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RE: 1812 Re: Brock's Monument

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  • Ian Gardner
    Brock s Adjutant. Led a second charge to try to retake the Redan Battery after the death of Brock. IIRC, he had his horse shot out from under him during the
    Message 1 of 39 , Aug 1 10:36 AM
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      Brock's Adjutant. Led a second charge to try to retake the Redan Battery
      after the death of Brock. IIRC, he had his horse shot out from under him
      during the charge and was crushed, lingering 'til a little after
      midnight before succumbing.

      http://www.biographi.ca/EN/ShowBio.asp?BioId=36639
      <http://www.biographi.ca/EN/ShowBio.asp?BioId=36639&query> &query=
      http://tinyurl.com/6k9tpy
      (Same as above in case the first gets truncated)

      http://tinyurl.com/5fnrc8
      (Google search string)


      Great musician, Rogers was. His "Billy Green" got me started into
      looking into 1812. He died on the tarmac in the fire aboard Air Canada
      flight #797 in Cincinnati on June 2nd, 1983. Tragic loss.

      HTH
      Ian

      -----Original Message-----
      From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of Charlie
      Sent: August 1, 2008 1:18 PM
      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: 1812 Re: Brock's Monument

      Sirs,

      Please forgive my ignorance of Canadian history, which I am attempting
      to correct.

      I've recently heard a Stan Rogers' song called MacDonnell on the
      Heights about General Brock & a fellow (Major?) MacDonnell. Beautiful
      song (typical of Stan Rogers), and it piqued my interest in this man
      whose name is on Brock's Monument that you speak of.

      Is there further information on this story to be shared?

      Most appreciatively,

      Charlie Q



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gord Deans
      Dale, You are dead on the mark. Even with the daily grinding of holystones and swabbing, the tar seams were a great bother in the Carribean and Mediterranean
      Message 39 of 39 , Aug 18 9:28 PM
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        Dale,

        You are dead on the mark. Even with the daily grinding of holystones
        and swabbing, the tar seams were a great bother in the Carribean and
        Mediterranean Seas. With the sunlight from directly overhead and
        temperatures ranging from a "cool" 100 degrees F. through 130 degrees
        F., shoes were known to stick and be pulled off (I assume the buckled
        variety) just as they were known to fall from the yardarms. Some
        officers and definitely all midshipmen were sent aloft.

        Apparently there was no article of war to protect sailors from being
        struck by the officers' shoes although the reverse would earn the
        sailor a visit to see the Bosun's pet cat "Scourge".

        Alternately, the swelling ridges and stickiness of the tar (and cord)
        caulking would provide improved traction.

        Gord

        -----Original Message-----
        From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Dale Kidd
        Sent: August 18, 2008 7:25 PM
        To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: 1812 Re: Seamen's Shoes

        --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Colin" <usmarine1814@...> wrote:
        >
        so How was this done in 1812? Different shoe construction? DIfferent

        > materials.. Was sand on the deck more often than just in battle?


        Certainly not sand. The daily swabbing of the deck each morning was
        concluded with the decks being flogged (mopped) dry and clean.

        A thought, though... The decks of period ships were caulked with tar,
        which must have been fairly sticky in it's own right. I wonder if the
        caulking strips between the deckboards provided some traction?

        ~Dale
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