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US-French relations - was RE: 1812 Officer / NCO school...?

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  • mimathews@comcast.net
    Do you have anything to add to the suggestions of French direct involvement with America going to war? My knowledge in the area is limited so I would welcome
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 3, 2008
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      Do you have anything to add to the suggestions of French direct involvement with America going to war? My knowledge in the area is limited so I would welcome reading suggestions or more bits of information. I know that Joel Barlow was plenipotentiary to France from 1811 to 1812 and that he was charged with negotiating a commercial treaty with France and with getting restitution or indemnity for confiscated/held American goods. It appears on the surface that he never met Napoleon personally though obviously that doesn't preclude bribes, etc. and Barlow held French citizenship as well as American. He was summoned to a meeting with Napoleon during the retreat from Moscow, failed to rendezvous at Vilna and died in December. I didn't look up info on his replacement since we were already at war.

      Although Citizen Genet was famous for his attempts to bring America in the French Revolutionary Wars, he retired in 1793 to the simple life in the Hudson Valley. I wasn't able to find who followed him or might have tried to influence the war movement.

      Thanks,
      Michael

      --
      A Truism - For every action, there is an equal and opposite criticism.

      -------------- Original message --------------
      From: "Gord Deans" <gord.deans@...>
      John asked:
      "isn't the War of 1812 considered part of the Napoleonic Wars
      here...?"

      The North American answer would be "NO."

      However, taking the broader French / Napoleonic point of view, it was
      a second front in the Napoleonic War that was meant to distract and
      weaken the British. I am sure that there was French intervention
      behind the scenes to provoke the Americans into declaring war (and
      they thought that they were just going shopping). Although the United
      States was almost as equally prone to declare war on France as on
      Britain as a result of the trade embargoes, French manipulations
      probably tipped the balance.

      "When gold changes hands, it also usually changes hearts." Who knows
      what great American family fortune began with the War of 1812 in spite
      of an economy that was about to collapse.

      Michael, here is your popcorn.




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