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Re: Army Chaplain

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  • Kevin Windsor
    Jim, personally I would like to hear this. There is a United Church minister who is thinking about joining my group and being an army chaplain. Any info on or
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 1, 2000
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      Jim, personally I would like to hear this. There is a United Church
      minister who is thinking about joining my group and being an army chaplain.
      Any info on or off the list would be great!
      Thanks
      Kevin Windsor
      Cpl 89th Grenadiers

      ----------

      > From: Jim <jim@...>
      > Now having said this, I have almost brought a close to my investigation
      of
      > military chaplains during the War of 1812 and Nepoleonic era. Dare I say
      > more, and risk the scorching of flames like a heritic? Or should I sit
      > quietly by, and share my meager conclusions in personal conversation
      only?
      >
    • Christopher George
      Hello all: This is an aside related to the Army Chaplain discussion. George Robert Gleig whom I have mentioned on this list previously and who served with the
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 1, 2000
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        Hello all:

        This is an aside related to the Army Chaplain discussion. George Robert Gleig whom I have mentioned on this list previously and who served with the British during the 1814 Chesapeake and New Orleans campaigns although referred to in some modern books as "Chaplain Gleig" only took holy orders after the war was over, in 1820, and was not a chaplain while he served against the United States. He was the son of the Bishop of Brechin in Scotland, and was born at Stirling on 20 April 1796. Thus, he was aged 18 when he came to the United States with Ross's army in August 1814.

        Gleig served as a subaltern or Second Lieutenant in the 85th (Bucks) Light Infantry Regiment in the Peninsular campaigns of 1813 and 1814. He embarked for North America at Bourdeaux on May 31, 1814.

        It was while serving of curate of Westwell in Kent, beginning in 1820, at an annual living of �70, that Gleig wrote his "Narrative of the Campaigns of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans," at first published anonymously but in later editions under his own name. He was made chaplain-general of the British Army in 1844, an appointment he held until 1875. "Narrative of the Campaigns" would be the first of dozens of books that he would write, mostly on military topics, including biographies of Wellington and Clive and a narrative of the Battle of Waterloo, but also novels and theological works.

        According the Dictionary of National Biography, "Early in 1888, Gleig's health began to fail. He died on 9 July 1888 at Stratfield Turgis, near Winchfield, having retained his faculties almost to the last."

        Chris George, Editor
        Journal of the War of 1812
        http://www.cronab.demon.co.uk/jour.htm
        http://deja.com/~warof1812/ (War of 1812 Discussion)




        ---- Begin Original Message ----

        From: "Kevin Windsor" <kwind25@...>

        Jim, personally I would like to hear this. There is a United Church
        minister who is thinking about joining my group and being an army chaplain.
        Any info on or off the list would be great!
        Thanks
        Kevin Windsor
        Cpl 89th Grenadiers

        ----------

        > From: Jim <jim@...>
        > Now having said this, I have almost brought a close to my investigation of military chaplains during the War of 1812 and Nepoleonic era. Dare I say more, and risk the scorching of flames like a heritic? Or should I sit quietly by, and share my meager conclusions in personal conversation only?
        >


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      • Craig Williams
        Dare I say ... SHARE! SHARE! ...Please. Craig ... square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 1, 2000
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          Dare I say
          >> more, and risk the scorching of flames like a heritic?

          SHARE! SHARE! ...Please.

          Craig
          >>The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
          square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
          square miles...
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