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Re: 1812 The 102nd Regiment in North America

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  • John Potter
    Thanks Ed, I thought they must be given the different accounts of the uniforms. I ll have to try to find out more about the 102nd and where they were during
    Message 1 of 18 , Sep 30, 2008
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      Thanks Ed,

      I thought they must be given the different accounts of the uniforms.

      I'll have to try to find out more about the 102nd and where they were
      during the burning of Washington.

      Cheers,

      John



      --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "LCpl_rm" <LCpl_RM@...> wrote:
      >
      > The Chasseurs Britanniques were definitely a separate unit from the
      Independent Company of Foreigners. Here's some info I found on the
      Napoleon_series website:
      >
      > The following is from: Émigré & Foreign Troops in British Service
      (1) 1803 - 15 Osprey Men-at-Arms #328 by Rene Chartrand and Patrice
      Courcelle Page 10
      > "Formed from May 1801 from remnants of Condé's Army following Peace
      of Luneville -- conlcuded February 1801 between France and most
      European powers, but not Britain -- under Col. John Ramsay, former
      Inspector General of Foreign Corps. Regiment to serve only in Europe
      and the Mediterranean, forming light infantry battalion of six
      companies mustering about 600 men. Besides French émigrés many
      Germans, Poles and Seiss enlisted, but officers remained French.
      Embarked from Trieste, arriving Malta in early June, Egypt in August
      1801 as reinforcements at ALexandria. Saw little action; back on
      Malta by December 1801, remaining until 1803."
      >
      > "Uniform: Green coatee with black or yellow collar, black half-
      lapels pointed cuffs, shoulder straps and turnbacks, pewter buttons;
      grey long breeches, black half-gaiters; cylindrical shako, white
      metal bugle horn badge, black cockade, green plume; black
      accoutremts; some apparently armed with German Rifles."
      >
      > The following is from: Émigré & Foreign Troops in British Service
      (2) 1803 - 15 Osprey Men-at-Arms #335 by Rene Chartrand and Patrice
      Courcelle Pages 14 - 15
      >
      > "The regiment was brought to England in 1803 to incorporate other
      emigres on the Isle of Wight, and then sent on to Malta. In 1804 its
      seven-company establishment was raised to the usual ten including two
      flank companies. From November 1805 the corps was in Naples, until
      transferred to Sicily in January 1806. In June and July it campaigned
      in Calabria but was not at the battle of Maida. However, three
      companies were part of the British force that captured Regio on 9
      July; incorporating over 300 French prisoners, the unit was back in
      Sicily by September. It sailed in March 1807 with the British
      expedition to Egypt, which proved disastrous: the Chasseurs suffered
      some 300 casualties covering the retreat on 31 March. The unit
      remained in Alexandria until September, incorporating some of the
      officers and men from Froberg's corps. It then went to Sicily and
      absorbed other groups of foreigners. The corps participated in the
      raid on the island of Ischia and Scilla on 24 and 30 June 1809."
      >
      > "In November 1810 the unit had some 1,740 men in 12 companies when
      sent to Cadiz, Spain, where two companies were left until 1813
      serving with the Foreign Recruits Battalion. The corps went on to
      Lisbon in January 1811 and joined Wellington's army in March. It saw
      much action in the Peninsula, starting at Fuentes d'Onoro (4-5 May
      1811) where Wellington noted its bravery. Other actions were the
      first attempt on Badajos (7-10 June), Ciudad Rodrigo (19 January
      1812), Larena (19 March), siege of Salamanca (21-28 June), Retiro (16
      August), Olmos (20 October), Vittoria (21 June 1813), Pvrenees (30
      July), Bidassoa (31 August), Nivelle (10 November), Nive (9 December)
      and Orthez (27 February 1814) - the last major battle. Napoleon's
      popularity was now eroding fast, and when the Chasseurs Britanniques
      arrived at Bordeaux escorting the Duke of Angouleme on 12 March 1814
      the city had turned Royalist."
      >
      > "By then there were few emigres left in the regiment except for
      officers, the rank and file being filled with 'professional
      deserters' from all over Europe. Desertion had become rampant in the
      corps, some 224 men taking leave in 1813; it was not allowed to post
      pickets for fear they would desert. However, in battle they proved
      steady, often suffering heavy casualties. Following Napoleon's
      abdication the British troops started to evacuate France and the
      Chasseurs Britanniques left Bordeaux in July for England. A
      detachment served as marines on board HMS Ramillies off the American
      coast during the summer. The regiment was disbanded at Lymington on 5
      October 1814."
      >
      > From Philip Haythornthwaite's Uniforms of the Peninsular War: 1807 -
      1814 Page 110
      >
      > "One of the 'foreign corps' of the British army, the Chasseurs
      Britanniques was formed in 1801 from French emigres, by 181 1
