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Re: 1812 Re: Brock's Monument

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  • Peter Catley
    Ian and Ron, Incidentally the Wellington monument here in Wellington over looking the M5 in Somerset (The CENTRE of the Civilized Universe!) has a very similar
    Message 1 of 39 , Aug 1, 2008
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      Ian and Ron,

      Incidentally the Wellington monument here in Wellington over looking
      the M5 in Somerset (The CENTRE of the Civilized Universe!) has a very
      similar problem and we await the National Trust's survey and a
      proposal for restoration, costs of around £4 million ($8m USD/CDN) are
      being talked about but there isn't a commitment or a timetable yet :-)

      Cheers

      the Pensioner

      On 31 Jul 2008, at 22:28, ronpontiac wrote:

      > --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Ian Gardner" <igardner@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > I was by there a couple of weeks back and then again yesterday and
      > the
      > > scaffolding is going up. After sitting closed, it's nice to see that
      > the
      > > powers that be have realised the approaching bicentennial of the War
      > and
      > > are attending to things.
      > >
      > > Now if they could just get a crew to clear all the brush out from
      > the
      > > front of the Redan, I'd be a happy camper. Checked with Parks Canada
      > and
      > > scheduled completion is October '09. Don't suppose they could finish
      > on
      > > the 13th?
      > >
      > > Ian
      > >
      >
      > Ian,
      >
      > Brock's Monument was inspected on an annual basis by an engineering
      > firm skilled in this stuff. When they discovered deteriorating mortar,
      > Parks Canada had a more detailed survey undertaken showing that the
      > loose mortar was a concern and falling mortar a potential danger to
      > the
      > public. The monument was closed and a long scientific engineering
      > study undertaken to determine the best way to restore the Monument to
      > ensure its longetivity. Among other tests, boring, pressure tests,
      > seismic studies and so on were undertaken. The latter showed that
      > Queenston Heights is prone to earthquakes that could at some point in
      > the future bring the whole monument down. A detailed restoration
      > engineering design, building in earthquake precautions etc was
      > undertaken. Meanwhile, the globe was being searched for stone that
      > would blend with the original stone if any needed replacement. The
      > money was set aside in the budget a few years ago. What you see is the
      > final work after all of the preliminaries were undertaken. Parks
      > Canada did not want to simply tuck point loose mortar but wanted to
      > properly and scientifically restore the monument.
      >
      > You do them a great disservice suggesting that it was only the
      > approaching bicentennial that prompted action. Action was prompted by
      > the condition of the structure and Parks Canada's commitment to the
      > preservation and presentation of our National Historic Sites. Money
      > for such things is scarce and has to be used wisely and well.
      >
      > The Redan Battery is on Niagara Parks Commission land and they
      > maintain
      > the vegetation in that area. This year's weather has been against
      > them.
      >
      > Ron Dale
      >
      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gord Deans
      Dale, You are dead on the mark. Even with the daily grinding of holystones and swabbing, the tar seams were a great bother in the Carribean and Mediterranean
      Message 39 of 39 , Aug 18, 2008
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        Dale,

        You are dead on the mark. Even with the daily grinding of holystones
        and swabbing, the tar seams were a great bother in the Carribean and
        Mediterranean Seas. With the sunlight from directly overhead and
        temperatures ranging from a "cool" 100 degrees F. through 130 degrees
        F., shoes were known to stick and be pulled off (I assume the buckled
        variety) just as they were known to fall from the yardarms. Some
        officers and definitely all midshipmen were sent aloft.

        Apparently there was no article of war to protect sailors from being
        struck by the officers' shoes although the reverse would earn the
        sailor a visit to see the Bosun's pet cat "Scourge".

        Alternately, the swelling ridges and stickiness of the tar (and cord)
        caulking would provide improved traction.

        Gord

        -----Original Message-----
        From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Dale Kidd
        Sent: August 18, 2008 7:25 PM
        To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: 1812 Re: Seamen's Shoes

        --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Colin" <usmarine1814@...> wrote:
        >
        so How was this done in 1812? Different shoe construction? DIfferent

        > materials.. Was sand on the deck more often than just in battle?


        Certainly not sand. The daily swabbing of the deck each morning was
        concluded with the decks being flogged (mopped) dry and clean.

        A thought, though... The decks of period ships were caulked with tar,
        which must have been fairly sticky in it's own right. I wonder if the
        caulking strips between the deckboards provided some traction?

        ~Dale
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