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Re: 1812 Re: Ladies and Women – there was a difference in the 1800’s

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  • BritcomHMP@aol.com
    In a message dated 8/8/2008 7:18:36 PM Central Daylight Time, ronaldjdale@netscape.net writes: All activities work well at a re-enactment and the audience
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 8, 2008
      In a message dated 8/8/2008 7:18:36 PM Central Daylight Time,
      ronaldjdale@... writes:

      All activities work well at a re-enactment and the audience loves it
      but it should be interpreted with the re-enactors correcting any false
      impression that may be given that soldiers' and officers' wives
      accompanied their men to the battlefields in Canada during the War of
      1812.


      --------------------------

      Well Ron I think it should be borne in mind that it is no more inaccurate
      than women who look like women standing in the ranks along with the men! Indeed
      as very few camps are truly run as they would have been in 1812 one could
      argue that they are more areas for military interpretation than working military
      camps (can't think when I last saw a quarterguard posted) so showing the
      womens role in the period army is perfectly valid.

      Cheers

      Tim



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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • bolton1812
      ... it ... false ... War of ... inaccurate ... the men! Indeed ... one could ... working military ... showing the ... ...or an Army truely on Campaign ie. no
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 9, 2008
        --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, BritcomHMP@... wrote:
        >
        >
        > In a message dated 8/8/2008 7:18:36 PM Central Daylight Time,
        > ronaldjdale@... writes:
        >
        > All activities work well at a re-enactment and the audience loves
        it
        > but it should be interpreted with the re-enactors correcting any
        false
        > impression that may be given that soldiers' and officers' wives
        > accompanied their men to the battlefields in Canada during the
        War of
        > 1812.
        >
        >
        > --------------------------
        >
        > Well Ron I think it should be borne in mind that it is no more
        inaccurate
        > than women who look like women standing in the ranks along with
        the men! Indeed
        > as very few camps are truly run as they would have been in 1812
        one could
        > argue that they are more areas for military interpretation than
        working military
        > camps (can't think when I last saw a quarterguard posted) so
        showing the
        > womens role in the period army is perfectly valid.
        >
        > Cheers
        >
        > Tim

        ...or an Army truely on Campaign ie. no tents!
        Cheers,
        Bob Bolton
        >
        >
        >
        > **************Looking for a car that's sporty, fun and fits in
        your budget?
        > Read reviews on AOL Autos.
        > (http://autos.aol.com/cars-BMW-128-2008/expert-review?
        ncid=aolaut00050000000017 )
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Kevin Windsor
        This past June at Stoney Creek, the Light Coy of the Royal Scots posted a quarter guard camp. KW _____ From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 10, 2008
          This past June at Stoney Creek, the Light Coy of the Royal Scots posted a
          quarter guard camp.



          KW



          _____

          From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
          Of BritcomHMP@...
          Sent: August 8, 2008 11:39 PM



          (can't think when I last saw a quarterguard posted)



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • annbwass@aol.com
          In a message dated 8/11/2008 7:03:52 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ebolton123@comcast.net writes: Was that not the main cause of death for women in the 18th and
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 11, 2008
            In a message dated 8/11/2008 7:03:52 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
            ebolton123@... writes:

            Was that not the main cause of death for
            women in the 18th and early 19th centuries?



            No, no, no!

            Ann Wass



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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • JGIL1812@aol.com
            In a message dated 8/11/2008 4:15:30 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, ebolton123@comcast.net writes: ... well sir, tell me something. If this battle was so bad
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 11, 2008
              In a message dated 8/11/2008 4:15:30 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
              ebolton123@... writes:

              ..."well sir, tell me something. If
              this battle was so bad (50,000 killed and wounded?) why don't I see
              any bullet holes in the monuments?" As I looked around I was
              actually astonished to see a dozen other folks nodding their heads
              in agreement with her question!



              Bob,

              I'd be interested to know how you "corrected" this ladies impression of
              bullet ridden monuments?

              JG/RE



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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • bolton1812
              ... ...and silly me, I got that info from interpreters at a State run Pa. historical site. You mean,( with the Home Alone surprised look on my face),
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 13, 2008
                --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, annbwass@... wrote:
                >
                >
                > In a message dated 8/11/2008 7:03:52 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
                > ebolton123@... writes:
                >
                > Was that not the main cause of death for
                > women in the 18th and early 19th centuries?
                >
                >
                >
                > No, no, no!
                >
                > Ann Wass

                ...and silly me, I got that info from interpreters at a State run
                Pa. historical site. You mean,( with the Home Alone surprised look
                on my face), historical interpreters don't always know what they're
                talking about?(!) Nooooooo, can't be.
                Cheers,
                Bob Bolton
                >
                >
                >
                > **************Looking for a car that's sporty, fun and fits in
                your budget?
                > Read reviews on AOL Autos.
                > (http://autos.aol.com/cars-BMW-128-2008/expert-review?
                ncid=aolaut00050000000017 )
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • annbwass@aol.com
                In a message dated 8/17/2008 10:49:47 AM Eastern Daylight Time, saultcitysoo@yahoo.ca writes: Actually, I believe it was consumption (TB). You know, the
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 18, 2008
                  In a message dated 8/17/2008 10:49:47 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
                  saultcitysoo@... writes:

                  Actually, I believe it was consumption (TB).