      including many exprisoners of war and deserters, Italians, Poles and
      Swiss. Officers were mainly French royalists who hated the Bonaparte
      regime and those efforts alone made the Chasseurs into a reasonable
      fighting unit, commended by Wellington for steadiness at Fuentes de
      Ofioro (but when forming ladder-parties at the storm of Baclajos
      threw their burdens away and fled)! Their desertion record was
      severe, arriving in the Peninsula in 1811 they lost 139 men in that
      year, 171 in 1812 and 224 in 1813, including a platoon of two
      corporals and 16 men deserting en masse in October 1812, all Italians
      save for one Swiss and one Croat. As many of the rank and file had
      only enlisted in the hopes of deserting back to the French, they were
      never allowed on outpost duty. They wore infantry uniform with light
      blue facings, lace silver for officers and white with light blue and
      red stripes for others. One portrait shows an officer with a red
      collar; that illustrated wears light company distinctions,
      > bugle-horn badgeson turnbacks and wings, and flank company sabre;
      battalion company officers wore the usual epaulettes and bicorn.
      Discrepancies of uniform probably existed within the unit, for
      Wellington enquired of the commanding officer in February 1811,
      regarding recruits arrived from Gibraltar, 'in what mode' he
      intended 'to clothe and equip them' for service'. The Chasseurs
      Britanniques should not be confused with the wretched companies
      of 'Independent Foreigners' who committed every conceivable outrage
      in the descent on Chesapeake Bay."
      >
      > They also had a book written about them called Wellington's Mongrel
      Regiment: A History of the Chasseurs Britanniques Regiment of the
      British Army 1801-1814 by Alistair Nichols in 2005.
      >
      > Cheers,
      >
      > Ed Seufert, Cpl
      > 1812 Royal Marines
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: LCpl_rm
      > To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 12:19 AM
      > Subject: Re: 1812 The 102nd Regiment in North America
      >
      >
      > John,
      >
      > According to Hamilton-Smith's print, the Independent Company of
      Foreigners (ICF) wore uniforms similiar to the 95th: green jackets
      with black facings but with white trim and grey trousers.
      Interestingly he also shows a Chasseurs Britanniques uniform of red
      with light blue facing. But de Roll and de Meuron also show similiar
      uniforms so I'll have to figure who the Chasseurs really were. The
      Chasseurs are listed with a Colonel in chief whereas the ICF are not.
      >
      > Per the 102nd being involved in the burning of the White Houose,
      unless men were singularly enlisted in another regiment, that would
      be a negative. After the battle of Bladensburg, Ross advanced into
      the District to receive its surrender with his 3rd Brigade which was
      made up of the 21st and the 2nd Batt Royal Marines. The other two
      brigades (4th, 44th and 85th) were totally involved at the battle and
      stayed behind to rest up and care for their wounded. Eventually they
      would join Ross on the eastern side of the city.
      >
      > Several sources state that Ross left the majority of the brigade
      on the outskirts and entered the city proper with about 200 men and
      his staff along with Admiral Cockburn. Who burned the White House?
      No 3 Co of the 21st claims title. But Harry Smith says in his
      autobiography that "our sailors were artists at the work" igniting
      everything flammable. Anthony Pitch in his book, "The Burning of
      Washington", refers to Midshipman Samuel Davies as leading the
      sailors thru the mansion. Pack's "The Man who Burned the White
      House" says Lt Pratt of the Navy led the party. And Whitehorne
      in "The Battle for Baltimore" notes that the Royal Sappers and Miners
      under the command of Capt Blanchard, RE, was responsible. So take
      your pick but it wasn't the 102nd.
      >
      > The 102nd was still in Bermuda as of 11 March 1814 based on a
      letter from Admiral Cochrane. J Mackay Hitsman in "The Incredible
      War of 1812" mentions that the 102nd was brought from Bermuda and
      landed at Moose Island in Passamaquoddy Bay occupying Eastport Maine
      on 11 July 1814. Henry Adams' "The War of 1812" says the same
      thing. It looks like the 102nd spent the latter half of 1814 and
      early1815 occupying eastern Maine.
      >
      > Cheers,
      >
      > Ed Seufert, Cpl
      > 1812 Royal Marines
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: John Potter
      > To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Sunday, September 28, 2008 10:25 PM
      > Subject: Re: 1812 The 102nd Regiment in North America
      >
      >
      >
      > Thanks Ed,
      >
      > Are you able to clarify their uniform for me..? I have a
      Penninsula
      > War book at home that shows them (if I recall correctly) in red
      coats
      > with light blue facings but the 1812 website article shows them
      in a
      > Rifles style uniform...??
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > John
      >
      > --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "LCpl_rm" <LCpl_RM@> wrote:
