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Re: 1812 advancing the guns

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  • suthren@magma.ca
    Peter In 1998 I was with a battery of two naval gun crews with 3-pounders at a Rev War event at Quebec. We were fitter than the infantry and stayed on the
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 3, 2008
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      Peter

      In 1998 I was with a battery of two naval gun crews with 3-pounders at a Rev War event at Quebec. We were fitter than the infantry and stayed on the flanks easily as they moved. Officers in command were so unnerved by the experience, however, that we were relegated to static battery firing the next day. Not everyone can handle moving guns.

      Vic
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: peter monahan
      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, November 03, 2008 7:40 AM
      Subject: 1812 advancing the guns


      Good morning

      Just came from You Tube, where I was watching Michael Matthews clip of
      Mississinewa. A clip which also showed up with it I found quiote
      intriguing. Google 'the battle of Deltuva, Lithuania, Ukmerge 2008'.

      In brief, it shows 3 reenactors each advancing a gun in concert with an
      infantry advance. There's a shot of one as the clip begins and it
      appears to be pwerhaps -I'm no gunner - a 2/3 scale 4 pounder on a full
      size carriage.

      My point is that this tactical use might have application in our period
      and on our field. Whether it is historically acceptable and can be
      safely done I leave to the swabbies and gunners to fight out.

      Cheers
      Peter





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    • whittakermp
      Peter: As a member of the Continetal Line s United Train of Artillery of Rhode Island, I can say on most occasions our three-pounder gun(s) and others are
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 3, 2008
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        Peter:

        As a member of the Continetal Line's United Train of Artillery of
        Rhode Island, I can say on most occasions our three-pounder gun(s)
        and others are employed as battalion guns in line with the infantry
        and move accordingly.

        In the past, the UTA has held artillery schools in which the
        infantry participated. I have found most CL units are comfortable
        with the guns in the field.

        From time to time, some members of the opposing line approaches too
        closely to the guns. This is diminshing with education.

        However, I have seen, when in battery, the other side disregard the
        guns and come too close. We withdraw and they claim victory. Ah, for
        the lack of cannister and grape. Their officers seen of late more
        inclined to pull their rankers back from the muzzles.

        I have been with the UTA more than 10 years and our preferred modus
        operandi has been as battalion guns.

        The UTA has three rules. Be safe; be happy; or go home. If one or
        both of the first can't be met, put the third into operation.

        Safety is always paramount.

        Michael
      • BritcomHMP@aol.com
        Officers in command were so unnerved by the experience, however, that we were relegated to static battery firing the next day. Not everyone can handle moving
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 3, 2008
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          Officers in command were so unnerved by the experience, however, that we were relegated to static battery firing the next day. Not everyone can handle moving guns.





          --------------------------------------

          Vic,

          I would hate to think that our 1812 officers were so 'windy' guns, properly and safely handled are a great asset and frankly if it worries those commanding the infantry, then they need more training. With our current crop of 1812 officers, routinely riding horses in action and use to working with all arms of the service I think that moving guns would be no problem, given a large enough field of course!

          Cheers,

          Tim



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        • Stephen Allie
          Used to command a horse drawn section (2 Guns) with fully mounted crew worked with both foot and horse never was a problem in coordination or safety. Trust and
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 3, 2008
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            Used to command a horse drawn section (2 Guns) with fully mounted crew
            worked with both foot and horse never was a problem in coordination or
            safety. Trust and training are the key.
            Capt. Allie
            95th
          • LCpl_rm
            Chris Ward at the GT moved his gun up as the line moved forward. Granted that he kept well to the side of the line as to make sure there were no infractions
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 3, 2008
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              Chris Ward at the GT moved his gun up as the line moved forward. Granted that he kept well to the side of the line as to make sure there were no infractions or reactions whatsoever but he still kept pace to the advance with no problems from the MD Park personnel. When we moved onto the hill skirmish, Chris moved from the right of the line to the left in support.

              Cheers,

              Ed Seufert, Cpl
              1812 Royal Marines
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: BritcomHMP@...
              To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, November 03, 2008 11:27 AM
              Subject: Re: 1812 advancing the guns




              Officers in command were so unnerved by the experience, however, that we were relegated to static battery firing the next day. Not everyone can handle moving guns.

              --------------------------------------

              Vic,

              I would hate to think that our 1812 officers were so 'windy' guns, properly and safely handled are a great asset and frankly if it worries those commanding the infantry, then they need more training. With our current crop of 1812 officers, routinely riding horses in action and use to working with all arms of the service I think that moving guns would be no problem, given a large enough field of course!

              Cheers,

              Tim


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