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Re: British Attitudes Toward Americans in 1814

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  • Roger Fuller
    Then there was the Experimental Rifle Corps which ... Great post, Benton- all well said. Just let me clarify the one point mentioned in the sentence I
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 27, 1999
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      " Then there was the "Experimental Rifle Corps" which
      >included the vaunted 95th rifles -- 500 of whom were at New Orleans.

      Great post, Benton- all well said.

      Just let me clarify the one point mentioned in the sentence I excerpted from
      your remarks- the Experimental Rifle Corps, formed in 1800, became the 95th
      Regiment of Foot (Rifles) in 1803, and would remain so until 1816, when it
      was taken out of the line and renamed the Rifle Brigade. The other rifle
      units _in_ the Napoleonic/1812 era British Army were those of the 60th
      Regiment (5/, 6/, 7/ and 8/60), not including those of the KGL. All were
      separate entities in the Army until the amalgamations of the 1960s, when the
      60th (King's Royal Rifle Corps), 95th (Rifle Brigade), 43rd (Monmouthshire)
      and 52d (Oxf. and Bucks. Light Infantry) all became the Royal Green Jackets.
      (These were all the regiments of the Light Division of Peninsular fame.)
      The 95th (RB) was the direct ancestor, so to speak, of the the 3rd
      battalion, RGJ.

      Roger
      3/95th

      "...for better shots, either with artillery or small arms, do not exist than
      the Americans."
      p.336, Surtees, William, "Twenty-Five Years in the Rifle Brigade", London,
      Greenhill Books, 1996

      High praise indeed!
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