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Re: 1812 More enlightened commentary on the Plains of Abraham

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  • Tom Hurlbut
    Re Globe letter: It is perhaps fortunate that in English Canada these sorts of comments are regarded as humorous and people seldom take it seriously.
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 29, 2009
      Re Globe letter:

      It is perhaps fortunate that in English Canada these sorts of comments are regarded as humorous and people seldom take it seriously. Certainly, while re-enacting some battle might stir some negative feelings, I doubt that anything more than minor complaints would be the result.

      Also, with the exception of the native situation, when it was over the main protagonists in the 1812 war congratulated themselves on a job well done (which it wasn't!!) picked up their respective bats and balls and went home to write a history on how they won. (example: "Canadian Militia saves Canada!")

      Despite the fact that France effectively abandoned Quebec as a project too remote (and certainly too expensive!) to properly support, there is a vocal French Canadian faction that would prefer to think that they'd be better off as a French colony. (I suppose these are the ones who continue to elect a regional party to represent them in Federal politics! ;-)

      To address the idea of the 1812 bicentennial (perhaps more relevant to this list), we need to look at what battles might stir negative feelings and how to avoid them (the feelings, I mean) if we believe that's likely. What events would have a negative impact and what groups would be offended? Ideas?

      I would certainly like to attend as many 200th anniversary events as I can and do them with taste and respect for the original participants. I would not sugar coat history but might avoid some of the uglier aspects. (I believe massacres are best talked about, not re-lived.)

      However, I anticipate a number of conflicts in terms of dates. Also, some major battles no longer have appropriate sites on which to re-enact them. How do we do those?

      I think these are the issues we should be examining as we approach the bicentennial.

      Cheers!

      "Major" Tom



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