, I do it all the time; it is no big deal. . .

      Kevin

      89th

      _____

      From: WarOf1812@yahoogrou ps.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogrou ps.com] On Behalf
      Of Thomas Moore

      I have been reading all the messages on passports and I have recently
      acquired mine so I am set there. What is the ruling about bringing
      weapons across the border and, or, black powder cartridges?

      Tom Moore

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      __________________________________________________________________
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Roger
      When asked if I have any firearms , I say no, however I do have an antique reproduction with blank ammunition . This has been discussed before but I believe
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 2, 2009
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        When asked if I have any "firearms", I say 'no, however I do have an
        antique reproduction with blank ammunition'.

        This has been discussed before but I believe a smoothbore, flintlock
        is not considered a `firearm' or is at least exempt under Canada's
        laws. So, technically the answer to the question about firearms
        is 'no' but I always declare the flintlocks.

        On a separate but related note... There was once a bomb scare at
        the Bluewater Bridge a few days before I was returning from Canada
        to the USA. While waiting on the Canadian side, I noticed a few
        officers with dogs checking out the cars in line. My uncleaned
        muskets were on the floor of my trailer. So was my unused
        cartridges & extra power - in a metal box of course. Could these
        dogs pick up on that smell as a possible bomb? I could explain the
        situation but I would like to do so without a gun pointed at my
        head. The issue was avoided because the dogs never made it to my
        lane but what if they did? Is there a way to prevent getting the
        dogs & officers excited?

        Roger 2


        --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin Windsor"
        <kevin.windsor@...> wrote:
        >
        > There is no problem bringing it across the border.
        >
        >
        >
        > Flintlock muskets were exempted under Canada's firearm legislation
        and black
        > powder is okay.
        >
        > You still have to declare it (as with any weapon) but you do not
        need a
        > hunting permit, gun license, blood transfusion, baseball card or
        anything.
        >
        >
        >
        > The Cdn Border guard will say, "welcome to Canada; where are you
        going?"
        >
        > You say, "to Crysler's farm for a War of 1812 re-enactment!"
        >
        > "Do you have any weapons?"
        >
        > "Yes a flintlock musket and 1 pound of black powder"
        >
        > "Are you bringing in any meat, citrus fruit, or firewood?"
        >
        > "No"
        >
        > "thank you enjoy your stay"
        >
        >
        >
        > Pretty easy, I do it all the time; it is no big deal. . .
        >
        >
        >
        > Kevin
        >
        > 89th
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > _____
        >
        > From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf
        > Of Thomas Moore
        >
        >
        >
        > I have been reading all the messages on passports and I have
        recently
        > acquired mine so I am set there. What is the ruling about bringing
        > weapons across the border and, or, black powder cartridges?
        >
        > Tom Moore
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Chris McKay
        This has come up before, and people keep saying this, but that s incorrect. Antique Firearms (and replicas) do not need to be registered currently in Canada -
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 2, 2009
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          This has come up before, and people keep saying this, but that's
          incorrect. Antique Firearms (and replicas) do not need to be
          registered currently in Canada - true. However, that does NOT mean
          they aren't firearms. They are firearms and you still need to declare
          them.

          Chris McKay

          --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Roger" <Rogerheiple@...> wrote:
          >
          > When asked if I have any "firearms", I say 'no, however I do have an
          > antique reproduction with blank ammunition'.
          >
          > This has been discussed before but I believe a smoothbore, flintlock
          > is not considered a `firearm' or is at least exempt under Canada's
          > laws. So, technically the answer to the question about firearms
          > is 'no' but I always declare the flintlocks.
        • HAROLD DENNISON
          Chris is quite correct. While we are exempted from having to carry permits for them, they are none the less firearms and must be declared. Hal Dennison
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 2, 2009
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            Chris is quite correct. While we are exempted from having to carry permits for them, they are none the less firearms and must be declared.


            Hal Dennison
            1-800-385-9630
            www.JustDreamLife.com
             
            I teach people like "you" how to make six figure incomes working from home.

            --- On Mon, 3/2/09, Chris McKay <PrivateCannon@...> wrote:

            From: Chris McKay <PrivateCannon@...>
            Subject: 1812 Re: Crossing the border - what about looking like you have a bomb?
            To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
            Received: Monday, March 2, 2009, 9:42 AM






            This has come up before, and people keep saying this, but that's
            incorrect. Antique Firearms (and replicas) do not need to be
            registered currently in Canada - true. However, that does NOT mean
            they aren't firearms. They are firearms and you still need to declare
            them.

