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Scrap iron projectiles at New Orleans

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  • apk@rof.net
    Forgive me if someone else has jumped in with this before me, I only get the list in it s digest form. In his book Arming The Fleet , Spencer Tucker refers
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 28, 1999
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      Forgive me if someone else has jumped in with this before me, I only get the list in it's digest form. In his book "Arming The Fleet", Spencer Tucker refers to the U.S. Navy's use of "unconvential" projectiles.

      "...Case shot, known as canister or common case, was an improvement over what was variously called langrel, langridge, and langrage (the U.S. Nay term)- that is stones, nails, bolts, flints, or bits of scrap fired from cannon. Cannister shot consisted of a cylinder or case of iron or tin with tops and bottoms of wood or iron. The cylinder was packed wih pieces of small shot, bullets of different sizes, loose iron, or pebbles. William James, a contemporary British writer, complained that in the War of 1812 the Chesapeake unfairly employed canister shot made up of jagged pieces of iron, broken gunlocks, and copper nails."

      Although this citation refers specifically to naval ordinance, at New Orleans there were U.S. gunboats engaged, as well as the stores of cannon projectiles supplied by Lafitte. I would imagine that there is at least a possibility that langrage may have been used on the field. Just a "for what its worth" and now its back to the nunnery with me.

      Tony
      19th U.S.
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