                  You know, the question of causes of death is, of course, an interesting one,
                  and I'm pondering how to try to research it. (Too busy with my main project
                  right now to go and hunt out books on the subject, although I'm sure there
                  are some--if anyone on the list knows one, please share). My sense is,
                  though, that it isn't really known. I don't believe cause of death was regularly
                  and systematically recorded, and even if it had been, how accurate would it
                  be, given the state of medical science? Things like burns, or complications of
                  childbirth, or being killed in a barn collapse would be fairly obvious. But
                  the various diseases? And, given the treatments for same (bleeding,
                  purging, and blistering were all still common), I often wonder if someone were ill,
                  if the treatment might not worsen the condition. And what physician would
                  admit that? There are, of course, snippets in letters and diaries, along the
                  lines of "Just heard so and so died of such and such." But probably not
                  enough to compile a complete picture.

                  Ann Wass



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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • ronpontiac
                  A number of years ago Parks Canada acquired the medical register for the Precott Garrison. While it begins in the 1830 s, I am sure that many of the
                  Message 8 of 11 , Aug 18, 2008
                    A number of years ago Parks Canada acquired the medical register for
                    the Precott Garrison. While it begins in the 1830's, I am sure that
                    many of the prescriptions and medical procedures would have been the
                    same in 1812. What is interesting is that the nature of the ailment,
                    the diagnosis and treatment are all noted in the book. Soldiers and
                    their families were treated. As Ann noted, some of the treatments may
                    have been worse than the malady. An example, a man who was constipated
                    was to drink up to one pound of mercury until the problem was resolved.

                    Many of the elixers featured a strong dose of alcohol leading me to
                    believe that if the potion failed to work, the sufferer would forget
                    what he was being treated for.

                    The register was microfilmed by Parks Canada and I am sure could be
                    accessed by the avid student of medical practice in the 19th century.

                    Ron Dale
                  • Ray Hobbs
                    Gareth Newfeild, of the Drums, and the War Museum in Ottawa, is doing extensive research on British Army Medical Practice during the War of 1812. I hope he is
                    Message 9 of 11 , Aug 18, 2008
                      Gareth Newfeild, of the Drums, and the War Museum in Ottawa, is doing
                      extensive research on British Army Medical Practice during the War of
                      1812. I hope he is on this list. His work is outstanding.
                      Ray Hobbs
                      41st

                      PS: A Commission met in (I believe) 1815, to clean up medical practice
                      in Upper Canada. they demanded better qualifications, and certain
                      pracices for specific ailments. Soon after, licensing became the norm
                      in the Province.

                      On 18-Aug-08, at 12:15 PM, ronpontiac wrote:

                      > A number of years ago Parks Canada acquired the medical register for
                      > the Precott Garrison. While it begins in the 1830's, I am sure that
                      > many of the prescriptions and medical procedures would have been the
                      > same in 1812. What is interesting is that the nature of the ailment,
                      > the diagnosis and treatment are all noted in the book. Soldiers and
                      > their families were treated. As Ann noted, some of the treatments may
                      > have been worse than the malady. An example, a man who was constipated
                      > was to drink up to one pound of mercury until the problem was
                      > resolved.
                      >
                      > Many of the elixers featured a strong dose of alcohol leading me to
                      > believe that if the potion failed to work, the sufferer would forget
                      > what he was being treated for.
                      >
                      > The register was microfilmed by Parks Canada and I am sure could be
                      > accessed by the avid student of medical practice in the 19th century.
                      >
                      > Ron Dale
                      >
                      >
                      >

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • BritcomHMP@aol.com
                      In a message dated 8/18/2008 11:26:40 AM Central Daylight Time, ray.hobbs@sympatico.ca writes: Gareth Newfeild, of the Drums, and the War Museum in Ottawa, is
                      Message 10 of 11 , Aug 18, 2008
                        In a message dated 8/18/2008 11:26:40 AM Central Daylight Time,
                        ray.hobbs@... writes:

                        Gareth Newfeild, of the Drums, and the War Museum in Ottawa, is doing
                        extensive research on British Army Medical Practice during the War of
                        1812. I hope he is on this list. His work is outstanding.
                        Ray Hobbs


                        --------------------------------------

                        I trust he is aware of the medical journal on wounds suffered at the battle
                        of Waterloo, aling with some rather horific watercolours drawn from life, in
                        the museum at the Royal College of Surgeons, London.



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                      • whittakermp
                        As Ron noted, A number of years ago Parks Canada acquired the medical register for the Prescott Garrison. The register is on display and open on the main
                        Message 11 of 11 , Aug 19, 2008
                          As Ron noted, "A number of years ago Parks Canada acquired the medical
                          register for the Prescott Garrison."

                          The register is on display and open on the main floor of the
                          blockhouse at Fort Wellington. When I looked at it earlier this summer
                          there was an interesting thread of entries on a soldier being treated
                          for VD.

                          Michael Whittaker
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