      > >
      > > According to Hickey, the "Independent Companies of
      Foreigners" were
      > given the title of Chasseurs Britannique by Lossing in his
      Pictorial
      > History of the War. Unfortunately Col Beckwith, whose command
      they
      > were under in the Chesapeake, labeled them as the "Canadian
      > Chasseurs" in his official report of the actions at Hampton.
      > The "Canadian Chasseurs" was actually from lower Canada.
      > >
      > > Cheers,
      > >
      > > Ed Seufert, Cpl
      > > 1812 Royal Marines
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: John Potter
      > > To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Friday, September 26, 2008 9:49 PM
      > > Subject: Re: 1812 The 102nd Regiment in North America
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi Brian,
      > >
      > > Thanks for the info. Was this Independant Company the same
      mob as
      > the
      > > Chasseurs Britannique, the former French POW's..?
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > >
      > > John
      > >
      > > --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, Brian Howard <chippokes@>
      wrote:
      > > >
      > > > John,
      > > > Yes, the 102nd did participate in a number of actions and
      raids
      > > here in the Chesapeake region. The most notable of which is
      the
      > > engagement at Craney Island, June 22, 1813, where the 102nd,
      > > Independent Company of Foreigners, Royal Marines and Royal
      Navy
      > > forces participated. This engagement was an American victory
      as
      > the
      > > goals of Adm. Cochburn, taking the town of Portsmouth,
      destroying
      > the
      > > Gosport Navy Yard, capturing the USF Constellation, and the
      city
      > of
      > > Norfolk, were stopped at the Island.
      > > >
      > > > Unfortunately for the town of Hampton on June 25, 1813, the
      > before
      > > mentioned British units attacked the 500 or so militia
      outside
      > > Hampton and drove them from the field. The War of 1812
      Website
      > has a
      > > great article on the crimes committed in Hampton by the
      > Independent
      > > Company of Foreigners. I do not know if the 102nd assisted in
      > > sacking the town but a few rogues may have taken the
      opportunity.
      > > >
      > > > After Hampton, the Crown forces continued to make raids all
      > around
      > > the Chesapeake region both upper and lower.
      > > >
      > > > Not much information but I hope that helps.
      > > >
      > > > Brian Howard
      > > > 20th US Inf / Fort Norfolk Garrison
      > > >
      > > > --- On Thu, 9/25/08, John Potter <potts4259@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > From: John Potter <potts4259@>
      > > > Subject: 1812 The 102nd Regiment in North America
      > > > To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Date: Thursday, September 25, 2008, 8:35 PM
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > G'day all,
      > > >
      > > > Now that I am all fired up again after the fun of last
      weekend,
      > I
      > > > started re-reading my one book on the War of 1812 and was
      > reminded
      > > of
      > > > the 102nd Regiment (formerly the NSW Corps) which was sent
      to
      > the
      > > US
      > > > after being sent home from Australia in disgrace. They
      suffered
      > > from
      > > > a poor reputation in NSW and were known as the Rum Corps
      from
      > their
      > > > officers dubious (but lucrative) speculation in and
      complete
      > > control
      > > > of the rum trade and the economy generally. Many of their
      > soldiers
      > > > were also poor quality having come from the Savoy (prison)
      and
      > > other
      > > > regiments who dumped them on this unfortunate unit. By the
      time
      > > they
      > > > came to the US however, many of the original members of the
      > unit
      > > > would have left, so I don't know how well they acquitted
      > themselves
      > > > here.
      > > >
      > > > I believe they took part in some raids along the Atlantic
      coast
      > > > (including the sack of Hampton, VA) which apparently they
      were
      > > > prevented from joining in, and were involved in the British
      > capture
      > > > of Maine but was I wondering if anyone knows any more
      detail
      > about
      > > > them or the actions they were involved in. In America I
      think
      > they
      > > > were also known as the Botany Bay Rangers and were under
      the
      > > command
      > > > of LtCol Charles Napier if that helps anyone at all.
      > > >
      > > > This is a much neglected area of research in Australia but
      I
      > > > understand that it's just possible that the 102nd had the
      first
      > > > Australian born soldiers to serve overseas in it's ranks.
      > (There
      > > was
      > > > also would you believe an Australian born Royal Engineer
      > officer at
      > > > Waterloo) Could've been a fun unit to recreate here if I
      was
      > going
      > > to
      > > > be staying longer..!
      > > >
      > > > Cheers and thanks in advance,
      > > >
      > > > John
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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