            Chris McKay

            --- In WarOf1812@yahoogrou ps.com, "Roger" <Rogerheiple@ ...> wrote:
            >
            > When asked if I have any "firearms", I say 'no, however I do have an
            > antique reproduction with blank ammunition'.
            >
            > This has been discussed before but I believe a smoothbore, flintlock
            > is not considered a `firearm' or is at least exempt under Canada's
            > laws. So, technically the answer to the question about firearms
            > is 'no' but I always declare the flintlocks.
















            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Kevin Windsor
            Thank you Chris! KW
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 2, 2009
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              Thank you Chris!

              KW


              >From: "Chris McKay" <PrivateCannon@...>
              >
              >This has come up before, and people keep saying this, but that's
              >incorrect. Antique Firearms (and replicas) do not need to be
              >registered currently in Canada - true. However, that does NOT mean
              >they aren't firearms. They are firearms and you still need to declare
              >them.
              >
              >Chris McKay
            • whittakermp
              There is much pertinent information available from the Canadian Firearms Program at www.cfc-cafc.gc.ca. This is a snippet from
              Message 6 of 12 , Mar 3, 2009
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                There is much pertinent information available from the Canadian
                Firearms Program at www.cfc-cafc.gc.ca.

                This is a snippet from
                www.cfc-cafc.gc.ca/factsheets/powder_e.asp

                Muzzleloaders Made Before 1898

                All black powder muzzleloaders made before 1898 are classified as
                antique firearms. Antique firearms are exempt from the licence and
                registration requirements set out in the Firearms Act.

                Muzzleloaders Made After 1898

                All matchlock, flintlock and wheel lock long guns are classified as
                antiques no matter when they were made. Like older firearms of these
                types, they are exempt from the licence and registration
                requirements set out in the Firearms Act.


                Michael Whittaker
              • John Matthew IV
                Michael Whittaker quoted the Canadian Firearms Program: Muzzleloaders Made Before 1898 Muzzleloaders Made After 1898 Did something happen in 1898
                Message 7 of 12 , Mar 3, 2009
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                  Michael Whittaker quoted the Canadian Firearms Program:

                  Muzzleloaders Made Before 1898
                  <snip>

                  Muzzleloaders Made After 1898
                  <snip>

                  Did something happen in 1898 or was that just a year the legislators
                  aribitrarily picked?



                  John Matthew IV
                • ANDREW BATEMAN
                  AFAIK, 1898 is a year they arbitrarily picked, but it also happens to coincide with US law.  In the States, any firearm made before 1898 falls under
                  Message 8 of 12 , Mar 3, 2009
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                    AFAIK, 1898 is a year they arbitrarily picked, but it also happens to coincide with US law.  In the States, any firearm made before 1898 falls under "Curios and Relics" and you do not need federal paperwork to buy or sell it.  In Canada, some pre-1898 firearms are controlled under the firearms act (most handguns and cartridge guns) while others are not (muzzleloading long guns, single shot breechloaders for cartridges over 8.5mm, and even some handguns in obsolete calibers).
                     
                    Andrew Bateman, 41st Foot

                    --- On Tue, 3/3/09, John Matthew IV <john.matthew@...> wrote:

                    From: John Matthew IV <john.matthew@...>
                    Subject: Re: 1812 Re: Crossing the border - Some useful information
                    To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                    Received: Tuesday, March 3, 2009, 2:42 PM

                    Michael Whittaker quoted the Canadian Firearms Program:

                    Muzzleloaders Made Before 1898
                    <snip>

                    Muzzleloaders Made After 1898
                    <snip>

                    Did something happen in 1898 or was that just a year the legislators
                    aribitrarily picked?



                    John Matthew IV







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                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • RICHARD HARDMAN
                    Legislators arbitary pick.  However, the significance is that caplocks (Muskets, Fowlers, Rifles and Pistols) and flintlock pistols made before 1898 are
                    Message 9 of 12 , Mar 3, 2009
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                      Legislators arbitary pick.  However, the significance is that caplocks (Muskets, Fowlers, Rifles and Pistols) and flintlock pistols made before 1898 are antiques but those made after have to be registered. 

                      It is interesting to note that my 1851 Navy Colt by Colt Manufacturing pre-1898 is an antique but my 1851 Navy Colt made by Uberti is registered.  Their relative condition is about the same but the real Colt shoots better.  It is also worth a lot more money than the repro.  I am looking for an original British Flintlock Pistol in reasonable condition if anyone cares to sell one.
                      Richard Hardman




                      ________________________________
                      From: John Matthew IV <john.matthew@...>
                      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2009 9:42:05 AM
                      Subject: Re: 1812 Re: Crossing the border - Some useful information


                      Michael Whittaker quoted the Canadian Firearms Program:

                      Muzzleloaders Made Before 1898
                      <snip>

                      Muzzleloaders Made After 1898
                      <snip>

                      Did something happen in 1898 or was that just a year the legislators
                      aribitrarily picked?

                      John Matthew IV




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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